SailNet Community banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
594 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,491 Posts
Hmmm....

I want to know the REAL power requirements, its dimensionals and its durability in my chosen "outside".

I am debating the merits of a watermaker precisely because of the cost, the added maintenance, the size and the fact I already carry 200 gallons in four tanks... I could easily just filter rain through awnings...but if something in essence condensed 10 litres of drinking water per day...that would cover our physical needs, leaving "town/island/rain water" for washing and bathing.

Thanks, Jim!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Seems a little power hungry for the cruising boat. They claim it cost $.03-.04 per liter to make. I pay $.104/kw to the power company. That's 30% of 1kw or 300w to make a liter, at 12 liters a day that is 150w an hour all day long or 12.5 amps on a 12v battery. OUCH...

Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
It smells like snake oil to me. I looked over the web site, not a speck of specific info, just a lot of hype about how important water is. My hunch is that the laws of physics that determine things like evaporation and condensation will not bend to the hype. My home dehumidifier makes a few liters of water everyday for about ten amps of power.

If there was a quantum leap in technology to reduce the power requirement there might actually be a bigger market for small, low power dehumidification equipment.
 

·
Telstar 28
Joined
·
993 Posts
The Watermill really doesn't make much sense for a boat. An RO watermaker, like the Pur/Katadyn PowerSurvivor 40E, which can be manually operated in a pinch, only uses 4 amps per hour and makes 5+ liters per hour. So you could run it three hours, get your twelve liters and have enough to back flush the RO membrane. :) It is also smaller than the Watermill by the looks of it.

The one major advantage of the watermill would be that it would work in the harbor, where most RO watermakers shouldn't be used, due to contaminants in the water—oil, bacteria, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,491 Posts
The Power/Survivor 40E is about the only game in town for the size I want, as it could be disconnected and chucked in a liferaft...if you had time.

Or just to given exercise to the crew, maybe!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
This is not for the boat use.
"uses the electricity of about three light bulbs " - that is probably 300W. Bit even if it is only 150W it is way to much for any practical use on the boat.
150W equals 12,4A at 12V. This equals to 300 Ah every day (for only 12l).
More likely it is 600 Ah per day. (if it is 300W).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
594 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The Power/Survivor 40E is about the only game in town for the size I want, as it could be disconnected and chucked in a liferaft...if you had time.
I'm thinking of looking at the 40E again at the Earl's Court boatshow this weekend. If you install one, post some pictures, because I'm curious about how small of space it could go into (without being impossible to service).

Here's some examples:

This seems to take up a hanging locker, with other pumps:


This one looks like it's installed under the head (???):


This is a view from the manufacturer:


This isn't a 40e, but it is using space that is sometimes wasted:


This one puts the pressure vessel vertically:


I wonder if the vessel could be mounted vertically behind a settee or something-- to reduce space, or in an area of the stern where there is open space.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,491 Posts
Good questions, but it's a real commitment however you do it. I would mount anything like that in my engine bay, close to the tanks, and because I could easily T into the existing raw water circuit.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top