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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm about to fly out to a pre-purchase survey on a 1985 Passport 40. I looked at a survey done on this boat last year and apparently the chainplates are original on this '85 boat. Noted was some water evidence near one of the port chainplates. I'll need to replace them regardless and would like to know what I'm in for cost-wise. I'll need to get some 316 SS water jet cut for the new chainplates and open up the interior to get the chainplates in. I'll likely do some of the work myself but may or may not depending on yard policies.

Is this a $4,000 job or is it a $10,000+ job?? How much time would a yard take for this project? What would be a good yard for this in Washington?

My intent is crossing oceans and voyaging for many years. I intend to own this boat for a long time. I'm experienced and have crossed oceans and I build/repair inspect aircraft for a living so not afraid of complex jobs.

The survey indicates a newer Perkins installed in 2000 as well as several items I need such as wind vane and some newer sails and SSB and diesel cabin heat as well as some other recent upgrades.

I realize I'll need to do a refit. I'm hoping not to do a massive years long refit turning into a money-suck. That would be dumb. If you've replaced your chainplates I'd be interested in how that went and it's cost. ...And if you know of anyone on the west US with a Passport 40 who might be willing to sell -I'm buying.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, refit is a relative word. I guess I meant offshore prep for safety. Refit seems to some to mean "replace everything". I think I used it incorrectly. Currently newer sails, refer, standing rigging instruments and engine indicate a concientious owner. I think a some of the people I see on the list are really brilliant with tools and then again some should not pick up a wrench.
I see the same thing in aircraft -people buy an aircraft with starry eyes then realize they do not have the federal licence to perform the work. Parts are a fortune and so is my labor -but I'm good and very fair. The aircraft sits a long time and sucks money and tie down fees. So I think I know mostly what I'm in for. I'm intently avoiding a "project" boat. I'm attempting to take emotion out of the purchase equation but boats are alluring little beasties.

I'd love to hear what someone who has done a chainplate r&r has to offer as advice on cost and time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I don't think water jet is the best tool for cutting chainplates. It leaves a somewhat coarse edge that will need to be cleaned up to avoid corrosion. Personally I'd machine then (CNC or manual).

There is no way that a few custom machined bars of 316 stainless steel should cost $10k.
-Hmmmm. I thought water jet cut absolutely razor clean edges? Hence the reason for water jet cutting recommendations on chain plates. I know the need to polish and then electropolish to remove stress risers after the cutting. Is your comment that water jet leaves rough edges conjecture or first hand? Jus wonderin. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Roland,

Thanks for the support on this project!! You didn't mention the size of boat you did the work on but it sounds like you understand where I'm coming from. Liked that you noted the cost and suppliers. It's what I was hoping to hear. Now I just have to find somewhere to work on my boat if I go ahead with the purchase.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Now THAT is what I'm hoping for! $1000 bucks for parts and a #(*$&load of my labor should work ok. BUT, the surveyor noted that there was water intrusion in the port forward knee. Everything being equal I believe I may go ahead with the purchase simply because all the other things I'd need for an offshore boat are mostly there and fairly servieable/newer. I'll never find a 100% boat unless it's close to $200k and if I do the work I know it's solid. I would not go ahead with a boat that had a timed out engine unless it was completely compensated for in purchase price ie. appx. $18K.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I live near Los Angeles but the boat is in state of WA. Intent -if I ok the purchase- is leave in WA for several mos. and purchase a WA cruising permit. Do a little work on and off. Sail south. Stop in Oregon for some days on way south and enjoy seafood. Pass Kalifornia completely without stopping ashore and go to a shipyard then marina in Ensenada for several mos. Return to CA after one year. I have retained a marine atty who is consulting me on this. You-know-why.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Well, my intent is serious voyaging so unfortunately I cannot trust any chainplates original to the boat. I'd be tickled pink to hear they had been replaced but it probably isn't so. Stainless is one metal that has a cumulative fatigue lifespan. Stainless work hardens. Work hardening means "brittle". A chainplate cycle loads and work hardens. I've heard of people removing their 'plates and breaking them in half with their hands. Easily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Thanks. I have heard that titanium does not corrode (or takes forever). I may pursue that route but if the trade-off in dollars for titanium 'plates is insanely high I may stick with 316. I also like that Ti does not need polishing. That because I don't see the life of a 1985 boat being 60+ years. My knowledge of titanium is relative to aircraft. I gotta assume the really huge mass of titanium required to fab up 6 chainplates is outrageously expensive. Metals have recently gone sky high in price. One tiny 3/8 aircraft bolt in titanium costs about $12++. But I applaud you for having the foresight to install titanium and never have to worry again. That's peace of mind and worth the cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Uh, CA sales tax is 8%. You buy in CA and you are legally bound to simply cut that check for 8% of book value of your new boat and drop it in the mail to CA BOE. Forget to do it? They'll have you and your boat. They are merciless. AND they'll charge you late fees, interest and penalties.

Washington allows a cruising permit for 6 mos. There are other states to sail to. My atty will file the correct papers with CA to prove yacht was not in CA. If you are buying a boat of any consequence you need to do your due diligence.

I don't want to tip my hat if any of the bad guys monitor this board.

BUT, I pay a hell of a lot of taxes. I follow the law and support my country. Tax avoidance IS A RIGHT. Tax evasion is illegal and should be punished accordingly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
As the OP on this thread I should follow up on the title of this post.

I just did walk away from the Passport 40 this week. Long flight to WA to check it out. Needed new teak deck, engine oil in bilge, chainplates looked bad, leaks from saloon windows, ugliest mast I've ever seen -painted brown, mainsail shot, several diesel leaks, smelly head, dodger shot, rig had issues etc, etc.
BUT fantastic news!!!! I'm closing on an amazingly good shape Nordic 44 next week.
 
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