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Discussion Starter #1
Following up on my quest for a new dink, I have a curious situation I need to deal with on the davits setup.

The transom on the new Benes is such that the davits need to be installed very far apart. Indeed, the shortest distance between the davit arms that I can finagle is 114". What this means is that the davit arms likely are going to be farther appart than the davit lifting points on every dink that we might get (and if we get one that's large enough so this is not the case, the dink will be too heavy for what we want to do).

Has anyone else had experience dealing with davit arms that are wider than the dink? How did you deal with things like chafe on the tubes? (my plan is to attach the lifting tackle for the bow to the towing ring, which is outboard of the dink so that the run will be fair from the towing ring to the davits). Are you able to get the dink high enough off the water, considering that if the davit arms are not dirctly over the lifting points you necessarily can't lift the dinghy as high?

Any other thoughts or solutions would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Warm Weather Sailor
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I have a pair of Ocean Marine davits on one boat (CS36) and an arch on the other (B393). I carry a 10'06" dink with a 15hp Yamaha on both. All you have to do is put two towing rings in the bottom of the forward part of the dink. That's what I did. Davits work better if the falls cant out a bit. That way when the dink is hauled the falls pull the dink in at both end and helps in stopping the side to side play. The falls are not vertical. In addition the dink is held by four ratchet straps. Two diagonal and two straight in. The straps are attached to the towing eyes and the pushpit rails on the CS and the arch on my 393. Check out the Ocean marine site, lots of good information on davits but if it's not too late I'd go with an arch. The Beneteau arches are actually cheaper than davits.
Ocean Marine Systems - Davits, Rails, Lifts, and Platforms.
Ocean Marine Systems - Davits, Rails, Lifts, and Platforms.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Rick, but . . .

My problem is the opposite, if I understand what you're saying. That is, the "falls" as you call them, are wider than our dink, not more narrow.

Arch is out, mostly because it's too late and also because the Admiral vetoed the aesthetic from day one (and I can't say that I disagreed, though I am a believer in form follows function).
 

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... a logical conclusion
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My problem is the opposite, if I understand what you're saying. That is, the "falls" as you call them, are wider than our dink, not more narrow.
You might consider crossing the falls; running them diagonally.

Arch is out, mostly because it's too late and also because the Admiral vetoed the aesthetic from day one (and I can't say that I disagreed, though I am a believer in form follows function).
My boat came with an extremely useful arch :D It is great for such things as keeping the traveller out of the way while allowing end-of -boom sheeting, mounting solar panels, bracing davits, rigging a bimini, etc.
 

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Why can't the arms angle inward so the blocks are closer to the lifting points. My Kato davits have a hefty stainless steel bar that hold the arms in the desired position. You can see them in this picture. This would make the dink hang a little closer to the transom, but probably not too much.




The bar is custom made for each individual installation. You might contact Kato in Annapolis. This is what they do and I am sure they will have some ideas.
 

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Dan, if I understand your problem correctly, I have seen a solution thou not pretty. A piece of schedule 40 4" PVC pipe was used. Eye bolts were placed from below to match the width of the dinks lifting points to conect the lift harness. then at the ends of the PVC pipe eye bolts were use to match up with the width of the davits. It works well and the boat owner only loss 4' of lift. The next year I saw it, the owner had a sleeve made to match his canvass and it didn't look all that bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Dan, if I understand your problem correctly, I have seen a solution thou not pretty. A piece of schedule 40 4" PVC pipe was used. Eye bolts were placed from below to match the width of the dinks lifting points to conect the lift harness. then at the ends of the PVC pipe eye bolts were use to match up with the width of the davits. It works well and the boat owner only loss 4' of lift. The next year I saw it, the owner had a sleeve made to match his canvass and it didn't look all that bad.
I don't think I can visualize this. Little help? One of the things I was thinking is to build a "T" where the cross "beam" (or top of the T) lays athwartship in the dink and connects the two forward lifting eyes. The other section of the T then runs forward to the top of the tube, and the davit tackle connects to that end. Is that sort of what you are talking about?

By the way, I assume you mean your friend loses only 4" of rise, not 4 feet (I hope).

Thanks to the others, but we're going with Edson davits (dealer installed, already a done deal). Edson davits can't be angled in the way Kato's can. We had Kato davits on our last boat, and it's a nice product, though the Edson's are more robust. Besides, Kato won't make the davits for the new Benes because Kato requires using the stern rail, which is not a great option on the new Benes because the transom is fairly open.

If folks have other ideas, I'm all ears (or I guess eyes would be more accurate). I'm still working through what I'm going to do with this whole setup, so keep the ideas coming.
 

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La Nostra has a very high transom. I have custom made aluminum davits. I use them to carry a 10.5 foot AB inflatable with a solid aluminum hull and a 15 hp Yamaha two-stroke. The width between the davits is just a tad greater than the distance between the forward and aft lifting rings on the dink. This means that if I used the lifting points inside the dink as the sole attachment for the lifting lines the lifting line at the bow would be pressed into the inflatable's tube at the bow. To avoid this (and to make attaching the lifting lines quick and easy) I made up a very simple-to-use lifting harness as follows:
At the stern the dink has two lifting points located inside close to the floor on each side. I have a length of 3/8" line with a loop tied in the center and a large stainless snap shackle at each end. This line is long enough so that when it is attached to both lifting points it's center will be just above the aft gunwale of the dink. I just snap a shackle into each lifting ring and then snap the lifting line from a davit to the center loop. At the bow I simply attach the lifting line's snap shackle into the lifting eye in the floor of the dink. Then, to avoid the chafe about which you are concerned, another line with a snap shackle at each end is clipped into a loop about 18" above the dink's floor at the bow and is then led back and snapped onto the shackle on the end of the lifting line at the dink's stern. Then, when the dink is lifted this bow-to-stern line prevents the forward lifting line from rubbing against the inside of the inflatable's tube at the bow. Once the dink is fully lifted I run two long ratcheting tie-down straps in a crossing pattern, one from the outermost stern lifting ring and one from one of the forward towing rings (located on the outside of one of the tubes at the bow) on the dink. I then place a small fender between the dink and the transom and ratchet the whole thing in tight.
Even in the nastiest weather the dink rides along safely with absolutely no swinging and no chafe. Of course, if I were to make an extended open ocean passage the dink would be deflated and securely lashed on deck, but for even long hops between Caribbean islands this system works just great.
Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Sometimes the simplest ideas . . .

Are the most brilliant! Thanks Harry! Great idea.

I actually plan to have our rigger swage rigging wire between the the two transom lifting points, with a steel ring in the middle. That's what we have done previously, and it works great. When not in use, the wire just lays against the transom on the floor.

But simply running a line from the stern lifting point to the davit tackle at the bow to keep the line off the tubes is brilliant! All at the same time pathetic and hilarious that I didn't think of it on my own.

Thanks again.

La Nostra has a very high transom. I have custom made aluminum davits. I use them to carry a 10.5 foot AB inflatable with a solid aluminum hull and a 15 hp Yamaha two-stroke. The width between the davits is just a tad greater than the distance between the forward and aft lifting rings on the dink. This means that if I used the lifting points inside the dink as the sole attachment for the lifting lines the lifting line at the bow would be pressed into the inflatable's tube at the bow. To avoid this (and to make attaching the lifting lines quick and easy) I made up a very simple-to-use lifting harness as follows:
At the stern the dink has two lifting points located inside close to the floor on each side. I have a length of 3/8" line with a loop tied in the center and a large stainless snap shackle at each end. This line is long enough so that when it is attached to both lifting points it's center will be just above the aft gunwale of the dink. I just snap a shackle into each lifting ring and then snap the lifting line from a davit to the center loop. At the bow I simply attach the lifting line's snap shackle into the lifting eye in the floor of the dink. Then, to avoid the chafe about which you are concerned, another line with a snap shackle at each end is clipped into a loop about 18" above the dink's floor at the bow and is then led back and snapped onto the shackle on the end of the lifting line at the dink's stern. Then, when the dink is lifted this bow-to-stern line prevents the forward lifting line from rubbing against the inside of the inflatable's tube at the bow. Once the dink is fully lifted I run two long ratcheting tie-down straps in a crossing pattern, one from the outermost stern lifting ring and one from one of the forward towing rings (located on the outside of one of the tubes at the bow) on the dink. I then place a small fender between the dink and the transom and ratchet the whole thing in tight.
Even in the nastiest weather the dink rides along safely with absolutely no swinging and no chafe. Of course, if I were to make an extended open ocean passage the dink would be deflated and securely lashed on deck, but for even long hops between Caribbean islands this system works just great.
Hope this helps.
 

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Telstar 28
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Or you could get a 12' 6" portabote, which is long enough that you could lift it using the davits without modification, although you do have to add lifting eyes to the boat, since it doesn't come with any... and it is light enough to work. :)
 

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... Of course, if I were to make an extended open ocean passage the dink would be deflated and securely lashed on deck, but for even long hops between Caribbean islands this system works just great.
Hope this helps.

Wouldn't you want the dink as a liferaft just in case?
 

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Telstar 28
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Most dinghies make horrible liferafts, since they're far to easy to capsize, don't have a canopy, don't have water ballast, etc...
Wouldn't you want the dink as a liferaft just in case?
 

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Biggest problem with a dingy on davits in bad weather is the danger of getting slammed from behind by a following sea. Davits are not made to take that kind of strain. I met a sailor last year that had his davits and stern rail ripped off by a wave. He was making the same passage we were from Jacksonville to Beaufort. The forecast changed and we elected to duck into Cape Fear Inlet. He continued to Beaufort and got nailed.

I have to admit that I carry my dingy on davits offshore, but I only do coastal cruising in good weather. If I was making an extended passage, I would strap in on deck. I don't go offshore in poor weather.
 

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Nearly an Old Salt
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Having owned two beneteaus, I make sure theres a big job done on supporting the davits. Really they need vertical supports running to the swim platform.
 

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Warm Weather Sailor
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Been doing it for four years. 10'06" AB Lite and a 15 hp Yamaha 2 stroke plus a whole lot of crap. As long as it's secured properly it's fine. Of course I only go to the Bahamas but I've been tossed around a bit. So far so good. :) Secret is four good ratchet straps so that there's absolutely no play. No shock loads.
 
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