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There is a good thread running regarding heat sealed connectors. My question concerns whether there are good corrosion preventing compounds that can be put inside the crimp. Specifically, I had trouble with a connector on deck that was chronically wet and would corrode inside, and between the ring and the terminal. I took to putting a very heavy water proof grease in both areas, and the problem is gone. However, using grease in a location (main panel or sub-panel, for example) where a fire is possible is another matter. The amount of grease required is, of course, ridiculously small after you clean-up.
 

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About the best thing I have found while sealing coax connectors on my ham radio antennas over the decades is a product called coax-seal. It is a ply able .non-adhesive caulk that is messy to remove but as you virtually never have to remove it, that's a small price to pay.
Check any amateur radio vendor web site (HRO, ASE, etc) as it's quite easy to find.

Putting something inside a crimp is more problematic. You have hit on the fundamental issue with crimps not being a very good option unless the connection is first soldered and then sealed from the outside. A crimp is useful only to physically secure an otherwise good connection from parting.
 

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There is a good thread running regarding heat sealed connectors. My question concerns whether there are good corrosion preventing compounds that can be put inside the crimp. Specifically, I had trouble with a connector on deck that was chronically wet and would corrode inside, and between the ring and the terminal. I took to putting a very heavy water proof grease in both areas, and the problem is gone. However, using grease in a location (main panel or sub-panel, for example) where a fire is possible is another matter. The amount of grease required is, of course, ridiculously small after you clean-up.
I can't believe that you use crimp connectors. They are really bad. Soldering is the only way to go. I hope others will chime in about their opinions on the matter.

:puke:birthday
 

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I can't believe that you use crimp connectors. They are really bad. Soldering is the only way to go. I hope others will chime in about their opinions on the matter.

:puke:birthday

I believe others will argue that crimp connectors are the recommended practice aboard boats. The problem is these recommendations are written to the lowest common denominator but most folks seem to take them as religious gospel.

As a practical matter, most people never crimp properly or know how to solder properly. Done correctly, soldering is the best electrical connection possible as long as the connection is not subject to stress which it obviously can be on a boat; hence, the recommendation to crimp connections. The single best form of connection is do both and properly seal it to preclude moisture penetration.
 

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k1vsk,
Knotty's post was facetious.
 

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Freedom 39
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I have been using Ilsco - Electrical connectors, compression, taps, splicers, grounding and more
for over 20 years on crimp and lug type connections that are exposed to the elements. I have had the opportunity to cut into connections that were over 15 years old and the copper wire was still nice and shiny after wiping this product off. A small tube will last for thousands of small crimp connections like those found on a small boat. There are other brands like No-OX that work well too. Most electrical supply houses will have one brand or another in stock as do many home improvement stores.
 

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PDQ-

If you're using heat-shrink crimp connectors, you shouldn't need anything to prevent corrosion, since they'll be sealed from the atmosphere by the adhesive lining the shrink tubing.
 

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I'm gonna chip in based on my experience in the power industry......not based on marine environment, but at least the same theory applies.

Connector manufacturers recommend the application of oxide inhibiting compound in the connection area, in other words, in the area of the actual connector compression. This is in part to reduce corrosion between dissimilar materials, i.e. - copper and aluminum, as well as lock out moisture and oxygen from the connection area.

I do not know if it is recommended to apply such a compound with heat shrink connectors. I did see a dielectric silicone compound offered by Ancor (item #700115) that might do the same.

Here is a link to one of the oxide inhibiting compounds Product Results - CTB manufactured by Thomas & Betts. Burndy and Penn Union also have their own. However, I am not sure if it would be effective in such a small connection area.

By the way, Ancor just put out a forum for electrical issues Easy Ac/Dc - Boat wiring questions, answers, comments and opinions
 

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Freedom 39
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x1404--The A/C electrical industry is also where I became acquainted with the Ilsco and T&B products when connecting dis-similar metals. When I was building Jeeps I started applying oxide inhibitors to the conductors, like the T&B product you linked, anytime I used a crimp connector. Many of the heat shrink connections would become submursed during river crossings but never failed because of it. Large rocks and tree limbs were more destructive.:eek: In a perfect world the heat shrink "should" keep moisture out. But if it does get in, why not have a second line of defense?

I used the same anti oxidtion products on boat trailer lights with crimp\heat shrink connections as well. I ended up replacing the trailer lights after ten years...before the connections failed, which was a first.

I do believe it is worth the minnimal additional time and expense. Cheap insurance.
 
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