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Master Mariner
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8,950 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
It's not just yachties that leave their vessels afloat to become a danger to others at sea. On this one, even when the ship sinks, the logs will present a significant danger for many years to come.
"500-Foot Log Carrier Abandoned in the Pacific
The U.S. Coast Guard reports today that twenty-four sailors from the M/V Rich Forest are now safe after being rescued by the bulk carrier CS Sunshine, 440 nautical miles west of Guam.
The sailors were enroute to China with a cargo of logs when the ship’s engine room began to flood with 160 tons of water per hour. Power was lost on board the Rich Forest, and a distress call was made at 8 a.m. local time on Sunday.
At 1:21 p.m., the crew entered life rafts and abandoned ship according to the Coast Guard report."
 

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Remember you're a womble
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2,328 Posts
We always have lots of logs floating around in the water in these parts, you just need to keep an eye out and if you're out at night, you just pretend they aren't there and rely on luck.
 

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24 Posts
Wish I could salvage a lot of the floating logs. There should be some exatic wood there. Be lots of money for sailing. Would make it safer for small boats.
 

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Banned
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3,112 Posts
That is why I wouldn't go to sea in anything which is not made of metal. When I want to park on a log boom in a strong wind, I T- bone it at hull speed; and she parks, no problem. A single log at a time at sea is zero concern to me.
 

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Senior Member
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19,488 Posts
Wish I could salvage a lot of the floating logs. There should be some exotic wood there. Be lots of money for sailing. Would make it safer for small boats.
Best odds that the logs are plain old Douglas Fir or Hemlock and came from BC to begin with!!:(
 
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