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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I came back to the boat yard to find the technician pounding in my new cutless bearing with a sledge hammer on the bare face of the bearing. I got a little perturbed since I had already asked his boss if they had a puller to install it with. He assured me they did, but I guess I should have asked if they would use it.
What, if any, problems should I look for.
Or am I over reacting since he says "this is how they always do it".
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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I would be ripping mad at the yard, and have them cease all work on the boat immediately (and not pay them a dime).

Assuming that you have a strut, the bearing should be press fit into the strut. It actually slips in rather easily, once you heat the strut, and back out any set screws, with a C clamp.

The end of the bearing, where gorilla-boy was hammering, is probably bent. Hopefully, the strut hasn't been damaged too.
 

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Corsair 24
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did they use wood block?assuming in keel, if not(strut) absolutely reject it! its also very possible the strut is damaged....

ive used a wood block but on a full keeler

dont accept dumbass work! demand the work dine right or cancel RIGHT NOW!
 

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One of None
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Oh... My... Gawd.... If they used a hammer on the cutless .. what if they did the same putting the shaft back in? Time for a new transmission! Hell they may even used a hammer to pull it!
 

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last cutlass I did was in keel, some grease tap tap with a block of wood cleaned up and set screw and that was it...seoze the wire call it a day

if someone used a sledge hammer on a strut though

wtf????????????????

idiots
 

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So I came back to the boat yard to find the technician pounding in my new cutless bearing with a sledge hammer on the bare face of the bearing.
"technician" ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I hesitate to name the business as I haven't negotiated the bill (It's in North Vancouver). To be totally honest, I found a greasy piece of 2x4 with 3 or 4 impact marks. I guess when I arrived he'd given up using the board because he certainly wasn't holding it for the last half a dozen swings. The strut appears OK and the bearing is a little mushed but the bronze clears the shaft, so I guess its OK. He made a few scores in the bore of the strut with a sawzall, when he took it out, but they weren't deep.
I've asked for a bill to date for removing the prop shaft and replacing the cutless bearing. They were hired to replace the PSS seal but couldn't get the retaining screws out of the ring. They cut the shaft in 3 to remove it because the shaft won't clear the rudder. That's understandable but anyone working professionally on boats should know how to drill stainless.
Then he spent some time trying to remove the radial drive wheel through pin. He twisted the head off and didn't agree that an impact driver would have had a better chance of breaking it loose.
After seeing that he didn't know enough to use cutting oil and low speed to drill stainless, I bought an angle drill and drilled it out myself. Awkward angle and location meant it took an old fart like me quite a while.
He kept trying to figure out how to put the new shaft in without dropping the rudder out all the way. Looking at it, it was obvious he was wasting time so I suggested lifting the boat to remove it. That was done and the new shaft went in far enough to drop the boat back down. He even had trouble pushing the shaft in because he didn't lubricate the bearing. After he stomped off I put some liquid hand soap on it and pushed the shaft the rest of the way in.
I'll put the new seal in tomorrow and reassemble the steering on Sunday so they won't p!ss me off any more.
 

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I hesitate to name the business as I haven't negotiated the bill (It's in North Vancouver). To be totally honest, I found a greasy piece of 2x4 with 3 or 4 impact marks. I guess when I arrived he'd given up using the board because he certainly wasn't holding it for the last half a dozen swings. The strut appears OK and the bearing is a little mushed but the bronze clears the shaft, so I guess its OK. He made a few scores in the bore of the strut with a sawzall, when he took it out, but they weren't deep.
I've asked for a bill to date for removing the prop shaft and replacing the cutless bearing. They were hired to replace the PSS seal but couldn't get the retaining screws out of the ring. They cut the shaft in 3 to remove it because the shaft won't clear the rudder. That's understandable but anyone working professionally on boats should know how to drill stainless.
Then he spent some time trying to remove the radial drive wheel through pin. He twisted the head off and didn't agree that an impact driver would have had a better chance of breaking it loose.
After seeing that he didn't know enough to use cutting oil and low speed to drill stainless, I bought an angle drill and drilled it out myself. Awkward angle and location meant it took an old fart like me quite a while.
He kept trying to figure out how to put the new shaft in without dropping the rudder out all the way. Looking at it, it was obvious he was wasting time so I suggested lifting the boat to remove it. That was done and the new shaft went in far enough to drop the boat back down. He even had trouble pushing the shaft in because he didn't lubricate the bearing. After he stomped off I put some liquid hand soap on it and pushed the shaft the rest of the way in.
I'll put the new seal in tomorrow and reassemble the steering on Sunday so they won't p!ss me off any more.
Time to find a new yard.. This guy is not qualified to peel an apple.....

Chances are you now also have:


*An improper fit for the coupling to the shaft = Dangerous and vibration causing

*Lack proper fitting and facing of shaft coupling = Dangerous and vibration causing

*Lack a properly fitted prop = Can also be dangerous and cause vibration

*Likely have PSS set screws that have been "snugged" more than once = Dangerous
 

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Seems they are a yard with average skills and customer service. Incompetent and blame you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Maine Sail

Shaft and coupling should be OK. I went directly to the machine shop that does most of the local shafts and had a new shaft made and the coupling fitted and faced.

I'll install the new PSS myself, as per your tutorial.:D

The prop installation to the loose shaft is the only thing I didn't watch. The shaft was sitting in the stern tube without the coupling so they couldn't have damaged the transmission coupling or bearings.

Of course I would have been blissfully ignorant and accepted their explanations if I hadn't read your tutorials, so this stress is all your fault.:p
 

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Bombay Explorer 44
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So I came back to the boat yard to find the technician pounding in my new cutless bearing with a sledge hammer on the bare face of the bearing. I got a little perturbed since I had already asked his boss if they had a puller to install it with. He assured me they did, but I guess I should have asked if they would use it.
What, if any, problems should I look for.
Or am I over reacting since he says "this is how they always do it".
Nope use of a sledge hammer on a P bracket is bad practice.

1 Find a new yard for next year.

2 Take some pictures to document the bad practice.

3 Plan how to minimize any further bad practice.
 

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This kind of stuff boils my blood.

The amount of half a**ed crap I've found boatyards doing is absolutely astonishing. I've just come to the conclusion that you either have to watch over their shoulder or do the work yourself, otherwise you can't depend on most yards to do the work correctly. For example, I just recently found that the electrician we paid $350 to rewire our battery bank left one battery disconnected, with the positive lead resting on the fuel tank.

I've almost given up on boat ownership over the astonishing level of CRAP I've had to deal with from yards and people doing work. With two exceptions, I have to do all the work myself because no one else will do it even halfway right. I don't want to be offshore to find that my batteries are dead because half the bank isn't connected. I used to enjoy it, but it's becoming a burden having to do everything myself, something I really don't have enough time to do these days.

If it'll make you feel better, our nightmare is currently a > $5k rudder re-rebuild. The prior owner had the rudder rebuilt because it was wet, the guy foamed the rudder in with no taper on the edge (it looked like a barn door) and the rudder extended an inch below the keel (this is on a full keel boat w/ attached rudder). That can be dealt with, the worst part? When we pulled it out, we found that the rudder shaft had been CUT and step welded from 1 1/2'' down to 1'' and BENT(!!!) in the process! Oops. Oh, to fix the fact the rudder wouldn't fit into the rudder tube on the boat, he cut the rudder tube and replaced it with a stuffing box that he installed crooked. You can barely comprehend the absolute nightmare this has become, especially since we were supposed to move aboard 3 weeks ago. The tube was also corroded and filled with water, corroding from the inside out.

The moral of the story: Do it yourself. If you don't, it'll end up being done poorly and you may not find out until it's too late. I think boat yards progressively get away with smaller and smaller increments of half-a**ery until they feel like they can get away with anything just to get the job done.
 

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BINGO...this applies worldwide...in many places...you either look over their shoulder or do it yourself...

very very few places attain a level of workmanship that is better than you on your time...

those that are, you will know because they charge good money for those jobs, and even then go by references NOT by price or reputation...

it boils my blood too when people get quoted 2k for a prop and shaft installation and maybe a badly done alignment and on top of that do stuff like sledge hammer a strut.

that and having $90 workers who get paid 10 bucks and hour do expensive work that requires a high skill level and knowledge.

anywhoo

carry on
 

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Blood boiling time?......... I have stories!

I will start by adding the phenomenon that the less the yard tard knows, the longer they take to do it incorrectly and you pay even more.

I once asked the marina manager how he felt if two of his guys were assigned to the same job but took different amounts of time. Didn't phase him, he charges whatever time they take. Asking him for an estimate to do a job is like listening to one of the pharmaceutical advertisement side effect disclaimers. I will say, when they do work for me, I get many of those symptoms.
 

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jajajaja
 

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Not in defense of these maintenance practices, but there are times where a BFH (big fxxxxx Hammer) moving at slow speeds is the softest way to install something.
 

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I used to get paid quite handsomely to oversee the yard work on a fleet of tugs at a commercial shipyard. This kind of thing does not just happen in yachting. Everything from adding nonexistent personnel to charging for work never done; it's all in the realm of possibility at a yard of any sort. At the yard where the PO had work done on my boat, they couldn't align the engine because the shaft brake disc was too big, so they just did nothing; for years! But they charged the PO time and time again for shaft alignment, because the PO kept insisting that the shaft needed alignment. Funny thing, though. The boat had a MaxProp. The shaft brake was a bit redundant anyway, don't you think?
A knowledgeable and reliable yard is a gem, getting harder and harder to find. It is very important to be a knowledgeable owner, these days.
 

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So I came back to the boat yard to find the technician pounding in my new cutless bearing with a sledge hammer on the bare face of the bearing. I got a little perturbed since I had already asked his boss if they had a puller to install it with. He assured me they did, but I guess I should have asked if they would use it.
What, if any, problems should I look for.
Or am I over reacting since he says "this is how they always do it".
There is no excuse for pounding on the strut with a sledge hammer! Aside from the mushroomed and distorted bearing sleeve, think of the stress he was putting on the strut itself! You could easily knock the strut out of alignment with one angled blow, and what if you crack the fiberglass? It's just not meant to withstand loads in that direction! Any good mechanic should be able to figure out how to press the bearing in with nothing more than a length of reddi rod, some washers and a couple of nuts! No good mechanic would resort to a sledge hammer in that situation!

As someone who lives in the same neighborhood as this hack, I would like to know what company employs him so I can avoid them if I am ever in need of such services. I do most of my own work on my boat but you never know when I might need a bit of help with something, and I don't want him anywhere near my boat!
 
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