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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are general thoughts on maintaining a career with embarking on a crusing lifestyle?

I have taken time off from work before to pursue different interests in the past. When reentering the workforce, I found some potential employers seem to be overly concerned about the gap in my employment history. More frequently, lots of them seem to have issues with me taking jobs that are not exactly in the same field. I am talking about jobs in financial reporting vs. credit analysis, which to me, are both in the finance field, using very similar skillset. But to lots of potential employers, these jobs might as well be in the opposite ends of the earth.

My plan is to cruise for a season or two, returning to work for a few years, then repeating the cycle. However, I do have some concerns due to the issues I had experienced when re-entering the workforce.

Any thoughts?
 

bell ringer
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Thoughts - mine are that it gets harder and harder to return to work as you get older. This a main concern for me to stop working to go cruising, if my money assumptions are wrong whether I could even find a job in my field. Or if post cruising work involves Walmart instead.
 

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You are right to be concerned...employers have enough self destructive rules to eliminate candidates as it is....

As a "cruiser" or any other different lifestyle choice will be fully questioned by the HR dweeb and their computer program. They care not about why there is a gap, only that you are not normal by having one.

Throw in some "age" and you will have likely created a continuous gap in your employment.

The employers are not interested in the non-conformist.
 

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I always thought the best time to cruise is in your early twenties, and then again in you late fifties or early sixties, and be retired. That way you don't have that gap in your power earning years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I guess its necessary to bypass HR when job hunting. Most of my job offers came because I managed to get the attention of the hiring person through networking or cold calling. Of course applying on company websites or recruiters also yield results sometimes. I can see also the importance of keeping in touch with old colleagues. But, yes, I think companies just have too many damn rules that tend to not favor the non-conformists.
 

Old soul
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I just quit my 'job' yesterday (a long-term, well-paying contract). I don't expect to be able to come back to any work that would get me anything near I was making. My wife is in the same process, although her complete departure will take a bit longer.

Am I scared? HELL YES!

But for the first time in years I feel quite alive and invigorated. I haven't step off into the unknown in 20 years. This is gonna be fun -- I hope :).

I won't pretend to tell anyone what is right for them. I do know that the one thing you can't get back is time. That's why we're going now.
 

Closet Powerboater
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Who says there needs to be a gap in your resume? Perhaps you were an independent consultant specializing in finance. You don't have to be successful, (or even try) but it may look better on paper. Get a business license and a cheapo website if you like to give it more substance. If they seem like they're open to something different then let them know what you were really doing with most of your time with consulting being on the side.

In my immediate team of co-workers there are 5 of us. 1 lives on a boat, and 1 (me) lived on a boat for 10 years. I didn't put the boat bum thing front and center on my resume, but once the senior VPs started saying how cool they thought it was that my colleague lives on a boat, I chimed in too. Now they think we're both great. So, you never know how they'll react.

MedSailor
 

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This month for the first time ever I was questioned about my series of contract jobs. Three times the assumption was that I didn't want to stay at a job too long before moving on so why hire me? The first never got to the interview stage, I found out through a friend who worked at the company. That company valued "lifers" so my resume didn't look like I'd fit in. Nevermind that I was qualified and that they never even asked me. Luckily, I was able to explain face to face the next times that I was contracting because very few are hiring permanent employees in my field and I had to point out that when I was offered a permanent FT position, I happily accepted it.

It's almost as if the bad job market never happened or some people who managed to stay with the same company through it have no idea what it's like out there.
 

Not Finished Yet
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Ad MedSailor states, it is pretty easy to make a gap in your resume disappear if you desire. Do some volunteer work, do some part-time consulting, do a part-time contract. You can stay involved and up-to-date in your career in many ways besides a conventional 40 hour for salary workweek.

After my last sabbatical, I seriously blundered in my first interview. Questions that with no gap I never would have missed I was stumped on. It was extremely embarrassing. In the future I will for sure keep a toe in the water while on sabbatical.

That said, remote working full time while cruising would take 90% of the fun out of cruising for me. I would much rather sit at a marina in [insert favorite paradise here] with a reliable internet connection than I would try to cruise while tele-commuting. I would find the later way to stressful. That may change when we get reliable, affordable, high-speed, global internet.
 

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What are general thoughts on maintaining a career with embarking on a crusing lifestyle?

My plan is to cruise for a season or two, returning to work for a few years, then repeating the cycle. However, I do have some concerns due to the issues I had experienced when re-entering the workforce.

Any thoughts?
Depends where you want to work and how much you want to make. In Chicago or New York you're expected to be career focused. If you're not career focused, then get out. Go to Hawaii, Boulder Colorado, Key West, or other places and you'll see a far different reaction. Essentially you can just look around where you are. If everyone is focused on career then you'll also be expected to think the same.

You're actually in a luxury position. There are finance people everywhere, like taxi drivers. If you wanted to be a nuclear physicist you'd have far fewer options. There are very few "part time" brain surgeons.

GTJ
 

Bombay Explorer 44
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I went cruising for 7 years in my 40s. I was in a specialized and contracting area in education. I knew it would be hard if not impossible to get back in that area so did a MSc in Computer Education.

I could pick and choose when I got back.

Mind you I did dread the question.

Now what skills have you learned in the last seven years that you can bring to this position.

I don't suppose becoming a good shot with a speargun and knowing how to bribe a South American ports official would have impressed them.
 

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1981 Endeavour 32
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I just quit my 'job' yesterday (a long-term, well-paying contract). I don't expect to be able to come back to any work that would get me anything near I was making. My wife is in the same process, although her complete departure will take a bit longer.

Am I scared? HELL YES!

But for the first time in years I feel quite alive and invigorated. I haven't step off into the unknown in 20 years. This is gonna be fun -- I hope :).

I won't pretend to tell anyone what is right for them. I do know that the one thing you can't get back is time. That's why we're going now.
Congratulations Mike....we should be throwing you a Party!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
SailingJackson wrote:

"Depends where you want to work and how much you want to make. In Chicago or New York you're expected to be career focused. If you're not career focused, then get out. Go to Hawaii, Boulder Colorado, Key West, or other places and you'll see a far different reaction."

The problem is there are few well paying jobs in Hawaii, Boulder Colorado, or Key West. Maybe west coast (LA, Bay Area, Seattle) have companies that are more open to people with cruising lifestyle, and also offer well paying jobs?

TQA wrote:

"I went cruising for 7 years in my 40s. I was in a specialized and contracting area in education. I knew it would be hard if not impossible to get back in that area so did a MSc in Computer Education. I could pick and choose when I got back."

You did a MSc in computer in your mid 40s? And you were competitive with the young programmers swarming silicon valley?
 

Not Finished Yet
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You did a MSc in computer in your mid 40s? And you were competitive with the young programmers swarming silicon valley?
I think that was a degree in Computer Education, not computer science. Very different fields.

Currently someone with a degree and experience in Computer Science can always find a good job, not matter what their age. There are still way more jobs than people to fill them. This shortage is projected to get worse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
I think that was a degree in Computer Education, not computer science. Very different fields.

Currently someone with a degree and experience in Computer Science can always find a good job, not matter what their age. There are still way more jobs than people to fill them. This shortage is projected to get worse.
I see. I misread his posting. But honestly, there are very few degrees out there that one can get and become immediately qualified for numerous jobs. Most jobs require applicable degree plus relevant experience.

Based on what I had seen in finance, I feel the more experience I have, fewer jobs become available to me. In the minds of potential employers, I am now more specialized. Most companies are simply not interested in someone if he lacks the very specific skills outlined for the job, even if that person has been successful in related fields, and can clearly pick up the stuff in no time. In other words, they are looking for a specialist for a specialized job. And this presents a signifcant amount of friction to someone moving in and out of cruising lifestyle, because it takes much longer to find that match between the specialist and the specialized job.

And this reminds me of the joke, that the expert focuses on such narrow area, that he actually knows nothing.
 

Closet Powerboater
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I see. I misread his posting. But honestly, there are very few degrees out there that one can get and become immediately qualified for numerous jobs. Most jobs require applicable degree plus relevant experience.
I respectfully disagree with you here. There are many degrees, and many more certifications, that will land you immediate employment right out of school. I spent the better part of 2 years unemployed after the dotcom bust in the Seattle area (I was an IT guy) and I went to my local technical college and a couple months later I was certified as an EMT. I think the classes cost less than $1,000 and upon graduation I had plenty of job offers with no experience.

After that, I went to school to become a Physican Assistant. Looking for jobs in the worst economic downturn since the great depression? No problem. It's the second most in-demand job in america (after programmer). I got a cold call a couple days ago from a doc that wants to hire me that got my name from another doc I've never even met.

Other certifications and degrees that will land you instant and gainful employment without any experience are:
Nurse
Physical therapist
Ultrasound tech
Echo cardiology tech
Surgical Tech
Medical coding and billing

I'm sure there are other, non-medical fields that can produce the same type of employment, though currently medicine is where a lot of money is. I pity the kids that are getting liberal arts degrees and graduating with 6 figures in debt. Having attended both university and community college I was more impressed with the community college to be honest. They really seemed more focused on getting you trained in a skill, and if it was an in demand skill, you have a job.

Medsailor
 

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And this reminds me of the joke, that the expert focuses on such narrow area, that he actually knows nothing.
Two brothers. One stayed and worked the farm and as he grew older he learned less and less about more and more till at the end of his life he knew almost nothing about nearly everything. His brother became a research scientist learning more and more about less and less till at the end of his life he knew almost everything about practically nothing.
 

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the hospitality industry has long been a standard and example of a trade and skill that can be "returned to" I have done it many times now mostly in my twenties....

I came back to it after extensive travelling and always if skilled and responsible to a great job and trade...

someone else posted about the ideal ages to do this there are various ways to do it...

I now feel that my productive years will be the 40s hopefully my 50s will be a permanent return to cruising in some way after retirement but I just cant plan that far ahead now

too hard! jajaja
 
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