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Discussion Starter #1
Many of us have been ordered to isolate in place in order to help prevent the spike which could overwhelm the heath care system.

Assuming that, what techniques, tasks are you doing to cope with

1- the disruption of normal routines
2- the psychological effects of your isolation
3- the confining of your physical space
4- the fears of catching the virus
5- the overwhelming media “ negativity”
6- the confusing overload of information
7- the anger of others not complying or politicians not helping
8- changes in availability for your diet
9- separation from family which may be at risk or put you at risk
10- fear of being able to treat if you catch the disease
12 -loss of income or your job and it’s future uncertainty
13- other factors

I listened to an interview with Scott Kelly, a heroic astronaut who holds the record for the longest continuous separation from earth and how he handled the isolation.

Two things struck me in his interview how he coped. One was establishing a routine and secondly starting a journal/ diary of experiences and feelings.

To some on SN cruising is a form of isolation so it will be interesting to see those responses as you experience this already. To other land bound SN sharing feelings and techniques may be eye opening. Hopefully this is not a controversial thread with ANY criticisms of each individual techniques or feelings

Sharing is caring.

Stay safe
 

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We self-isolated 3 weeks ago when the first case of C19 was reported in the state we are currently located in. We had made cascading plans weeks earlier before the virus made it to the US, and implemented those plans as the virus spread hit our cascading action points.

Assuming that, what techniques, tasks are you doing to cope with

1- the disruption of normal routines
Ironically, being "on land" (a marina) in the US is an abnormal routine for us. Being isolated to our boat is more normal. Michele had joined a gym and was jogging in a park, but quit those as part of our plans. She also was going on photography expeditions with enthusiast groups that she stopped. She now has returned to yoga and exercising on the boat like normal. I have been buried in boat projects (the reason we are even here at all), which seems to be my normal life always.
2- the psychological effects of your isolation
Our normal is to often be months in places by ourselves, or with only a couple of other people. In this, we are very comfortable. The difference right now is that there is no snorkeling, beach combing, and other activities we would be doing if we were off cruising. Isolation here and now is just a small adjustment to that of our "normal".
3- the confining of your physical space
Our physical space is the same as always (the boat), but we are more limited to the time we spend off it now. Again, just a small adjustment to our normal.
4- the fears of catching the virus
We assume we will eventually get it. We make plans and strategies/tactics. Fear is a normal part of our lives, given how we live them, and we are used to managing it.
5- the overwhelming media “ negativity”
We don't have a TV. Well, we do, but it isn't connected to anything except our hard drive full of movies and TV shows. Even if it was connected to "real" TV, our experiences in visiting people with TV would lead us to pulling the plug anyway. How people can watch that stuff is beyond us. Instead, we get our news from the internet as always, and can easily filter the sources and content.
6- the confusing overload of information
We are both scientists, and are comfortable with synthesizing and winnowing large sets of data and information. Information overload is a strange concept to us, particularly since this specific issue is right down our previous lives.
7- the anger of others not complying or politicians not helping
I think my postings in other threads speak to this. I just try to take a deep breath now and again (while I still can), and push on with my goal of using my background and experience to help change a mind or two toward making a difference to the outcome.
8- changes in availability for your diet
As part of our cascading plan, we stocked with 3-4 months of groceries long before the US was concerned about the virus. We are eating the same as always, although fresh produce will become non-existant soon, and our fresh frozen after that. However, we are used to spending months in out of the way cruising grounds without fresh produce, so know how to make do.
9- separation from family which may be at risk or put you at risk
Given our lifestyle, we are always separated from our families. We hope by summer that things have normalized more so that we can do our routine long visits with family. Our greater concern is the age and health of our parents in terms of the virus.
10- fear of being able to treat if you catch the disease
Yes. One of the disadvantages of isolating early is that when we do become ill, the health facilities will probably be overrun. We can only hope to be survivors when we get sick.
12 -loss of income or your job and it’s future uncertainty
We are retired, so all income is investment related. We removed 4 years of living expenses from our investments before the market crashed. Otherwise, we have watched 50% of our remaining net worth disappear almost over night, and this is likely to get even worse. We have been through this before with the financial crisis, with the disadvantage of not seeing it coming and making no prior financial moves, but we survived that by keeping our heads down and our expenses low for several years following.
13- other factors
I hesitated posting this given past animosity toward a cruising perspective, and realize that it may be a response that isn't helpful or relatable to many others, but it was pointed out that all perspectives were wanted.

Mark
 

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Good questions. And before I even read Colemj's response I was thinking these challenges are a lot like those a cruising sailor faces. Living in a small space. risk factors. Isolation. Changes in activities and diet. Adapting to factors beyond your control.

Yes, it is very serious. I'm not denying that this will be devastating before it ends. But I can't say that I feel fear and I'll stay isolated, if that's what it takes. But there are a many who can't or won't follow simple directions.

I feel lucky to have gone sailing and kayaking yesterday. I didn't go within 100 feet of another human and didn't touch anything other than my car and the boat. Safer than getting groceries. I had to snicker that the only three I was that close to were wearing masks... because they were sanding bottoms!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
We self-isolated 3 weeks ago when the first case of C19 was reported in the state we are currently located in. We had made cascading plans weeks earlier before the virus made it to the US, and implemented those plans as the virus spread hit our cascading action points.



I hesitated posting this given past animosity toward a cruising perspective, and realize that it may be a response that isn't helpful or relatable to many others, but it was pointed out that all perspectives were wanted.

Mark
I was hoping that it was a discussion we could all benefit from. I think your perspective as a cruiser could help many as you already by nature are generally more isolated than land lubbers. Dealing with isolation is not something most of us who are working or live stationary in a community have to deal with.

Thanks for your perspective😃
 

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I'm also an extreme introvert, which helps in this situation. I think introvert/extrovert will be more telling on how people cope with isolation than cruiser/non-cruiser. For sure, there are many cruisers who are jumping out of their skins if not continually presented with group activities and direct social interactions.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Good questions. And before I even read Colemj's response I was thinking these challenges are a lot like those a cruising sailor faces. Living in a small space. risk factors. Isolation. Changes in activities and diet. Adapting to factors beyond your control.

Yes, it is very serious. I'm not denying that this will be devastating before it ends. But I can't say that I feel fear and I'll stay isolated, if that's what it takes. But there are a many who can't or won't follow simple directions.

I feel lucky to have gone sailing and kayaking yesterday. I didn't go within 100 feet of another human and didn't touch anything other than my car and the boat. Safer than getting groceries. I had to snicker that the only three I was that close to were wearing masks... because they were sanding bottoms!
A number of my older friends who are in the targeted zone said they felt fear of contracting the virus and not surviving . I’m sure many elderly in nursing homes have some of these feelings also.
 

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My normal routine is pretty much an isolated lifestyle since I retired. Even before COVID-19 I would tend to avoid crowds. I had no interest going to overpriced concerts to see aging rock stars. I have also avoided movie theaters for over a decade for a few reasons including the risk one or more people there might have some communicable diseases like Tuberculosis. Movie theaters are so 1930's when one can now watch movies in the comfort of ones own home too. Since driving is one of the most dangerous things people on a daily basis. I limit my driving to only when needed. There is even less of reason these days to pull out of the drive way.

My biggest problem with isolation is getting motivated to do things other than lay around with the Laptop and check what going on Sailnet, You Tube etc... I am finding myself a little more motivated these days. Especially since I still need fabricate a new sailcover before the sailing season starts. Of course cooking does take a bit of my time too.

I can certainly understand how others are having trouble coping. My companion really needs structure and schedules in her life. Other than the productivity issue I still enjoy the unscheduled life. I'm certainly not living in fear of the Virus considering my living conditions.
 

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Avoiding zombies was so cut and dried. This apocalypse is much more complicated. AS things settle down we may all have heat sensitive tattoos on our foreheads.. Will be a bit safer to mingle then? Time will tell.
 

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15 years ago a dear friend to the Wife and I we were “urban hermits.”

FWIW this is pretty normal for us. The only disruption is to our schedule to go to haul and go to our Canadian home for the summer.

I’m figuring we will be in Dominica until about June 15. That gave neither one of us any consternation, at least as far as “isolating.”
 

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Currently for me it very old time school.

I am out of rum and starting to talk like Captain Jack :eek:
 

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1- the disruption of normal routines

Not much. I have been self unemployed architect working from my home office for more than two decades. Work has been drying up and so I am more not working than working. My work did bring me outside to meetings occasionally but not so now. The internet is how I do 99% of my work and I can do this from the boat.

I do the boat in winter and summer. Winter has has not changed. Planning on the same summer experiences... which do not involve messing about ashore much. We are mostly sailing and hang out aboard and bring provisions when we come to the boat.

I just moved my sister from assisted living to an apartment upstairs in the middle of this lock down. Moving is exhausting... moving a sister with dementia is 10x more plus establishing all the routines, setting up an apartment working with the 24/7 aids. Caring for and having her upstairs is a huge upset to my normal routine. Amazon supplies us almost everything tangible.

TV is on most of the time. I read the internets.

2- the psychological effects of your isolation

None. We do like to see our grand children and we just had a new born less than 2 weeks ago. We do duo/facetime with them but it's not the same.

3- the confining of your physical space

No problem... I walk the dog and drive to get groceries... now I order and pick up or they are delivered. In store shopping used to be a bit social so that's gone.

4- the fears of catching the virus

Not sure. I have other muscular-skeletal problems to deal with. I have PT equipment at home and Burke has closed. As we isolate more I assume we will avoid exposure. Who knows?

5- the overwhelming media “ negativity”

Media seems to be trying to be flashing red alarms. They expose the absurdity (failings) of the states rights federal system in the USA. The Trump administration looks more incompetent than ever... not the least bit encouraging.

6- the confusing overload of information

Not confused. Information is there for the taking if you use google.

7- the anger of others not complying or politicians not helping

No anger because I am avoiding contacts as much as possible. But the people who litter, make noise in public, drive without consideration and so on have another opportunity to act like anti social jerks.

8- changes in availability for your diet

So far not much. I expect fresh stuff could get scare. We'll be eating more prepared frozen foods.

9- separation from family which may be at risk or put you at risk

Our family is all on wife's side. I worry for their exposure. Kids are being home schooled. Babies don't understand and probably benefit from their parents being at home 24/7. I need to survive to care for my sister. She has no one else. Her care costs have taken a bump and her "savings" a drop. I think she'll outlive her savings... but her care does add some level of risk...

10- fear of being able to treat if you catch the disease

I suppose this is a matter of when. I am about to be 73 and so high risk in good general health and no history of illness. I need to learn how local infected people are treated and where.

12 -loss of income or your job and it’s future uncertainty

Income has been on decline and this was almost like the final nail "ending" my career. I have the boat and could live aboard. I have to get rid of tons of stuff. YUCK.

13- other factors

C19 may be an inflection point for USA for all sorts of things... and it hopefully will see some major changes for the better... like "health care for all"... livable wages and a society where people are more mindful and respectful of others. You don't know what you had til it's gone and people may change their life goals and life styles. Focus on the self is out of control in America. No... greed is not good.

The greatest invention of humans was society were people cooperate to lift everyone up. Let's honor this meme.


Stay safe
 

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1- the disruption of normal routines
2- the psychological effects of your isolation
3- the confining of your physical space
4- the fears of catching the virus
5- the overwhelming media “ negativity”
6- the confusing overload of information
7- the anger of others not complying or politicians not helping
8- changes in availability for your diet
9- separation from family which may be at risk or put you at risk
10- fear of being able to treat if you catch the disease
12 -loss of income or your job and it’s future uncertainty
13- other factors
We are retired living aboard our sailboat in Dominica. We had intended to stay here a month, it’s gonna be a bit longer.

This is follow on to my short earlier post, more detail.

1 My “daily routines” are minimal once I get past breakfast, no impact.

2 My Wife and I were described as “urban hermits” years ago. We are happy in our own company. We don’t feel isolated.

3 We are normally on a boat. Except for the last few days we have been able to get out and walk on isolated beaches or trails. If I get feeling enclosed I’ll go swimming. Tomorrow the total curfew should be over and the beach open again.

4 I fear catching the virus, that’s why we have not gone back to the states. Much better chance to avoid it here.

5 We haven’t watched TV in well over 10 years and gave up the morning news radio about 7 years ago. The only media we get is the internet. And that’s mostly just stupid **** I ignore. I follow the news, if you can call it that.

6 93.7% of statistics about the virus are meaningless. Turn it off, I google the meaningful stats.

7 I don’t listen to either. Why visit the nut house if it bothers you?

8 I’ve had no changes.

9 no changes

10 Fear of treatment is real. I fully expect no treatment, either here or in the USA. So we put a very high priority in not getting the virus. Because of past experiences hospitals terrify me.

11 missing

I2 We are retired, SS payments, small mention, 401k, rent property income. It hurts but we will survive. We are better kid than most, so we are thankful. Not rich, adequate. Cheap boat, cheap house, cheap car, all paid for. Total value of all our assets outside the rental: 2 cabins, 2 boats, 1 car, some property is just about $200,000 USA. All owned free and clear.

We are both readers, so we spend a lot of time at that. History and non-fiction. Psychology, anthropology, human development stuff. Biography’s. Little to no fiction. And obviously I enjoy conversing in the net. And I fuss with the boat, it’s steel so there is always rust to chase. ��

I’m a happy man. I spent 40 years employed, 7 different companies, no unemployment. 3 careers, all related, but different. I did it not like my work much. Some was OK, had its moments. Far too much was hateful. But it paid the bills regular, and left something over for the things I did enjoy. Now I just want to make this wonderful retirement last as long as possible.
 

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I'm also an extreme introvert, which helps in this situation. I think introvert/extrovert will be more telling on how people cope with isolation than cruiser/non-cruiser. For sure, there are many cruisers who are jumping out of their skins if not continually presented with group activities and direct social interactions.

Mark
Yup, we are both introverts. The Wife more than me. It helps, in this case anyway. The City is Waaay to much stimulation.
 

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My wife had a Stem Cell transplant in late January. The procedure is chemo to knock back her Multiple Myeloma Cancer, then a stem cell transplant destroying her immune system and then slowly regenerating it over a year long process with implanted Stem Cells. The chemo pretty much kept her bedridden since August. Because of her immune difficiency she's been in lockdown since getting out of the hospital in mid February. She's recovering well from the ordeal and is almost back to normal. I'm an old fart with long term diabetes so also in an 'at risk' group. I've gotten out to the boat weekly, done the shopping, and run general errands occasionally but have gone to total lock down because of Covid19 which would surely be fatal for my wife. Our son, daughter in law, and a neighbor do our shopping for us. We do do a daily 1 1/2 mile walk on a mostly deserted train right of way behind our condo. Other than that we're totally practicing social distancing, being hermits.

The condo is boat sized, only 600 square feet, but actually quite comfortable. Of course we lived in a VW bus for a year and cruised in a 32' boat for a couple more when we were younger so not completely new to close quarters and self sufficiency.

I'm getting along fine reading, wasting time on the web, and streaming video. My wife is starting to chafe at the isolation after 2 months stuck in the apartment and the inactivity 6 months before. Our kids and the grand kids call most evenings which breaks up the monotony somewhat for her but she's getting very antsy. Normally recovery form the stem cell procedure would have allowed limited outside adventures at the end of April. Unfortunately, Covid19 has probably postponed that freedom till the threat is over which will undoubtedly run into summer.
 

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The wife and I don't drink, don't belong to a gym, or belong to any clubs... So our lives really haven't changed that much.... I'm retired and the wife works in a hospital, so she is still working...

My 2 day a week volunteer gig is shut down, I do miss that... So far the grocery stores have not run out of anything we need. I still get together with one friend to go sailing once a week or so, that might be frowned upon some places, but SC isn't under a lockdown yet...

The trick is to do something every day. There is always something around the house or the boat that needs cleaning or fixing.... Getting sick, shortages, and people going nuts is still a worry, but a low grade worry. I figure there is NOTHING I can do, so why worry.... Just keeping our fingers crossed that this passes sooner rather than later.....
 

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Discussion Starter #16
My wife had a Stem Cell transplant in late January. The procedure is chemo to knock back her Multiple Myeloma Cancer, then a stem cell transplant destroying her immune system and then slowly regenerating it over a year long process with implanted Stem Cells. The chemo pretty much kept her bedridden since August. Because of her immune difficiency she's been in lockdown since getting out of the hospital in mid February. She's recovering well from the ordeal and is almost back to normal. I'm an old fart with long term diabetes so also in an 'at risk' group. I've gotten out to the boat weekly, done the shopping, and run general errands occasionally but have gone to total lock down because of Covid19 which would surely be fatal for my wife. Our son, daughter in law, and a neighbor do our shopping for us. We do do a daily 1 1/2 mile walk on a mostly deserted train right of way behind our condo. Other than that we're totally practicing social distancing, being hermits.

The condo is boat sized, only 600 square feet, but actually quite comfortable. Of course we lived in a VW bus for a year and cruised in a 32' boat for a couple more when we were younger so not completely new to close quarters and self sufficiency.

I'm getting along fine reading, wasting time on the web, and streaming video. My wife is starting to chafe at the isolation after 2 months stuck in the apartment and the inactivity 6 months before. Our kids and the grand kids call most evenings which breaks up the monotony somewhat for her but she's getting very antsy. Normally recovery form the stem cell procedure would have allowed limited outside adventures at the end of April. Unfortunately, Covid19 has probably postponed that freedom till the threat is over which will undoubtedly run into summer.
Stay safe...having a routine helps
 

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I can't believe how many little (and some big) jobs we've been getting done, that we'd been putting off either because we had a charter or were just too lazy.
This has been really good for Skipping Stone!
 
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