SailNet Community banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Senior Moment Member
Joined
·
13,298 Posts
The only big expense in replacing chainplates is if they are inaccessible - glassed to the hull, hidden by elaborate cabinetry etc. or if their attaching points are rotted - bulkhead replacement needed and so forth.

If it's simply replacing like with like it shouldn't even get to a boat buck - assuming you turn the wrenches.

Take one or two out and give them to the machine shop to use as templates. They should be made from flat bar, not cut out of plate with a jet. Get them electropolished for a few bucks more and replace - then two more and so on.

I did them on my Columbia 43, which included a fair bit of welding and the reconstruction of a fairly elaborate headstay fitting for less that $1K.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CheckedOutRob

·
Senior Moment Member
Joined
·
13,298 Posts
Well, my intent is serious voyaging so unfortunately I cannot trust any chainplates original to the boat. I'd be tickled pink to hear they had been replaced but it probably isn't so. Stainless is one metal that has a cumulative fatigue lifespan. Stainless work hardens. Work hardening means "brittle". A chainplate cycle loads and work hardens. I've heard of people removing their 'plates and breaking them in half with their hands. Easily.
I did exactly that with my headstay fitting. It looked O/K but had some brown staining so I buffed it up with my buffing wheels. It came up like chrome but there was a faint hairline scratch remaining - I buffed some more but it was still there. I took the whole fitting in my hands and tried to bend it whereupon it twisted like taffy and snapped through the hairline mark. I doubt it took 20 lbs of force to tear it in two and it had looked perfect - the hairline was nearly invisible.

At that point I pulled them all and made up new ones.
 

·
Senior Moment Member
Joined
·
13,298 Posts
Why do you say that?
Why not. ;) Why would you go to the trouble and expense to WJ cut a chainplate out of a piece of plate instead of simply using a length of correctly sized flat bar?

If you have chains that are some obscure shape then yeah - WJ cutting is great but the vast majority of chains are simple flat bar, drilled as required.
 
  • Like
Reactions: davidpm
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top