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Ok you don’t get it.....as evidenced by making excuses for what you did. You did something very unsafe.
That diatribe is way over the top, and uncalled for, as you don't know enough details to condemn him like that.

Back OT, I am wondering what the two holes are that the water is draining from in the first pictures you posted of the boat sitting on the trailer.
 

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That diatribe is way over the top, and uncalled for, as you don't know enough details to condemn him like that.

Back OT, I am wondering what the two holes are that the water is draining from in the first pictures you posted of the boat sitting on the trailer.
You are entitled to your diatribe as I am mine. Your opinion is noted.

Proof is in the results. 4 individuals with life jackets on and 150 gallons in an untestedboat.
 

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......I am wondering what the two holes are that the water is draining from in the first pictures you posted of the boat sitting on the trailer.
As I understand the OP, these were the cockpit scuppers. Is that right?

This would mean that water completely filled the cabin, came up on the cockpit floor and only the cockpit drained out.

That seems odd, not to mention extreme.

Do these scuppers have hoses that lead from the cockpit to the hull? Some do, some are molded in. Looks like the outlet is below the water line, so it too is suspect to have actually caused the leak.

A 1" hole that is 2ft below the surface will flow at the rate of 28 gallons per minute. Obviously, the OP's leak was much smaller or shallower, as they would have never been out for the half hour they describe, with any easily noticeable hole.
 

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One additional item in the second pic in your post #12. That is a gate valve (and plastic!) and needs to be changed to a proper seacock.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
......I am wondering what the two holes are that the water is draining from in the first pictures you posted of the boat sitting on the trailer.
As I understand the OP, these were the cockpit scuppers. Is that right?

This would mean that water completely filled the cabin, came up on the cockpit floor and only the cockpit drained out.

That seems odd, not to mention extreme.

Do these scuppers have hoses that lead from the cockpit to the hull? Some do, some are molded in. Looks like the outlet is below the water line, so it too is suspect to have actually caused the leak.

A 1" hole that is 2ft below the surface will flow at the rate of 28 gallons per minute. Obviously, the OP's leak was much smaller or shallower, as they would have never been out for the half hour they describe, with any easily noticeable hole.
I believe you are correct. Those scuppers lead to holes just below the waterline. To access the back side they are behind a wood panel that blocks the fore side of the lazarettes. There is no reason to have below water through hull fittings on this boat.

There was no water at my feet in the cockpit. Obviously there is a break in those hoses. When the boat was on the trailer it wasn't forward and tilted aft having the water pour out. Once the boat was level those holes were much higher than the water level in the cabin.

I will be plugging those holes and the sink drain.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #26
One additional item in the second pic in your post #12. That is a gate valve (and plastic!) and needs to be changed to a proper seacock.
Thanks Jim, yeah that will be removed. No reason to drain a sink below the waterline. That's why we use Purell on board. No sink needed for quick bathroom usage.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Ok you don’t get it.....as evidenced by making excuses for what you did. You did something very unsafe.
That diatribe is way over the top, and uncalled for, as you don't know enough details to condemn him like that.

Back OT, I am wondering what the two holes are that the water is draining from in the first pictures you posted of the boat sitting on the trailer.
Thanks Tim, you were correct, Missing something so ridiculously obvious at the time!
 

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I really do not understand why many have the need to go off on topics like this. He asked for help on where the water was coming in. He obviously knew he should have checked the boat out better before he got in it, and certainly before a full complement of people were out on the lake. Then the holier than thou group jumps in and tells the guy who is on his first sailboat how a true "captain" would never make this mistake. It is kind of like going to church for the spiritual aspect and getting a sermon on politics.

Recently saw a quote that has been attributed to many, but my favorite was Winnie the Pooh.
"Good judgement comes from experience. Experience?....that comes from poor judgement".

Give the guy as break. How many people here have not done some dumb ass stunt that has put ourselves or others at risk? Or do you lie to yourself about it?
 

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Ok you don’t get it.....as evidenced by making excuses for what you did.
You did something very unsafe.

The CAPTAIN is the one who is responsible. Period
Your decisions MUST always be made with safety in mind first. You failed to do that and were pressured by another person to take guests on an unproven to you boat you had never previously tested. You should have said no.

So what is was a lake .
so what it was calm.
So what it was good weather

You took out an untested boat you don’t know well with passengers and endangered everyone. Had someone gotten hurt or injured in this escapade who do you think would be held liable?
YOU WOULD

Thankfully nothing really happened. You get a second chance. If you don’t correct this poor judgement decision starting by owning it , you will repeat. The water is not forgiving, not prejudiced and should be respected. If not your life....than others.

Sorry to be so blunt....b
Sorry to be blunt , but your a arrogant a**hole, they definitely banned the wrong person , smack would have suggested solutions not stand on top of his dockbox and preach a unneeded sermon.

Seeing winters coming plan on replacing all below waterline hoses , you don't have many so cost will be minimal, all new clamps, put proper seacock(s) on , and seeing you have a trailer sailor when your ready pick a dead day at the lake , leave the boat hooked to the cable on the trailer stay right at the ramp , grab a six pack , and watch for water ingress , if you drink the whole six pack and have no water inside , time to try some maneuvers with someone poking around down below to see if anything happens turning to port/then starboard , centerboard down then up ...
 

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Thanks Tim, you were correct, Missing something so ridiculously obvious at the time!
Mister don't run with the scissors here (you know the guy who usually gets stabbed when the person running with the scissors turns to ask why they shouldn't run with a pair of scissors in their hand).

When I got my current boat which had been sitting for years unattended I started by replacing the rigging but then got my phone and stuck my arm in every access point and snapped pictures of every place I could and could not see reviewing them on a computer monitor enlarged and brightened. Things that looked questionable in any fashion were removed and re-bedded at the least with some replaced. Mine is a picnic boat so it was even harder to inspect under the cockpit with very few inspection ports and no lazeretts that one could open. Having an in transom rudder that exited the hull below the water line I cleaned up the seal area on that, replaced the bedding and added a collar outside where it exited the hull to give it even more sealing area and to reinforce it. After I washed out the bilges I put the bilge plug in, filled the boat to the water line with fresh water and inspected for any drips or damp areas on the outside of the hull and found none. Water did not come out of the cockpit scupper thu-hull when there was only water in the bilge which is as it should be.

When launch day finally came I put it out and tied it to the dock for a few hours while I inspected for any leaks or seepage and finding none then I buddied up with a well seasoned sailor and we took the boat out for a trial and the only event was that 2 senior citizens went out sailing a 15 picnic boat in 15 mph winds coming back with smiles on their faces.

I believe you learned that you have to inspect and double check every hose and fitting on that hull and probably have some bedding and old hose to replace along with some corrections of questionable repairs done by previous owners and possibly a through hull to replace. Each spring when you get the boat ready for the water you will need to inspect those hoses and thu-hulls again. On first launch of the season allow time for the boat to sit at the dock for enough time to inspect for water coming in. Be mindful that plugging a thru-hull that's not bedded correctly is not going to stop it from leaking between it and the hull. Also make regular checks of the centerboard trunk along with the centerboard cable seal, pivot and lock pin areas for leaking or fracturing. Also check the leading edge of the centerboard trunk for any signs of damage as many times the centerboard can slam that area and crack the glass.

Continue inspecting and be mindful of how things are supposed to work and don't arbitrarily start plugging everything as you may find yourself doing a lot of bailing when water splashes in the boat. Its not a lot of fun when a self bailing cockpit doesn't drain and every bit of water that splashes over the bow or rail just builds up around your feet. Note that a water scoop made out of an old bleach bottle (milk bottles are too flimsy) can be a wonderful thing to have on board just in case.

Have fun with it and I believe most here will be looking forward to when you report you've found and slayed the dragon.
 

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You don’t want to plug off the scuppers. Correct whatever is leaking. They are designed to drain the cockpit, if and when you get water aboard. It will happen. Most drain below the water line.
 

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I took both my kids sailing as babies. My youngest is 4 and a half months and she has done lots of protected water sailing.

This is the baby lifejacket I use. Rated 9lbs and up.
I have thought about taking a baby sailing since a racing partner brought his newborn out racing once. The baby sat in his car seat down below wedged between the large pile of crew gear bags. I was wondering if the car seat would float if something went wrong.

https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5013-812/Baby-PFD

I am wondering how will this life jacket would work if it was really needed? Has it been baby tested in calm or rough conditions? Does the baby float head out of the water?
 

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Seeing winters coming plan on replacing all below waterline hoses , you don't have many so cost will be minimal, all new clamps, put proper seacock(s) on , and seeing you have a trailer sailor when your ready pick a dead day at the lake , leave the boat hooked to the cable on the trailer stay right at the ramp , grab a six pack , and watch for water ingress , if you drink the whole six pack and have no water inside , time to try some maneuvers with someone poking around down below to see if anything happens turning to port/then starboard , centerboard down then up ...
This in water test is a good idea. I would suggest doing it now instead of waiting till spring. My guess is making all the hoses right will fix the leaking issue, but it would suck to wait till spring to find out the leak is in the centerboard trunk or elsewhere.
 

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Sorry to be blunt , but your a arrogant a**hole, they definitely banned the wrong person , smack would have suggested solutions not stand on top of his dockbox and preach a unneeded sermon.

Seeing winters coming plan on replacing all below waterline hoses , you don't have many so cost will be minimal, all new clamps, put proper seacock(s) on , and seeing you have a trailer sailor when your ready pick a dead day at the lake , leave the boat hooked to the cable on the trailer stay right at the ramp , grab a six pack , and watch for water ingress , if you drink the whole six pack and have no water inside , time to try some maneuvers with someone poking around down below to see if anything happens turning to port/then starboard , centerboard down then up ...
The right person was banned. He was a multiple offender . That doesn’t need to be rehashed and is irrelevant. Guess you are still stewing about that. Give it up.

You seem to be intolerant of others opinions. What’s inappropriate is calling someone an *******. Try and show some class, if you can. Everyone has a right to voice their opinion within the TOS, which I did.

Others have already mentioned the possible solutions to correct the problems which the OP has found with his boat. It still doesn’t take away from the actions.

I hope he can correct the issues and enjoy his Sailboat with safety.
 

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Mister don't run with the scissors here (you know the guy who usually gets stabbed when the person running with the scissors turns to ask why they shouldn't run with a pair of scissors in their hand).

When I got my current boat which had been sitting for years unattended I started by replacing the rigging but then got my phone and stuck my arm in every access point and snapped pictures of every place I could and could not see reviewing them on a computer monitor enlarged and brightened. Things that looked questionable in any fashion were removed and re-bedded at the least with some replaced. Mine is a picnic boat so it was even harder to inspect under the cockpit with very few inspection ports and no lazeretts that one could open. Having an in transom rudder that exited the hull below the water line I cleaned up the seal area on that, replaced the bedding and added a collar outside where it exited the hull to give it even more sealing area and to reinforce it. After I washed out the bilges I put the bilge plug in, filled the boat to the water line with fresh water and inspected for any drips or damp areas on the outside of the hull and found none. Water did not come out of the cockpit scupper thu-hull when there was only water in the bilge which is as it should be.

When launch day finally came I put it out and tied it to the dock for a few hours while I inspected for any leaks or seepage and finding none then I buddied up with a well seasoned sailor and we took the boat out for a trial and the only event was that 2 senior citizens went out sailing a 15 picnic boat in 15 mph winds coming back with smiles on their faces.

I believe you learned that you have to inspect and double check every hose and fitting on that hull and probably have some bedding and old hose to replace along with some corrections of questionable repairs done by previous owners and possibly a through hull to replace. Each spring when you get the boat ready for the water you will need to inspect those hoses and thu-hulls again. On first launch of the season allow time for the boat to sit at the dock for enough time to inspect for water coming in. Be mindful that plugging a thru-hull that's not bedded correctly is not going to stop it from leaking between it and the hull. Also make regular checks of the centerboard trunk along with the centerboard cable seal, pivot and lock pin areas for leaking or fracturing. Also check the leading edge of the centerboard trunk for any signs of damage as many times the centerboard can slam that area and crack the glass.

Continue inspecting and be mindful of how things are supposed to work and don't arbitrarily start plugging everything as you may find yourself doing a lot of bailing when water splashes in the boat. Its not a lot of fun when a self bailing cockpit doesn't drain and every bit of water that splashes over the bow or rail just builds up around your feet. Note that a water scoop made out of an old bleach bottle (milk bottles are too flimsy) can be a wonderful thing to have on board just in case.

Have fun with it and I believe most here will be looking forward to when you report you've found and slayed the dragon.
Good advice, , especially about checking things out for a few minutes when dropping the boat in the water.
 

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I felt compelled to relate a story which originated the day of our first launch over 20 years ago. After splashing our boat in Midland, we motored and then sailed back to Honey Harbour where we would be keeping the boat. Before starting the 3 hour drive home, we went for a bite to eat. Before hitting the road, I suggested that we have one more quick peek at our new treasure. Removing the hatch boards, I immediately could see that the floor was awash.
The OMC Saildrive motor has a drain plug which is opened for winterizing...the previous owner had not mentioned this. The plug was letting water in from the moment the boat was in the water but because the water was flowing into the channel to the bilge, we hadn't seen it. While we were eating, the water overflowed the bilge, at that time the boat did not have an automatic float switch.
Had we not gone back to the ship for 'one last look', our boat would surely have flooded and sunk.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
I have thought about taking a baby sailing since a racing partner brought his newborn out racing once. The baby sat in his car seat down below wedged between the large pile of crew gear bags. I was wondering if the car seat would float if something went wrong.

https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5013-812/Baby-PFD

I am wondering how will this life jacket would work if it was really needed? Has it been baby tested in calm or rough conditions? Does the baby float head out of the water?
Most child or infant PFD's are Type 1 which most likely can turn an unconscious person head up in the water.
 

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I will be plugging those holes and the sink drain.
You seem to want to just plug everything. Why not just fix them correctly?
 

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Discussion Starter #39 (Edited)
The sink drain is a useless through hull hole IMO. In 1983 when the boat was new it might have been a good idea. I don't see the value in having a sink that expels water out through a possible area that could lead to water entering the boat unnecessarily. I have a small head on my other boat and we just use hand sanitizer to wash up with. I could keep the sink with a small waste water tank underneath also. No reason to release the gray water overboard. (Or under board in this case) Also plugging that hole will bypass the plastic valve and I can remove it and free up a few more cubic inches of space.

Am I missing the value here?

The back scuppers where I believe the water entered (I will be removing panels inside to access the drains and check it out later this week hopefully) also don't pose a lot of value. The PO must have used expandable drain plugs for this. They aren't threaded. I've had scuppers lead aft through the transom above the water line which makes tons of sense. That's why I didn't expect them to be facing under the stern.

If you left the boat on a trailer I imagine those drains would let rain water out. I always keep my boats covered in and out of water.

I may use drain plugs and make sure the holes in the cockpit run to the bilge. I also dont mind the bleach bottle idea as an option to bail it out.

Additionally I'm going to replace the hose, the clamps and the line that controls the centerboard.

I want to try and sort some of these issues before the winter. Next trip to the water will only be to check for water entering after I go through it again.
 

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It's your boat, but I think you're devaluing it by plugging those off. Most would want them and find the DIY approach as a yellow flag to other less identifiable oddities.

Cockpit scuppers are supposed to allow a cockpit to drain overboard. It has to violate some best practice or code to block them off.

A sink that doesn't drain calls into question why there is a sink installed at all. On many small sailboats, I see it filled with ice and storing beverages for the day sail. A drain would be nice.

Captain's choice, but I would repair them correctly and you'd have little worry. The fact is, unless you grind back a 12 inch bevel, plug and re-fiberglass the hole, anything you do could also leak.

p.s. I'm sure a bilge check will be on your list of things to do at every launch now. I do so every time I return to the boat, either at the slip or at anchor. It takes a second.
 
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