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Captain S/V Triumph
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804 Posts
If I understand correctly, all of the standing rigging of a typical sailboat can only be absolutely counted on for 10 years. After that, you are officially "on your own".

Since it sounds like you are in the market for a used boat well beyond 10 years old, and you are going to: "My intent is crossing oceans and voyaging for many years." and with your statement: "I build/repair inspect aircraft for a living.." everything there says you will be replacing the standing rig, including the chainplates.

Compared to rebuilding a plane, replacing any chainplates should be childs' play to you.

I loved your statement: "I realize I'll need to do a refit. I'm hoping not to do a massive years long refit turning into a money-suck. That would be dumb."

If you are doing a refit, it will be long and will cost a lot. Calling this reality "dumb" is "funny" at the least.... :)

Good luck in your purchase!
 

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Captain S/V Triumph
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804 Posts
FYI, after my chainplates broke a couple years ago various riggers and other experts strongly advised using the new titanium alloy chainplates are the only way to go.
 

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Captain S/V Triumph
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804 Posts
For whatever it is worth / IMHO, the cost of Titanium is well offset by the "cost" either in money or your own time, of the installation, not to mention the greater strength it will have to accomplish their job, and save your rig from failure.

FYI, my wife and I lost our 50 footer 1000 miles out to sea on July 27th 2011, because our chainplates broke.

So, buy your chainplates wisely.... :)
 

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Captain S/V Triumph
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804 Posts
As i said titanium is not the way to go. Save yourself the time and $. 316 is fine dude. Bed it correctly and no worries for atleast 3 years. I dont know about your chainplates speific but mine are very easy to pulland check up close every year.
How much is your rig worth? How much is your boat worth? And finally, how much is your life worth?

Compare those answers to how much would these titanium chainplates cost?

The person who started this thread claims he will be cruising across oceans for years. If he can afford to do that, I can only assume he can splurge a little on some TOP quality chainplates.

Most boats you would cross the Atlantic with are not that small that the chainplates can be easily pulled and inspected annually. Mine are very deeply installed into this boat.

WHY not spend the money for the best that todays' technology can provide for such an important part of your boat?

If you are on a hot dog and raman noodles budget, then besides "saving" on chainplates, perhaps you would do best to stay in an apartment... IMHO.

Nobody ever said Yachting is a cheap endeavor. IF they did, they were wrong.
 

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Captain S/V Triumph
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804 Posts
Titnium are a waste of money unless you are going to be keeping the boat for a very long time. Even thenbe why bother? You still onlyand have ten to fifteen years on the rigging. Its just another wy to spendthe more $ then youi need. Unless your circumnaving or sailing theis southern. Ocean beefy 316 will be justa fine. Id recomend titanium too if i was a seller. Motr $ in my poket.c
This is what the person asking for advice stated:

"My intent is crossing oceans and voyaging for many years. I intend to own this boat for a long time."

So, with this in mind, you don't want to scrimp on chainplates.... go with Titanium. It is what you do in 2013 if you want the best.
 

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Captain S/V Triumph
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804 Posts
Ive seen some really complicated chainplate setups. My boat is super simple. If you bed them right then like standing rigging 306 should not be able to corrode enough to do any crevice damage for atleast three years. Then simply check once per until the seven eight mark. If your like me you hose the deck with freshwater after salt water sailing.

Your standing rigging is only good for ten. So why buy titanium when you will have to replace the whole rig anyway? When that time comes any prudent captain would pull the chains for inspection anyway so i, really not seeing the critical value of titainium vs beefy 306 here. Its just a lot of flash and money. Its like dropping a cat back exhaust in a honda civic . Sure it might add some hp and not corrode like factory but at the end of the day its still a honda.
The cost to me do not justify the expense but its not my boat. Its his choice. That money saved could be a whole nother island adventure and besides a circum nav will not take longer then 3 or 4 after which case you will need to do a complete and thorough inspect of the entire rig and system ANYWAY, including the chainplates.v
Though standing rigging is "only good for ten", nobody I know actually follows that schedule. Maybe you do, but nobody around Boston whom I know is, or else every single sailboat here would have a new rig.

Anyway, after my chainplates broke 1000 miles out to sea, 2 different riggers were clear on one thing: Use Titanium if you are replacing your chainplates.

For me, (a 1986 Ta Chiao CT 56), it is more than enough of a hassle to actually access and replace the chainplates, and knowing I am not going to replace my rig every 10 years, if / when I do replace my chainplates I sure am going to use titanium.

Save a few bucks if you want, I would rather have peace of mind, within the realities of how often I actually do replace my rig / chainplates; i.e., once per generation. :)
 

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Captain S/V Triumph
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804 Posts
The idea that chainplates and standing rigging are going to be replaced every three years is sort of nutty. I know I have never seen anyone who did that, and I have been around a boat or two LOL. I do not even know anyone who replaces all of the running rigging every three years, all that rope and the sails and the stainless adds up to a huge pile of cash no matter who you are, and what generally happens is that a person will inspect it or have it inspected at the time of purchase and then replace the stuff that is either missing, broken, or will be broken before next season. Then after that it is a continual maintenance thing, polishing, cleaning, repairing, and praying that this crap does not come apart anytime there is a storm is all part of most people's boating experience. I personally do all of my own work on the boats that I have owned, with minor exceptions, and I get to know the boat very well, and this lets me know what I can get away with waiting to fix, and what I cannot.

If something is going to fall and bonk me on the head, or is going to let the water on the outside get to be on the inside,or something that is going to catch on fire and toast me and the boat, or make it impossible to steer the boat then it gets fairly immediate attention. If something is going to make it hard for me to eat, drink, use the toilet, or shower it gets attention as soon as I can conveniently deal with it. If something is just a minor nuisance or inconvenience but it is not going to burn me, drown me, or keep me from being comfortable, then I deal with it during routine maintenance that I schedule for every week, month, and year.

There is always something to do on a boat, there is no such thing as having nothing that you need to do, but at least some of it can wait until you get done doing what you want to do. After all, if you make yourself a slave to the boat then you are just working, and you are not even getting paid for it.
Reality, clearly stated! I love to hear this stuff so much more than the unrealistic BS so often stated.

Bravo Sailor, bravo!
 

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Captain S/V Triumph
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804 Posts
I did not say REPLACE, I simply said inspect- my chainplate broke in a small craft advisory on the St. Johns from a fracture between the deck and underside so my visual inspection was worthless- you had to PULL THE CHAINPLATE to be able to see it. So after three years you SHOULD pull the chainplates and inspect- BOTH SIDES!!!!! I only pulled the starboard side and it was so nice looking I skipped port. Port was the one that snapped in 25 knots risking mast collapse.

Also- Circumnavigating is WAY different than occasional sailing. The CONSTANT stress and loads, salt corrosion, and constant use warrant a COMPLETE CHECK UP after said circum navigation INCLUDING chainplates titanium or not. I said a rig is good for 10- yes it can make 20 but come 15 Im replacing unless Im in fresh water. Your standing rigging is only trumped by your seacocks. Standing rigging includes chainplates. So unless your going titanium shrouds and turn buckles too I REALLY dont see the point in the expense of titanium over 306.
Unless your chainplates are installed on the outside of your hull, (unlike mine), they are generally installed in such places that corrosion can more easily get to them than to your exposed turnbuckles, etc., which again, you can much more easily clean up.

So, there is a big difference in the full spectrum of stresses which the plates will be exposed to vs. the rest of the rig. Titanium will NOT rust.

And, as I mentioned, in reality I am only going to change these once. So, I will use the best material available for those, and then I won't have to take apart my cabin interior to "inspect" them. Which unless you are going to do the dye test, or an Xray, just looking at them doesn't really tell you jack.

Why fight using the best especially for such a deeply nested, hard to replace, and important part(s), which statistically speaking, you are only going to replace once, per boat you own.

Fair winds....
Doug
 

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Captain S/V Triumph
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804 Posts
Though my ancestors were from Spain and Germany I often suspect a frugal Scottish ancestor in there somewhere, because I am cheap as all get out, but then the German kicks in once I start working on something and it has to be done right or not at all. The fight between Scotland and Germany must rage at times in my DNA, because the frugal side knows better than to start a repair project because once started all that cheapheartedness has to be pushed aside.
Well, besides ancestry, age and experience has taught me that in the long run, quite frequently, using / buying the best, actually saves me money.

And on top of all that, my ancestry must have someone who was lazy, because I'd much rather only tackle something as difficult as changing my chainplates, (or pulling my motor), once, if at all possible.

So, when I do pull my motor, I also balance it by grinding the outside of the shank of each connecting rod until the entire piston assemblies all weigh the same, within a fraction of a gram. Makes for a very smooth running motor, but more importantly it will LAST A LONG TIME.

Sadly, I beleive we spend around 80% of our "sailing time" maintaining our boats, and 20% sailing if we are very, very lucky. Use Titanium. :)
 
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