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Around here we use a lot of round inflatable fenders (scotchman' usually orange). I put one in a black garbage bag on the forestay if anchoring in navigable area. In a recognized anchorage , only light at night. Never bothered with cones.and drive defensively
 

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HANUMAN
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A vessel under 12 meters is not required to display the "motor sail marker". I have yet to see anyone use one that is not required.

Heck, I don't recall seeing the black ball being displayed by pleasure craft in any of the places I frequent.

I'm still waiting to be sailing along, look over and see a vessel displaying the "mine clearing markers". I hope I have change of underwear. :)
 

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Off Victoria water front in Juan de Fuca, under sail, 4 knots. Large Navy vessel coming at my port bow at speed. Tacked at the last moment to let him charge by (100 meters) I make a shrugging motion (WTF) and the man on the bridge points up at the two cones in his rigging Apparently sea trials or something. Gotta keep alert. Be brave and watch for the signs.
 

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Don't call me a "senior"!
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I have one, but only because it came with the boat. I've used it a couple of times when anchored in areas that where I thought there might be some come confusion (such as within a designated anchorage, but near a channel).
 
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A vessel under 12 meters is not required to display the "motor sail marker". I have yet to see anyone use one that is not required.
12 m = 40 feet, lots of boats with LOA more than that.

Personally I get annoyed when boats that are motor sailing don't give way when I'm sailing - lot easier to understand what's going on if people bother.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
OK, that's what I figured. I had in mind to make one out of hoops and cloth. Hoops would pivot, arranged like longitude lines. Flatten one way to store. Flatten the other way to create a cone. Secure hoops open to create a ball.

Thanks for saving my retirement and my marriage.
 

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A vessel under 12 meters is not required to display the "motor sail marker". I have yet to see anyone use one that is not required...
FWIW, this exception exists only for inland waters, not under the international rules.

Both rules are widely and generally ignored by recreational boaters. That said, having been thus reminded of this, I'm checking Defender to get my shapes...
 

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Old as Dirt!
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They havent moved from their bilge locker where I found them after I bought the boat.
Humm... I guess that serves to illustrate that it doesn't take any Balls to anchor in Oz, eh?
 

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FWIW, this exception exists only for inland waters, not under the international rules.

Both rules are widely and generally ignored by recreational boaters. That said, having been thus reminded of this, I'm checking Defender to get my shapes...
That is the technically appropriate thing to do. However, I see absolutely no practical need for either. I've never mistaken a steaming or anchored sailboat for doing anything else.
 

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That is the technically appropriate thing to do. However, I see absolutely no practical need for either. I've never mistaken a steaming or anchored sailboat for doing anything else.
For most boaters the only practical need may be should you be involved in an incident while not showing the required shape. Your insurance company may take this failure into consideration when apportioning fault.

Might be interesting to know the risk of a violation for a USCG licensed captain, the issue here is these are violations immediately visible to any passing official who has time to kill...
 

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The ball is being used more in the Caribbean these days. I don't know why. It seems totally redundant to use it in a known or designated anchorage, but at least it's a lot better than the idiots that use the multicolored LED lights that shine a red then green light as anchor lights around here. Red and green lights as anchor lights? Lets get a grip folks; you might as well just turn your running lights on, if you really enjoy confusing some hapless mariner entering your anchorage on a dark, squally night.
 

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That is the technically appropriate thing to do. However, I see absolutely no practical need for either. I've never mistaken a steaming or anchored sailboat for doing anything else.
I am surprised you never looked at yacht with sails up and wondered if they are motor sailing. :confused:. The distinction has considerable impact :) on the status in terms of the collision regulations

Of course the cone shape is largely ignored by sailors so its absence means little.

It has the unfortunate side effect that in some countries skippers seem to take the view that if sailing yacht is under jib alone it must be motor sailing. Of course this is not true. It does create some doubt when sailing under jib alone if another vessel will will treat you as the "stand on" vessel.

I rarely motor sail but without the visual indication of the cone it does also create some confusion concerning how you behave. Do you pretend you are are sailing vessel on the assumption that other boats do not know your engine is providing propulsion?. Or do you follow the collision regulations correctly and behave as a motor vessel knowing other vessels may treat you as as sailing vessel?

The collision regulations are designed to make it clear which vessel is the stand on vessel. This is to avoid the situation where both vessels are attempting to alter course and inadvertently both make a correction that puts them back on a collision course.

The cone shape is really quite sensible and it is a pity that it is so ignored that it has become irrelevant.

The ball shape can also be useful when looking at large ships, but is usually redundant for our sized vessels. In some countries it is used by a large percentage of yachts, in others it is very rare to see one used.

Its main use is from a legal and insurance point of view rather than any practical value and I display one for that reason.
 

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I actually use both, if present on the charter boat...
And i only use them during the day, anchoring and steaming light should suffice during the night and the black shapes are not seen during night in any case...

The point made before regarding insurance issues is a very valid one!
The lawyers will pick on any little violation of any rule just to put the blame onto the other poor sod... ;)
 
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