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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am curious if anyone has heard of a 31' Corvette being taken offshore, crossing the pond or otherwise. I have some friends I haven't talk to in a long time who are sailing around the Carribean in one, but I don't know how it is working out for them. I have never been on board one, but I am thinking about adding it to my list of possibles. Any ideas.....
 

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cap'n chronic
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with a deck stepped mast, drop keel and a 22 foot water line i dont think i would want to.
the deck plan isnt the greatest and the interiors are small for a 31 footer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I wouldn't think they would be a lot different than an Alberg 30, except for the drop down keel. And the Alberg is an relative good boat offshore by most accounts. I am just not familiar enough with the structure of the boat and the rig, tough, or not so tough? A discussion of which C & C model to take offshore would probably belong on another post, however, I think that most boats can be modified to work well offshore, it is just a matter of how extensive those modifications need to be. So, which smaller C & C model might be up to the challenge, and what would be the major modifications needed to make that happen? Or perhaps, I should stick to more popular offshore models. The only reason I am curious is because in Ontario, there are a lot of C & C's around for sale, and I think they are attractive simple boats.
 

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cap'n chronic
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It may be like an alberg but be realistic, these are old boats.
Ive heard stories of people going offshore on boats smaller than 30 feet,even 20-25 feet but youll never hear from the ones that treid and never made it or the hurtbags that the coast guard had to rescue.
Im sure there are c&c models capable and built for offshore use such as the landfall models, otherwise the majority of c&c's are racer/cruisers.
I would prefer to go offshore on a boat that is engineered for that purpose and that has all the amenities to be comfortable and safe at the same time instead of trying to turn a boat into something its not to prove a point,save money or whatever other half @ssed reasons people have for pulling off such nonsense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I suppose that is all pretty much true. I guess its just a matter of figuring out which boats belong on that list, and which don't. I think I'll leave the Corvette off that list. And I am not a big fan of fin keels offshore, so that would take care of the rest of the C & C's. Thanks for the input.

Cheers.
 

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Here's a link to their website, with some interesting info...

C&C Corvette Sailboat Association - About the Corvette

On the face of it, you're right she looks somewhat like an Alberg.. not sure if the construction is on the same level of rugged, but if you're a traditionalist I guess this is the one C&C design you might consider for off shore.
 

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cc 31

Actualy the corvette was very well built and with full keel it is certainly capable of ocean cruising, despite the short WL.
Even though it was more of a performance boat.

However in regards to mr; cc33 remarks " he knows it all type" even if you have the best 50 foot boat in the world it doesnt mean you can do it!

Its more about the cond. of the boat and YOU...the sailor..:eek:
 

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cap'n chronic
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I have sailed on these boats and was just sharing my opinion.
Actually, I think they are classy looking boats and I almost bought one about 7 years ago until it failed a survey.
Oh, not to be a "know it all" but I think you are confusing the corvette with the C&C redwing 30.
The corvette has a drop keel while the redwing is a full keel.
In the water they look similar.
I didnt say it wasnt possible, just that I wouldnt do it.
But thank you for your first post, insuling me on an 8 month old thread.
:rolleyes:
 

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No one is insulting you, there is a difference between OPINION and facts.
When you make your opinion look like a fact, then no, its all truely yours buddy for keep... :rolleyes:

here is a very interesting article to read about ocean cruising on a smaller boats vs large;

Myth #4 - OCEAN CRUISING SAILBOATS MUST BE LARGE AND HEAVY

kick back and enjoy the wind...

:thewave:



It may be like an alberg but be realistic, these are old boats.
Ive heard stories of people going offshore on boats smaller than 30 feet,even 20-25 feet but youll never hear from the ones that treid and never made it or the hurtbags that the coast guard had to rescue.
Im sure there are c&c models capable and built for offshore use such as the landfall models, otherwise the majority of c&c's are racer/cruisers.
I would prefer to go offshore on a boat that is engineered for that purpose and that has all the amenities to be comfortable and safe at the same time instead of trying to turn a boat into something its not to prove a point,save money or whatever other half @ssed reasons people have for pulling off such nonsense.
 

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I have sailed on these boats and was just sharing my opinion.
Actually, I think they are classy looking boats and I almost bought one about 7 years ago until it failed a survey.
Oh, not to be a "know it all" but I think you are confusing the corvette with the C&C redwing 30.
The corvette has a drop keel while the redwing is a full keel.
In the water they look similar.
I didnt say it wasnt possible, just that I wouldnt do it.
But thank you for your first post, insuling me on an 8 month old thread.
:rolleyes:
I just looked at this old thread for the first time. No disrespect intended here, but I have owned a C&C Corvette for several years and it surprises me that nobody has taken the time to correct the statement above. I just looked at the Redwing which has a fin keel. My Corvette is indeed a full keel - but in addition it has a drop keel to give it 7' of draft when needed. The Alberg full keel has a little more draft but no drop keel. See the attached pic of my boat in the slings with the keel from front to back and as a contrast the Redwing 30 hull which has a fin and an exposed rudder. I've been offshore and came back to tell about it but there are better boats for this I agree. The reason I'm posting on this old thread is that the information (misinformation) is still out there and can be very misleading. See the attachments.
 

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WaterLogged
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Thanks CooknGas,

I just about bought a Corvette last year, but these posts probably swayed me away from it. My Tanzer worked nice and is very roomy for a 22'.
Now, I would like to go for that Corvette that I passed up on last year...
So, what did you find lacking, while offshore, that you couldn't modify it to perform better? I believe all hull areas are accessible since no liners are used.

Someone reported that the lower hull is 3/4" thick , upper hull tappers to 3/8", and the seam is supposedly 1" thick and well done. Apparently the robustness is not lacking or have I been mislead?

The Columbia31 looks very similar to the Corvette and is considered offshore capable by some.
 

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I wouldn't think they would be a lot different than an Alberg 30, except for the drop down keel. And the Alberg is an relative good boat offshore by most accounts.
Alberg 30: Motion Comfort 31.67, Capsize Ratio: 1.68

C&C Corvette 31: Motion Comfort 27.65, Capsize Ratio: 1.78



Just for comparisons sake, compare it to a Catalina 27: Motion Comfort 24.03, Capsize Ratio: 1.87

...and these well known bluewater boats:

Westsail 32: Motion Comfort: 43.61, Capsize Ratio: 1.62

Cape Dory 30: Motion Comfort 32.82, Capsize Ratio: 1.67
 

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From another thread:

.......Get away from the ratios and other numbers and go sailing.
The stats you're quoting are not reliable nor of particular use when evaluating a design. You need to get on some boats - even if only at the dock to start with - to get an idea of what accommodations can be like, how much space/foot you get from any particular era of boat design. Find out what 'feels' right to you (or, perhaps at this stage, to an experienced friend)

Look in particular at storage space, plentiful lockers, access to all parts of the boat, serviceable systems, and so on...
 

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I call a big BS on this article and those British naval architects.
For instance. I know people who have had a thousand miles without wind coming out of Panama heading for the Marquesas, nearly 4k miles. At a good clip that's around 40 days at sea with no supermarkets available for a sub 20 footer, and probably a whole lot more time. Keeping in mind that one should, at the very least, carry provisions for 1.5 times the expected duration of a voyage, more is certainly advisable, that's a whole lot of provisions. Water can be collected at sea if the squall lasts long enough to wash the salt from the collection device, but at sea that is a pretty big if.
I don't see that a sub 20 footer can carry enough food, water, sails and some necessary spares for a 4 thousand mile voyage, unless that sailor is counting on a lot of luck to get him/her through.
I'll grant that a well found sub 20 foot vessel could make the voyage, but practically speaking, I'm not so sure the sailor would.
 
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