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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm re-finishing my teak toe rails and coaming tops. There are a couple of small places that get walked on very frequently, for example the forward end of the coaming, which is used as a convenient step when heading forward or coming back. Also, there are a few places on the toe-rail that get extensive wear from fender lines or from people boarding the boat. I would really like to hear from people who have dealt with this kind of problem successfull, for example by using some kind of treads or rub-guards or whatever. Of course, if you have tried something and it has NOT be successful let me know so I won't re-invent the same mistake.

Regards,
Ross
 

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Been there, done that, got the T shirt.

A long time ago when I was into varnish ... 4 coats oil based, let cure, 4-6 coats of urethane varnish, let cure, 2-3 coats of catalyzed automotive clear coat, then flat sand and powerbuff (finishing!). This did the trick for those who didnt listen that brightwork was not to be stepped on or walked on. Spar varnish is SOFT varnish and easily gouged. If you want to continue with varnish, Id suggest you find someone (usually older than God) who can MAKE you some HARD old-fashioned BARTOP varnish but with added UV filters such as nanoparticle sized Ferrous Oxide. HARD varnish is brittle so youll have to sand it off every 5 years and start over after it cracks/shatters. Obviously HARD varnish cant be applied to flexible applications.

I now use catalyzed 2-part base + 2 part urethane-acrylics (HoneyTeak, etc.) and although the 'walkers' including my dogs with dog nails may occasional scratch the finish, they dont gouge the finish. This stuff is 'hard' yet flexible and since it has an acrylic it can be power-buffed back to brilliance or easily repaired. Normally catalyzed acrylic-urethanes are overcoated every one to two years anyway. I usually overcoat at 3yrs and powerbuff in between; but, I always apply extra-thick.

Honey Teak -- Signature Finish and Honey Teak Products - Home
Its expensive with very high learning curve; but, if the base is put down thicker than recommenced can last 12+ years, and just needs a clear overcoat every few [1-2-3 depending on latitude] years thereafter. When amortized over its normal service life its cheaper than anything else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks to both of you for your suggestions. I will look into Honey Teak for my coating but my original idea was something more like that suggested by Barquito. Those strakes might be good for preventing chaff on the toe rail from various lines, but I wonder if they might be slippery if used as to prevent wear on high foot traffic areas, such as the forward end of the coaming.
Again, thanks for these suggestions.

Any other ideas will be welcome.
 

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My stern dock lines come off a cleat and pass over the teak toe rail. I screwed a strap tang on to the top of the rail on each side where the line passes over it to prevent the dock line from wearing a groove into the teak.

Schaefer Marine Hardware - Detail. They have various lengths and widths.

You could do the same for fenders if they're always mounted in the same spot, and the line must pass over the toe rail ?

I probably wouldn't use stainless where people step, But you could mount a strap and then cut a piece of adhesive non skid to fit and glue it to the top. Replacing the non-skid might be easier than re-finishing that area of the toe-rail.

My outboard genoa tracks are mounted on the toe rail and extend past the boarding gates on each side, so I don't have an issue at the gates.
 

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Instead of stainless then consider one of the clear or pigmented and adhesive backed stairway 'tread protectors'. Most hardware stores have these, just cut to size.
 
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