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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have a Macgregor 22 with the removable galley. I'm planning some overnights and longer trips for this summer and one of my questions comes to cooking on board.
I do not have a gimbaled stove or built in propane system. Instead I'm going to be relying on a two burner camp stove until something better comes available. It has wire legs to stand it off the counter.
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My concern is of it sliding off or my cookware sliding off and/or tipping. I don't know of a way to gimbal a stove like this but I was wondering if anyone knows of any kind of univeral pot holder that would work. I'm having trouble locating anything that isn't specific to a particular model.
Any ideas?
I'd rather not spend several hundred dollars on a new stove if I can make this work. I will be cooking in the cockpit on calm days but it takes one jerk in a powerboat to send things flying. And I'd like to be able to cook inside if it's wet/rainy.
 

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I have the same issue on my Bay Hen, usually cook in the cockpit on my Origo and I have definitely been waked out cooking noodles.

I don't really have an engineered solution. I am just careful. Wake comes and I hold the pot with the pot holder. There is probably a better way, but that's what I do. As above, I don't cook underway.
 

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For years I used a similar Coleman stove in the cockpit of my Tanzer 22 at anchor after making a wood wedge to put under it to level the sloping seat.

Bill
 

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When cooking like that on a small boat, your hard and fast rule has to be that you never leave a pot or skillet unattended. Gather all the utensils, spices and supplies that you'll need before you start, so you won't have to go hunting for them. Your family members or companions need to understand that they can't flop down on one side of the boat while you're cooking. Pay attention to your surroundings. Listen and look around you. If something rocks the boat, lift the pot off the stove. In effect, you'll be the gimbal.

Prepare meals at home to take with you. A rotini salad, for example, requires no cooking on board. Coffee and eggs for breakfast and sandwiches for lunch. Easy living is the rule. Dine ashore when you can. Relaxation and good food make cruising memorable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the advice everyone. Even when I cook at home I prep everything then I'm usually within arm's reach of the stove. Really my concern is morning coffee as I'm slow in the morning. What do yall think about a ring on the grate to keep things from sliding?
 

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Like a wire coat hanger or something? I would say it's worth a try. Inventing stuff is fun.
 

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The device you want to fabricate has to prevent a coffee pot from sliding off the burner, or from tipping over, and it has to prevent the stove from sliding off the seat. Moreover, can you rely on a device, made by yourself from a coat hanger, to protect your family and pets from scalding? Your only safe choices are to buy and install a proper gimbaled stove or attend to the Coleman stove constantly. IMO a home made device will give you a false sense of security and lull you into trusting the device and thinking it's OK to leave the stove unattended or relax your attention. There are times when your sole focus needs to be on what you're doing. Cooking with a portable stove on a small boat is one of those times. There will even be times when the conditions at the anchorage are so rough that you might have to forego your coffee.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The device you want to fabricate has to prevent a coffee pot from sliding off the burner, or from tipping over, and it has to prevent the stove from sliding off the seat. Moreover, can you rely on a device, made by yourself from a coat hanger, to protect your family and pets from scalding? Your only safe choices are to buy and install a proper gimbaled stove or attend to the Coleman stove constantly. IMO a home made device will give you a false sense of security and lull you into trusting the device and thinking it's OK to leave the stove unattended or relax your attention. There are times when your sole focus needs to be on what you're doing. Cooking with a portable stove on a small boat is one of those times. There will even be times when the conditions at the anchorage are so rough that you might have to forego your coffee.
No pets or family. And what I am thinking is to secure the feet with hooks or velcro to keep the stove from sliding as it's going to be sitting on smooth fiberglass. Maybe getting a 3/16" rod and making a barrier to keep the pot from sliding freely. I might be able to get an actual pot holder and attach it on either a piece of angle riveted to the stove or something similar.
The lake I sail is usually pretty calm and if I'm cooking then I won't be doing anything else. I'll ty to copy what I see working on larger boats.
 

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On our first boat which was 22', we used a single burner butane thing (at anchor), but also added a propane grill we could hang on a stern rail. That grill got the most use, again, at anchor only....although I do know a guy who races who likes to flip steaks underway during races to intimidate the other competitors :). Nothing hurts more than getting passed by a competitor casually grilling steaks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
On our first boat which was 22', we used a single burner butane thing (at anchor), but also added a propane grill we could hang on a stern rail. That grill got the most use, again, at anchor only....although I do know a guy who races who likes to flip steaks underway during races to intimidate the other competitors :). Nothing hurts more than getting passed by a competitor casually grilling steaks.
That would hurt. Lol.
I'm planning on a rail mounted grill. I want to anchor out on a calm day and grill steaks while all the fishermen get jealous. But because that is my plan I'm not too concerned about how to move a camp stove outside. I do admit that a single burner would be easy to gimble and would probably be the best choice. I just don't want to buy yet another stove....
 

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Would you consider having a portable generator, like the ubiquitous Honda2000? With one, you could use an electric kettle to make boiling water, for coffee, in literally about one minute. Cooking with an induction electric hobb is possible too and you take the LPG/flame issues out of the equation anyway. The induction hobbs shut themselves off the moment the pan/pot is removed. This doesn't help with sliding, but at least you can't have an open flame dump on the floor.

As an aside, I'm getting fairly tired of propane aboard and that's probably influencing my reply. I understand that a new generator, hobb, kettle, etc will add up. LPG is a finite resource aboard and I find it can be hard to refill, when we travel. More than once, I've topped up half full tanks, while I"m still home with a car. I'm seriously considering an upgrade to a full induction oven and stovetop aboard. Different gig, but just saying.

Back to propane, perhaps fashion a fixed, but removable BBQ mounts and use that for cooking? Even though I'd like to eliminate the gas down below, I'd never eliminate the BBQ. Therefore, I'm never fully eliminate LPG. However, running out for the BBQ is not as critical.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I don't have room for a generator. Otherwise I agree that would be a good solution.
What I think I'll do is secure the feet to keep the stove from moving, remote the fuel bottles with that extension hose. And make a sea rail.
For the "sea rail", my thoughts are to drill a few holes in the wind shielding on either side and place a movable rod to help keep pots from sliding forward. I'll be close where I can keep it in place this would just be an added safety measure. I would measure the largest pot and add 1/2" for some wiggle room. From there I can get a rail mount and put a grill outside.
Most meals would consist of mountain house meals, maybe bacon and eggs if calm in the morning. Sandwiches for lunch. No big meals unless I'm grilling which would be outside.
 

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Most meals would consist of mountain house meals, maybe bacon and eggs if calm in the morning.
The camp stove you linked above could be overkill for those. Just a backpaking jetboil (or other) would be sufficient. Even for coffee. They heat up quickly enough, you can easily tend to them from start to stop. Which you'd need to, as they could tip even easier. A jetboil can boil water in undera a couple of minutes. I bet I could make pre-cooked bacon and scrambled eggs in one too. :) Of course, Mountain House sells a dehydrated scrambled and bacon too.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The camp stove you linked above could be overkill for those. Just a backpaking jetboil (or other) would be sufficient. Even for coffee. They heat up quickly enough, you can easily tend to them from start to stop. Which you'd need to, as they could tip even easier. A jetboil can boil water in undera a couple of minutes. I bet I could make pre-cooked bacon and scrambled eggs in one too. :) Of course, Mountain House sells a dehydrated scrambled and bacon too.
Yeah but I'd have to buy one and I've already got this one. Although I could gimbal one really easily.
 

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My brother has the MSR equivalent of the Jetboil, can't remember what it's called. Any way, he got the hanging kit for it so we can hang it off the boom of our beach cat. Obviously we don't cook underway on the beach cat, but we will park (beach or anchor) to make coffee or warm up some dehydrated meal. A bit easier than gimbaling and cooking on the tramp of a beach cat would be a fools errand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The MSR I think is the pocket rocket, which is an unfortunate name ( Gotta clear my browser history now). I have a knock off I could possibly rig up. I'll look at the jet boil system and see if I can copy that system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Jetboil with hanging attachment you can clip it to hang and not worry about it falling over.
It's about $100 for a jet boil and another $30-$40 for the hanging attachment.
Or I have a pocket rocket I don't use. I could make a gimbal that would work with my existing pot.
4" 304ss ring
5" 304ss ring
24" 304ss 1" bar
18" 2024 t4 alum bar for a mount
Misc. Hardware most of which I already have.
Runs about $40
I've seen several diy gimbaled stoves similar to the seaswing or forespar mini galley. That's what I'm thinking of copying something like this:
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Thoughts?
I'll have to figure out a place to mount it, but if I can get that part figured out then I might clear up some work space.
 
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