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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All but one screw came out easy. This one has a broken head. Hoping to get under with hacksaw blade to cut it off. But question is how does one clean and lube these older winches? This is vintage 1966. Works fine so I would like to give it a shot at another 48 years.
 

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Might be easier to drill the offender out if it's not spinning too easily.. less likelihood of damage to the underlying surface.

Hard to tell what kind of winch that is now that the drum's off.. I'd soak the parts in solvent, get rid of any old, hardened grease, check the pawls and springs and reassemble with light waterproof grease.
 

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Might be easier to drill the offender out if it's not spinning too easily.. less likelihood of damage to the underlying surface.

Hard to tell what kind of winch that is now that the drum's off.. I'd soak the parts in solvent, get rid of any old, hardened grease, check the pawls and springs and reassemble with light waterproof grease.
But no grease on the pawls, only oil!!
 

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I cleaned up a few of my old Barient's.

Disassemble, soaked in a bucket of diesel overnight, then use a toothbrush to clean all the old grease and grime off them.

Reassemble with light grease and, as noted above, oil only on the pawls/springs.

I made another video of the Barient 21 if interested.
 

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Here is a pic pre demolition...
... don't drop anything.. I'm thinking parts for those oldtimers will be hard to find!! Do you have a brand name?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I cannot see a brand name. Did get them apart without losing anything (I think). Will clean up with solvent. I get the part about oil only on pawls. I see a small hole in the top of the winch when assembled that says "oil". In terms of grease what do I use? Being a major rookie at getting inside a winch a grease name would be most helpful. Does Home Depot sell anything I could use? Yep I am always trying to make a nickel scream. :)
 

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Lithium grease will do the job.
 

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I like 'Phil' bicycle grease for my gears, and as has been said, light oil like 3-in-1 for the pawls. The particularity for the pawls is because they have to easily spring back. Grease would inhibit that, therefore a very light oiling for the pawls

--oh, a tip to prevent parts loss: take a box, large enough to fit round the winch. Cut a hole in it just enough to tightly fit round the winch. When disassembling/reassembling the winch, have the box round it to contain flying pawl springs etc
 

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I cannot see a brand name. Did get them apart without losing anything (I think). Will clean up with solvent. I get the part about oil only on pawls. I see a small hole in the top of the winch when assembled that says "oil". In terms of grease what do I use? Being a major rookie at getting inside a winch a grease name would be most helpful. Does Home Depot sell anything I could use? Yep I am always trying to make a nickel scream. :)
There is special winch grease, sold by the manufacturers (Harken, Lewmar, ...). You won't find it a Home Depot but West Marine and Co have it. Yes, it probably costs 10 times as much as generic lithium grease but one tube will last a decade. I don't know whether it is any different than the cheaper stuff but at the cost of a dollar a year, why would I risk to do some long-term damage to equipment that costs hundreds or thousands?
 

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Super-Lube.. Silicone w/teflon . Sold in box stores and better hardware outlets. Superior to anything I've ever used on anything needing "permanent" grease. Even
decent as a dielectric grease! Usta get mine @discount at Radio Shack years back.

A tube of super lube anna quart of synthetic oilwill keep yer stuff going for yergreat-great-=grandkids ;)
 

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Those might be antique Merriman winches.

As far as winch lubrication goes, I'd like to add a bit of "against the grain" info here. I now exclusively use white lithium grease on my winches. I have tried everything over the years - water pump grease, insanely overpriced "winch" grease from the manufacturer, PTFE grease etc. etc.

The white lithium is actually a cream colour and has a consistency about like stiff yogurt. I currently have a cup of Gunk brand and it is specifically recommended for boat winches. You have to be sure to get some with this colour and texture. I have also seen "white lithium grease" that was much more like the usual grease you see - more of a dark amber colour and very stiff, like wheel bearing grease - DON'T use this stuff.

It goes on cleanly and stays clean - doesn't trap dirt like the other stickier greases. It also leaves everything freer - the winches turn noticeably more easily. Its lower viscosity than the other commonly used winch greases gives it these attributes. I've been using it for at least 20 years now and have NEVER had a spring or pawl or any other failure on a winch greased with it.

Here's the sacrilege - you can GREASE your pawls & springs with it. A light coating clings better than oil but doesn't cause the stiction that heavier greases would (and which is the reason for the conventional wisdom of oil only on them). This has the added benefit of quieting the winches - the pawls go tic tic tic instead of clink, clink, clink.

I grease everything quite heavily, reassemble the winches and rotate them several times, pop the drums off again and wipe off all the "squeeze out", then reassemble. That gives the exact right amount everywhere internally.

It has the added benefit of cleaning up easily when you strip the winches next time - no wire brushes needed to get the dried crust off things - everything rinses clean in solvent or diesel.

Only one lubricant needed for everything, including your throttle cables, shift mechanisms, steering cables etc. as well. A cup of it costs about $5 and lasts for about a decade - try it, you'll like it a lot.

As for PTFE greases (Teflon), a friend who was in the bearing business for decades said it should NOT be used on caged roller bearings. It is so slippery that the rollers tend to skid instead of rolling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thinking ahead a little bit what is the recommended process and materials used to rebel a primary winch? Is this a job for epoxy base or something like boat life?
 

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what is the recommended process and materials used to rebed a primary winch? Is this a job for epoxy base or something like boat life?
Holy cats, no! Don't use epoxy! You will have to take these things off sometime, or there is that possibility. 4200 or the like is just fine.

I haven't seen your winch innards, but is it necessary to remove the whole thing to clean and regrease? On both my Harken and now Andersen winches I got most everything just by taking them apart and left the 'cage' or whatever it's called bolted down and cleaned around that. Another good reason to use the box, keeping the mess down
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Ha! Sounds like my no epoxy guess was way off. :) I can see now I need an adhesive/sealer like 4200. Sounds good. I removed the winches because my original intent was to refinish the teak block bases which are in rough condition. All part of cockpit teak refinish proj. Anyway they are off. So I will now refinish bases clean/regrease and rebed winches. Are there any special tricks to using the 4200?
 

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Super lube x 2. Any of those old style winches that I've had apart did not use roller bearings, just a sleeve if anything. I always had great results with this product. A little goes a long way.
 

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Wow dude, those winches are ancient. I thought the Wilcox Crittendons on my Coronado were antiques.

The advice you're getting here, is good though. You might also consider just selling them as antiques, and calling Bacon Sails and asking about their used winch selection and getting something that doesn't pre-date the Ark.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Right on... they may have some miles and years on them but they work great. So unless as antiques they would bring enough money to get me some newer self-tailing jobbies, they are staying.
 
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