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I have not heard of UV coated Dacron so before deciding to go that route I would want to know how it stands up relative to Sunbrella which has been the only real option that I have heard of. On that note Colin Mack of Mack Sails told me that the darker colours like dark blue have much better UV resistance than light colours like white of sand beige.
 

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Sunbrella is twice as heavy and shrinks at a different rate than dacron over the long term.

Dacron doesn't last as long and made need replacement earlier, but is cheaper as well.

For the PNW (where light air is normal and UV is low) I can't see much reason to use Sunbrella. For the Carribean it seems like Sunbrella would be an obvious choice.

I'm surprised that your sail maker didn't have a conversation with advice on this for you?

You left out one other option, which is no UV cover and using a sock that is installed at the dock. This is what I'd probably do if starting over. It makes each headsail cheaper and lighter, with the downside of requiring an extra step when putting the boat away. A J/109 that I sail on uses a roller furling sock.
 

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My RF genny cover is Dacron. Its on its last legs, but I'm note sure how old it is. It's on its fifth season with me and the PO had the boat for 4 or so years and it was the sail he got with the boat, so at least 10 years. I like the white cover and the lighter weight compared to Sunbrella. I would go with Dacron again.
 

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Finishing up my sails, the sailmaker asked if I would like the roller furling to have UV coated Dacron or a colored sunbrella, like to make the mainsail cover. It's probably a minor choice I'm making, but are there any major differences aside from aethetics?
On your Bristol, you'd be better served with Sunbrella UV cover. You're not likely racing the yacht in other than club PHRF events, if at all, so the marginal added weight of the Sunbrella is of no material consequence and it is much preferable to UV treated Dacron for a much longer time period, especially so considering your latitude.

FWIW,,,

PS: You have a handsome yacht by the way. Good for you!
 
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It's not a matter of racing vs cruising. It is a matter of how light of air can you fly the sail in. Most cruisers also want their boat to move in light air. The Sunbrella cover only makes a minor weight difference in the overall sail weight, but that weight is concentrated along the leech and clew, where it causes the sail to collapse in lighter winds where no cover or a dacron cover would still allow the sail to fly.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks.. You said I have a handsome yacht, where do you see it at? I should really post pictures in my profile or something...previous thread?

So....I told the sailmaker Dacron. I talked to him today about finishing touches he's putting on like the logo for my boat.

Don't forget I do hope to make California, and sail in high winds sometimes. Should I call him back and switch to black sunbrella to match the mainsail cover or leave it Dacron?
 

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It depends on how long you want to keep the sail. The Dacron will go to tatters in 4-8 years, depending on climate and sailing season (some of these folks are from the north and store the sail inside in the winter--I don't and you don't, so the life will be far less) and it will cost $500-1000 to replace. Sunbrella will outlast the sail.

Unless you're a racer, if there is so little wind that it makes a difference--we're talking 2 knots--you've turned on the engine anyway. The difference is small, IMHO (my current genoa had a light cover--I noticed very little difference with Sunbrella replacement, other than I'm not worried about it anymore).

If you replace a sail when the shape goes just a little, it won't matter. I can't imagine deciding based upon looks.
 

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I have the white stuff on my genoa, and blue sunbrella on the blade. I can thusly tell which jib is on the furler, instantly, without unfurling it.
 

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Don't forget I do hope to make California, and sail in high winds sometimes. Should I call him back and switch to black sunbrella to match the mainsail cover or leave it Dacron?
The Sunbrella doesn't allow you to sail in higher winds. It doesn't add any structure to the sail, it is just UV protection.
 

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Sunbrella is heavy and UV resistant but chafes easily. Best choice is a light weight WeatherMax. Light, better chafe resistance, better sail shape along the leech. Sailmakers prefer it.
 

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Truth be told, Northocean, you can go either way. I personally prefer the glued on Dacron. My oldest genoa is now fourteen years old and has shown no ill effects. Previously, I had Sunbrella jibs where the stitching has rotted out but I’ve been told that they are using better UV stabilized thread now. I looked into the sleeve and it’s break-even cost is two jibs without covers. And, besides, they rattle and make a racket in breezes. Most importantly, where are those winter shots taken? Eastern Oregon or Washington? Makes me a little homesick for the Palouse.
 

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I don't live in CA, which is why I didn't respond to how dacron would hold up there. My temptation would still be to go with dacron, but I'd want to get advice from a sail loft with experience there.

The good jib socks have a tensioning system that keep them from flapping around or chafing the sail. The boat that I race on has an older North sock that seems to do the job well, and the ATN is also well respected. I understand not wanting to have a sock on a pure cruising boat, it is an extra step.
 
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