SailNet Community banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recently bought a cs22 to use as a daysailer primarily on lake Muskoka and in the great lakes occasionally. I am thinking of getting a new main from one of the online sailmakers (precision sails), and I can get a radial for not much more than a crosscut. Is it worth it? The boat came with two mainsails, one is in decent shape and the other is rather tired looking.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,267 Posts
The answer is dependent on how you plan to use the boat and why you think that you need a new mainsail. After all, if you have one mainsail that is in good shape, I don't know why you are buying a new sail.

Generally radially cut sails become more compelling for bigger boats, boats that are sailed in heavier winds, or boats that are raced. For those situations the lower stretch and longer durability based on retraining it's shape a lot longer, the minimally more expensive price of a radially cut sail would seem like a bargain.

I should note that these days, well made cross cut sails have radially cut corners.

Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,398 Posts
I love the look of all the new sail designs... and I am sure that the technology has improved. However what sails you use, how old they are and so on should be informed by HOW you sail. Racers want the latest and greatest cutting edge technology because they are looking for every tenth or even hundredth of a knot. Weekend sailors or cruisers concerns are looking for robust and reliable and these tend to be heavier from the get go.

All things being equal (they never are) radial cut seems to maintain sail shape better... but they are wasteful of material (I assume) and will cost more. Labor is likely higher as well.

As a cruiser I can think of better things to spend my boat dollars on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
If the cost isn't too much more, I'd go with the radial. From what I understand it will last longer, so if you plan to keep this sail for 10 or 15 years, it will maintain it's shape better. That's why I went with tri-radial on my boat.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
8,680 Posts
I don't think this response will be especially helpful to the OP, but others may find it useful.
We replaced our RF main last year and I went with the cheaper cut. As our original main was radial cut, I've come to believe that this was a big mistake for an RF main, as the radial cut held its shape better when reefed and will for longer in general.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top