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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I admit, the SA thread spurred me to ask...but this is something I've struggled with too.

While the racing bug has bitten me...I like to cruise just as much.
It seems like the majority of sailors have chosen to mostly go one way...and scoff at the other.

I rarely see my diehard racing friends out with pals enjoying the breeze on a random day...and they've referred to boats like mine (with sleepable berths, enclosed heads & comfy cabin feel) as "furniture."

Dare I ask...Is it possible to love both?
 

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Hell yeah! Why not? To me it seems it inevitably comes down to whether you really want to be "competitive" in either/both. But with some compromise/balance - what's stopping you? Race your "cruiser". Cruise your "racer". It's all good!
 

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Sure it is.

Most of us are cruisers until another boat heaves over the horizon and we then become racers! (g)

There is a point to be made there, though. I'm always suspicious of someone who says they're just a cruiser with no real interest in getting the most speed out of their boat. Do they mean it or are they just lazy?

Those whom are just racers burn out. I suspect as most do on racing alone, in any sport. For them it's not the specific mode of racing, it's the racing alone.

I think most of us are like you and much of our angst regarding choosing a boat reflects the balancing of those two often separate goals of speed over comfort. The boat manufacturers sure know about it; it's impossible to find any boat in the world that is not a racer/cruiser. Just look at their adverts!
 

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Both you Bendy toy and my Jeanneau from the same mid 80's era, are classic racer/cruisers. Nice interiors, decent speed. Can shame a few on the course if you have the right crew etc. Nothing wrong with the ability to do both!

Where I am at, it is nice to sail across puget sound, about 6'ish miles from Edmonds to Kingston, have dinner, sail home. Then again, local club has little bouy races that can be fun. About every weekend of the yr, there is a race somewhere on Puget sound with in 3-6 hrs if you really want to do that along with it.

The San Juans up into the Canadian equals, some of the best cruising grounds around, once you figure out the tides and currents..........

Yes possible to do both. Fortunetly some newer designs are coming out with the ability to do both. Not just being a sled, ie a melges, or a cruiser, seems like the rest!

Marty
 

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Midwest Puddle Pirate
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I race my cruiser 4-5 times a year and I crew on my friends boat for the races every other weekend. The only downside is that my wife can't figure out why I'm constantly trimming and adjusting for the "lake swirl" winds. She sees no point in getting that last .1 knot while heading down the lake with the kids. Once you love the racing, you can't help it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I race my cruiser 4-5 times a year and I crew on my friends boat for the races every other weekend. The only downside is that my wife can't figure out why I'm constantly trimming and adjusting for the "lake swirl" winds. She sees no point in getting that last .1 knot while heading down the lake with the kids. Once you love the racing, you can't help it.
I catch regular flack for this too.
 

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Alex is a high profile person on here doing both. But reality is, many others on here do something similar or equal in their boats, at the level they are able to do.

The ability to do both is definitely there!

Marty
 

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It shouldn't be too hard to reconcile this philosophically. All boats and ships, regardless of their purpose, used to be racers. All of them were designed for a purpose and then designed to spend the minimum time at sea accomplishing it in the most productive way. No one designed something to be lived upon just for the living upon of it! (g)

This explains everything from the Australian wool clippers to the Down East fishing schooners, to the America, the SS United States, and today's high speed ferries.

We're a little confused today. We've passenger ships that go on cruises that amount to nothing more than heading out over the horizon and doing circles in the water. Likewise we have boats that are designed to sail as a secondary function. We're rightfully bored with both.

Back to the advert. game. You notice how no one advertises a "slow cruiser"? (g)
 

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What two boats sailing within sight of each other are not racing?

In my opinion, I guess it depends on how competitive you are if you will be happy with the compromise. I am very competitive and like to go fast, but as long as there are other boats in a class that I could sail against head-to-head, I can be satisfied. I would get bored pretty quickly if I was only able to compete on corrected time.
Speed is relative and you don't have to be on a sport boat to feel the adrenaline rush from a close contest.
 

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Yes, you can be a cruiser and a racer. However there are some pit falls one needs to be aware of, like a BBQ on the stern rail. The racers will not take you serious. With out the BBQ the cruisers won't take you serious. Yes It can be confusing, like raising the yellow protest flag to a passing powerboat who forces you alter your course and then you realize your not racing.

Another one to watch out for is the urge to yell starboard tack to any sailboat with in 100 yards of you.

If you can keep these things in check you will be OK.
 

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"Two ships pass in the night, no one notices. Two ships pass in the day, it's a race."

Absolutly, you can do both. It really is a matter of degrees. Yes some boats are set-up to for one option or the other, but most of us have boats that were specificlly designed to ride the fence between the two modes of sailing.

Sometimes you have to make minor modifications to your cruising boat to race. There is a guy in our harbor that keeps his boat on a mooring. He occationally likes to join in the Saturday morning races. I regularly see him row out to his mooring and then off load 200 ft. of chain rode into his dingy before the start. Me, I keep a cardboard mock-up of a BBQ on the stern rail so I look like a cruiser, but without the weigt.:D
 

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While the racing bug has bitten me...I like to cruise just as much.
...
Dare I ask...Is it possible to love both?
I don't see why not--The Admiral and I do. In fact: It was a requirement on the part of The-Admiral-To-Be that whatever boat we bought be a performance boat. She didn't want to be sailing a "tub." We ended-up with a Pearson P30, described by Jack Horner as "...an attempt to meld the attributes of racing boats with those of family cruisers--sort of like rigging a mini-van to race at Indy." And, by all accounts, they succeeded. However: Such a boat is not going to be as fast as a pure race boat, nor as comfortable as a cruiser. Such is the way of compromises. Likewise: We'll probably never (attempt to) live on her for months at a time (we're still working up to a whole weekend), nor will we likely race the Mackinac with her. (Tho that latter is certainly easily w/in her capibilities.)

So, yes: You can love both, and you can have a boat that will do both "adequately," IMO. We have people in our club that do only one or the other, and others that do both.

Jim
 

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The perfect boat to do cruising and racing is of course the catamaran.

I'm perhaps somewhat biased on that, but which of you can top 10 knts in 15 kts of wind sailing single handed while your Admiral sleeps on a queen sized bed in a air conditioned boat; taking time from the helm to go in and get ice cubes you just made in your propane powered Refridge to refresh the Rum and Zero that you left just sitting around on the helm station?

Oh, and do it pointing 40 degrees off the wind.

Non-believers are welcome to come sailing with me, I've already posted the photo-evidence :)
 

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Chuckles- The obvious problem there is you can only race if there is another cat to race against. PHRF doesn't handle multi-hulls well if at all and I think I'm safe in saying the sailchick- isn't likely to find anyother multi's to race against.
 

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PHRF SMURF

PHRF is a guideline, subject to modification and interpretation :)

I only 'race' locally if the winds are less than 12 kts, I can't plane in that low a breeze so I'm limited to hull speed. Makes it fair, mostly. I'll admit as commodore of my yacht club I can stretch the rules somewhat.

On the other hand, I 'race' every boat I'm on a similar course to, and often change course just to have a little fun. I win some, I lose some as I'm an indifferent racer.

For my local club, we use 174 as my PHRF, no screecher allowed. We (Race chair and I) arrived at that by sailing along side a boat rated at 177 in 10 knts of air, completing a triangle and hanging within 10 feet of relative starting positions. The other boat was a Islander 37, 150 genoa, both boats with clean bottoms. I am not eligible for trophies and such, and generally start at the 5 minute warning to stay clear of them that are eligible.
I cross the line at finish, hit my stopwatch and if the gun for the winner goes off more than 5 minutes later I figure I won line honors. It's the best I can do.

Keep in mind that I'm single handing a condo-cat against race crewed boats and only doing it for fun (and a little nose rubbing in the waves).

There are 118 KNOWN Gemini's on the Lakes for a starter. Multi's will eventually rule.

There are 4 Gemini's on my local river, two in my yacht club.

Google 'multihull racing chicago' then check out the FLEETS that are there.
 
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