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Hi all,

I'm new to the San Diego sailing scene...

The other day we found ourselves about 1nm from the border to Mexico before turning around and heading back in..

If we were to keep going...maybe do a loop around the Coronado islands...what is required for US documented boats when travelling in foreign waters? We have no intention of going ashore before heading back to the US.

Do we need anything other than the same documents we need for sailing in the US?.....(I'm sure if fishing is involved a license or permit of some sort is in order).

Thanks,

Tom. C&C 37 Kairos

Sent from my Pixel 5 using Tapatalk
 

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I think you need a passport if within X miles of the Mexican land.

This is a fishing charter service out of SD

Do You Need a Passport?

Not necessarily. All passengers fishing in Mexican waters must possess a valid ID (see above).
Passports may be required for fishing inshore near the Mexican coast or islands, but not for fishing offshore in Mexican waters.
Our 3/4 day trips aboard the Mission Belle and Point Loma may fish inshore or offshore, depending on where the fish are biting.

The MISSION BELLE departs daily for 3/4 day fishing at the Coronado Islands.

Yellowtail, Tuna and Rockfish are the targets here.
Trips depart at 6am and include your Mexican permit and tourist visa.
This is a passport required trip.
 

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We used to do a race around the Coronados and back to SD (it's been 20 years since I did one). I don't recall being told that we needed anything special and I don't think the skipper did anyting in particular either. Might want to check with Customs to see what the rules are now
 

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I think in these Covid times it would be best to contact both the Mexican and American authorities, and find out exactly what the rules are, from the horse's mouth, so to speak.
 
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Territorial waters extend, by international treaty, to 12 miles offshore. As a general rule, vessels are afforded the right of passage, as long as you are not fishing, drilling, or conducting any economic activity and you do not stop, anchor, etc. Nations can also regulate commercial activities out to one to two hundred miles offshore.

Best, as Capta says, to check with the Mexican authorities first. Some nations get picky about the first 12 miles and even the US has the right to board your vessel, without any suspicion, just to inspect. Goes back to the days of revenue collection.
 
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