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Discussion Starter #1
Our new boat came with a 150 furling genoa, and we find that it is too much sail. We would rather not buy a new sail so is cutting this one down to a 125 or so be a good idea? I talked to a local sail loft and they quoted $400-500 to recut and redo the uv protection. Does that sound like a reasonable way to go?
 

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recut genoa

I had to have mine cut down. The PO did not have UV protection and the seams blew. I am not a racer, so I can't address efficiency and sail shape, but a 150 was a bit big for SF Bay and my boat.

Cost about $400 for the recut and UV protection.
 

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Depending on the size of the sail It does sound pretty reasonable, but another option, if the sail is in good shape, would be to take measurements and check to see if someone is interested in swapping.

Ken.
 

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It may not make sense, depending on the cut of the sail. Some sails, especially more expensive racing sails, are cut in such a way that recutting them is often not a great idea. It might make more sense to sell the sail and have a new sail made.
 

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Because, on many furlers, once you furl up about 30% of the sail, the shape goes to h3ll... it gets fairly baggy and performs poorly in high wind conditions.
If it's a furling sail, why not furl it up a bit when it's windy?
 

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I had mine re-cut down from a 150% to about a 135% because, as in the case of MaestroSid above, the P.O. was late in putting on UV protection and some seams failed.

A local loft did it, and added luff foam to aid in retaining shape when partially reefed. Worked out well.

Had it done in December, when loft was pretty idle. Cost was under $200 for a small sail (boat is 25 ft), they re-used the Sunbrella UV shield.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It may not make sense, depending on the cut of the sail. Some sails, especially more expensive racing sails, are cut in such a way that recutting them is often not a great idea. It might make more sense to sell the sail and have a new sail made.
It's not a racing sail, just a cross cut dacron cruising sail. We thought it would be good for light winds, but it is pretty heavy, and collapses too much. Sounds like having it recut is the way to go. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Because, on many furlers, once you furl up about 30% of the sail, the shape goes to h3ll... it gets fairly baggy and performs poorly in high wind conditions.
Yep, with even just a few wraps, the sail shape goes to crap, and it gets way too baggy. I think we'll just deal with going a little slower in light air, and eventually get an asymmetrical spinnaker.
 

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Because, on many furlers, once you furl up about 30% of the sail, the shape goes to h3ll... it gets fairly baggy and performs poorly in high wind conditions.
Ahhhh last I checked furling a 150 genny down to around 125 wasn't near 30% furled...maybe 15% which might be fine. Wouldn't cost much to add a foam luff to allow the sail to furl better.
 

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Reducing headsail size

Blake,

It would be helpful if you let us know what type of boat this is for and where your sailing area is. Sorry if I missed that but what follows is general. When you build a cross cut dacron sail you select a cloth weight. For a 150% you would use a lighter cloth weight than a 125%. Depending on the size of the boat, I could approximate on the weight differences. The smaller sail may be more reinforced in the corners too. Although it is smaller it is meant to be flown in more wind and will therefore create more loading on the sail. So in the conditions you would be taking down the 150% to fly a smaller, heavier, stronger sail, you may be asking that cut down sail to do a job the fabric wasn't meant to do. Next is the draft position. Based on how old that sail is it has probably moved aft some. Remember also that it started out life somewhat fuller than a 125% would be. The quick and easy way to make this sail smaller is to mark the new clew, fair the leech and foot with long battens pinned into the sail to make the right curves, mark the cut line, cut the sail, resew in the leech tape, rerun the leech line, and redo the reinforcment in the clew and reattach the clew ring. All of that work does nothing to fix the draft position or shape of the sail, it just makes it smaller. To alter the draft position in a cross cut sail, the seams need to be opened up and tapered and resewn. If you have this done, first make sure you are starting with the right weight sail, next determine how the sailmaker will be spending your money. Once you know that, you may decide to sell the sail you have and start from scratch with a purpose built sail.

Good luck,

121Guy
 
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