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Blue Horizons
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Unless you simply like throwing away money I seriously suggest you give this man a call. He made my chain plates and another guys at my marina and they are WAY beefier than what I had and were almost too cheap to believe. Its high quality work but he charges extra for polishing, boring holes, ect ect. I just simply had the plates made and did the polishing and booring myself. I am not related to this man and have no continued working relation with him what so ever. Talon on this website also used him I believe after I gave him his info.


Mr. James Idel. He works under the business Fab Solutions. His phone number is (904) 982-6113.
Id give him a call- what could it hurt?
 

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I must have missed something between "some water evidence near one of the port chainplates" (rebed chainplates) and "I'll need to replace them regardless".
Do you mean you'll need to replace them regardless of whether they need replacement ?:confused:
Never mind, you got the survey, I've had leaky chainplates, never had "water incursion at the knee", that could take some work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I live near Los Angeles but the boat is in state of WA. Intent -if I ok the purchase- is leave in WA for several mos. and purchase a WA cruising permit. Do a little work on and off. Sail south. Stop in Oregon for some days on way south and enjoy seafood. Pass Kalifornia completely without stopping ashore and go to a shipyard then marina in Ensenada for several mos. Return to CA after one year. I have retained a marine atty who is consulting me on this. You-know-why.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Well, my intent is serious voyaging so unfortunately I cannot trust any chainplates original to the boat. I'd be tickled pink to hear they had been replaced but it probably isn't so. Stainless is one metal that has a cumulative fatigue lifespan. Stainless work hardens. Work hardening means "brittle". A chainplate cycle loads and work hardens. I've heard of people removing their 'plates and breaking them in half with their hands. Easily.
 

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Well, my intent is serious voyaging so unfortunately I cannot trust any chainplates original to the boat. I'd be tickled pink to hear they had been replaced but it probably isn't so. Stainless is one metal that has a cumulative fatigue lifespan. Stainless work hardens. Work hardening means "brittle". A chainplate cycle loads and work hardens. I've heard of people removing their 'plates and breaking them in half with their hands. Easily.
I did exactly that with my headstay fitting. It looked O/K but had some brown staining so I buffed it up with my buffing wheels. It came up like chrome but there was a faint hairline scratch remaining - I buffed some more but it was still there. I took the whole fitting in my hands and tried to bend it whereupon it twisted like taffy and snapped through the hairline mark. I doubt it took 20 lbs of force to tear it in two and it had looked perfect - the hairline was nearly invisible.

At that point I pulled them all and made up new ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Thanks. I have heard that titanium does not corrode (or takes forever). I may pursue that route but if the trade-off in dollars for titanium 'plates is insanely high I may stick with 316. I also like that Ti does not need polishing. That because I don't see the life of a 1985 boat being 60+ years. My knowledge of titanium is relative to aircraft. I gotta assume the really huge mass of titanium required to fab up 6 chainplates is outrageously expensive. Metals have recently gone sky high in price. One tiny 3/8 aircraft bolt in titanium costs about $12++. But I applaud you for having the foresight to install titanium and never have to worry again. That's peace of mind and worth the cost.
 

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If your serious about going offshore then this project is a must and can be done by yourself. If your cruising plans are 10+ years and crossing several oceans then you will probably need to do the project again...probably in a little out of the way place with scant resources. I'm on my second set. DIY now, then you'll have the experience and knowledge to do it again.
 
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Captain S/V Triumph
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For whatever it is worth / IMHO, the cost of Titanium is well offset by the "cost" either in money or your own time, of the installation, not to mention the greater strength it will have to accomplish their job, and save your rig from failure.

FYI, my wife and I lost our 50 footer 1000 miles out to sea on July 27th 2011, because our chainplates broke.

So, buy your chainplates wisely.... :)
 

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Blue Horizons
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Titnium are a waste of money unless you are going to be keeping the boat for a very long time. Even thenbe why bother? You still onlyand have ten to fifteen years on the rigging. Its just another wy to spendthe more $ then youi need. Unless your circumnaving or sailing theis southern. Ocean beefy 316 will be justa fine. Id recomend titanium too if i was a seller. Motr $ in my poket.c
 

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rob-
Titanium is expensive in two ways: The metal itself, and machining it. A bolt will be expensive because of the threading and machining, in that sense it could almost be cheaper to cut (waterjet, plasma, whatever) a titanium chainplate than to thread titanium parts. Stainless is prone to crevice failure if it gets damp and stays damp--as chainplates are prone to do. Titanium doesn't have that problem. Then again, neither does bronze, which may be another consideration for you if the strength is high enough.
Access, interior trim or hull work, and whether the water damage has crept several yards beyond the chainplate, these are the things that can really push up the price way beyond the parts.
 

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-Hmmmm. I thought water jet cut absolutely razor clean edges? Hence the reason for water jet cutting recommendations on chain plates. I know the need to polish and then electropolish to remove stress risers after the cutting. Is your comment that water jet leaves rough edges conjecture or first hand? Jus wonderin. Thanks.
Waterjet does have the ability to cut that fine, and should do so, what I imagine they are talking about is plasma arc cutting, which leaves a nasty edge, but it is easily ground off. If the yard charges you $6k for doing chain plates you need to have them shot for theft.
 

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I live near Los Angeles but the boat is in state of WA. Intent -if I ok the purchase- is leave in WA for several mos. and purchase a WA cruising permit. Do a little work on and off. Sail south. Stop in Oregon for some days on way south and enjoy seafood. Pass Kalifornia completely without stopping ashore and go to a shipyard then marina in Ensenada for several mos. Return to CA after one year. I have retained a marine atty who is consulting me on this. You-know-why.
Actually I would like to know why.
Sales tax?
What is a WA cruising permit.
 

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Why do you say that?
Why not. ;) Why would you go to the trouble and expense to WJ cut a chainplate out of a piece of plate instead of simply using a length of correctly sized flat bar?

If you have chains that are some obscure shape then yeah - WJ cutting is great but the vast majority of chains are simple flat bar, drilled as required.
 
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Blue Horizons
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As i said titanium is not the way to go. Save yourself the time and $. 316 is fine dude. Bed it correctly and no worries for atleast 3 years. I dont know about your chainplates speific but mine are very easy to pulland check up close every year.
 

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Captain S/V Triumph
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As i said titanium is not the way to go. Save yourself the time and $. 316 is fine dude. Bed it correctly and no worries for atleast 3 years. I dont know about your chainplates speific but mine are very easy to pulland check up close every year.
How much is your rig worth? How much is your boat worth? And finally, how much is your life worth?

Compare those answers to how much would these titanium chainplates cost?

The person who started this thread claims he will be cruising across oceans for years. If he can afford to do that, I can only assume he can splurge a little on some TOP quality chainplates.

Most boats you would cross the Atlantic with are not that small that the chainplates can be easily pulled and inspected annually. Mine are very deeply installed into this boat.

WHY not spend the money for the best that todays' technology can provide for such an important part of your boat?

If you are on a hot dog and raman noodles budget, then besides "saving" on chainplates, perhaps you would do best to stay in an apartment... IMHO.

Nobody ever said Yachting is a cheap endeavor. IF they did, they were wrong.
 
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