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To clarify my point, one only needs the former document aboard, if it was formerly documented.
 

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In our case, we ARE the owners of the boat. Backed up with a notarized CG bill of sale, and a notarized letter from the previous owners describing the situation (and insurance certificates in our name, if they needed more). The documentation was current for the boat. Putting our names on the forms as owners was truthful and legal. Doing otherwise would have been illegal.

It isn't really possible/practical to get new CG documentation in the Caribe during a US government shutdown. Even during normal operations, it often isn't possible to Fedex the required documents to the CG and get the new documentation back before one's cruising permit expires and they need to leave the country with the boat. This was our case - the boat's cruising permit was expiring in a week, and it had already used up its extensions.

Mark
Have you considered writing up a document stating all the info you have imparted here and going to a consulate or Embassy and getting some kind of official stamp on it?
Last I checked the greedy bastar*s wanted $50.00US for a notary stamp, but it might be worth it. I'd do it for free, but my notary has expired.
 

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Have you considered writing up a document stating all the info you have imparted here and going to a consulate or Embassy and getting some kind of official stamp on it?
Last I checked the greedy bastar*s wanted $50.00US for a notary stamp, but it might be worth it. I'd do it for free, but my notary has expired.
The CG Bill of Sale has been officially notarized. The note explaining the situation has been officially notarized. The documentation for the boat is current and official. Our insurance certificate is current and official.

I don't see how getting yet another official notarization on all of the above would help any.

Besides, we have been through 3 countries with the above with no problems. Our next stop is the USA, which didn't have any issue with us or the documentation we have when we stopped in the USVI.

Mark
 

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Last I'd heard, if you applied for USCG documentation AND you asked them to expedite the processing because you were leaving port for foreign waters, they had a procedure to do so.

Call them to enquire.
 

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When I cleared into the Bahamas a few weeks ago the customs agent didn’t even glance at my state registration.....just checked that I had filled out their forms completely, stamped my passport, and collected my $150 fee.
Ouch! Is it that expensive everywhere in the Caribbean?
 

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Bahamas
-35 is $150
+35 is $300
Initially good for 3 months and can be renewed twice...another 3 months then another 2 months...8 months max..no cost to renew...includes fishing permit

Gov prefers renewals to be done with immigration dept but can be done with customs. They are 2 different agencies. Not all islands have immigration office.

So...
Could be considered expensive if a short stay but not so for a long visit

Look at BVIs and redefine expensive.
Add up another countrys 'small fees' and multiple x countries visited.
 

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No. The Bahamas are the most expensive by far. I thought it was $300?
The Caribbean is good. $20 here and there, a bit more in places.


Mark
More than a bit more - and the Bahamas are not the most expensive. The French islands are definitely inexpensive, but Grenada is ~$300/yr. If staying more than one month, the BVI's are also $300, as stated previously, plus the costs of moorings in most places. St. Martin is going to get up close to $300 in anchoring fees if staying more than a couple of weeks. Curacao is $300. Turks and Caicos are $400. Central and South America countries are around $300/yr, give or take $50 depending on country. Much of the rest of the Eastern Caribe is going to cost $100-$150 - such as Trinidad, St. Vincent/Grenadines, Dominican Republic, etc - and that isn't including port or mooring/anchoring fees.

Jamaica is free, as is US, USVI, and Puerto Rico, and the Caymans are nominal.

I don't have experience with countries outside those surrounding the Caribbean Sea.

Mark
 

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I cleared into the BVI this winter, with 4 aboard a 51 ft sailboat. $465. Breathtaking. Twice what it was two years earlier in a 45ft sailboat. It's not out of the question I was ripped off.
 
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