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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What sort of project is it to reinstall/put back on all the deck fittings? I'm unsure of the labor or material cost to doing so, but may be in the situation where it's required as I'm eyeing a boat that needs this done. I'm not even sure where I would start. As I know it, the boat is in dry-dock, now without fittings.
I

Alternatively, is there a website/database that has full-through information for self-repair (materials, suggestions, etc)?

General advice/commentary appreciated!
 

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Freedom isn't free
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You are likely to be hard pressed to get an answer to that.
Size of boat? It'll be much easier on the 22 footer than a 32 footer!

All the deck fittings... are the toe rails off? Did it HAVE toe rails?
are there genoa tracks? Jib tracks? dorades? Cabintop winches? Cockpit winches? Are the stern cleats off? Did it have stern cleats? Hand rails? turning blocks for the mast?

You see the problem?

A start would be the make model and size of the boat.

But honestly it's not difficult work to rebed a clean slate, the difficult part is removing it all, and filling the holes!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks much for the information, the boat's a Pearson 30, ~1973.

What, if I may ask, makes removing/filling more difficult? Is it just trying to remove secured gear without damaging them or the boat?
 

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Re-Bedding Deck Hardware With Bed-It Butyl Tape Photo Gallery by Compass Marine How To at pbase.com

The linked site is a treasure trove of 'how to's'.

The reason removal can be more difficult is if the wrong/permanent bedding was previously used..

The biggest issue with such a job is likely to be access to the underside of the deck to properly install backing plates and fasteners. However if everything's been removed then it's more likely that these places are indeed accessible.

This would be the perfect time to properly prepare the deck/coring for reinstallation. Do some research, esp Maine Sail's site, and this is the perfect DIY project. Cost should be minimal but buy good quality sealant; Quality butyl is available from Compass Marine.
 
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Re bedding deck fittings - look for a post by "mainsail" on this site. He can tell you how and what is needed and supply bedding material.
(Used his method and materials on my boat and 100% satisfied)
 

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Bill SV Rangatira
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Thanks much for the information, the boat's a Pearson 30, ~1973.

What, if I may ask, makes removing/filling more difficult? Is it just trying to remove secured gear without damaging them or the boat?
it would be helpful if you posted pics of the deck area to get more information and a list of hardware being rebedded
 

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Chastened
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Thanks much for the information, the boat's a Pearson 30, ~1973.

What, if I may ask, makes removing/filling more difficult? Is it just trying to remove secured gear without damaging them or the boat?
P30? No problem. Everything is accessible. The worse you'll have to do, is remove the wood panels that the settee cabin lights are mounted to. They remove with a a simple screw driver.

The primary jib tracks are an annoyance, but still accessible. You'll have to start in the galley cupboard on the starboard side and work your way aft, eventually into the cockpit locker. On the port side, you'll work your way aft into the quarterberth. You'll need a ratchet extension.

For the bow pulpit, throw an old blanket into the anchor rode locker, lay on your back, and have at it.

A helper on deck to hold a screwdriver while you loosen/tighten the nuts belowdecks is a necessity.
 

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For deck fittings, from hatches to cleats, stanchions to chain plate covers, I would suggest using the one product specifically designed for bedding things on a boat; bedding compound. It is extremely easy to work with, clean up, readily available and reasonably inexpensive.
 

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For deck fittings, from hatches to cleats, stanchions to chain plate covers, I would suggest using the one product specifically designed for bedding things on a boat; bedding compound. It is extremely easy to work with, clean up, readily available and reasonably inexpensive.
Capta,

A question, and please keep in mind that I don't know enough to even HAVE an opinion on this, so I'm definitely not questioning the validity of yours.. I'm just curious.

MaineSail (and others) have posted and written "how-tos" extolling the virtues and benefits of using butyl tape. Frequently when the topic of bedding fittings comes up on these forums, you consistently recommend bedding compound. Why do you prefer it over butyl tape?

I ask because I'm probably looking at a lot of rebedding prior to next season in an attempt to fix the two remaining small leaks that my portlight renovation, sadly, did not alleviate. Still trying to decide between the two...

Thanks..

Barry
 

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Capta,

A question, and please keep in mind that I don't know enough to even HAVE an opinion on this, so I'm definitely not questioning the validity of yours.. I'm just curious.

MaineSail (and others) have posted and written "how-tos" extolling the virtues and benefits of using butyl tape. Frequently when the topic of bedding fittings comes up on these forums, you consistently recommend bedding compound. Why do you prefer it over butyl tape?

I ask because I'm probably looking at a lot of rebedding prior to next season in an attempt to fix the two remaining small leaks that my portlight renovation, sadly, did not alleviate. Still trying to decide between the two...

Thanks..Barry
Barry,
It's what I've been using since the early 60's, without a failure of any kind. I read about the butyl when I first saw it discussed on here but honestly, I haven't tried it. I have never said that there is anything wrong with the butyl, not once, though it did sound like a lot more work. I can not see any reason not to go with the bedding compound, and until someone gives me one (I'm all ears, on this), I am just trying to help folks by offering a simple, inexpensive product that I am familiar with, and that works very well.
I use a similar product formulated for underwater use as well, as I prefer it to the synthetic caulking and bedding products. Perhaps it's just a case of an old dog and new tricks, I don't know.
 
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"Dry dock" is a term reserved for ships in graving docks, not for small craft that are simply in dry storage on the hard.

You need to find out why everything was removed from the deck, and how long is has been out. Someone might have removed it all to repaint the deck, but more likely it was all removed because of some problem with water damage and a delaminated deck, which may not have been fixed and may in fact have gotten much worse as rain intruded through the open holes now in the deck. This is potentially a problem that could cost you over ten grand at a yard, or many days of your time and a lot of hard nasty work to cure.

IF there's no problem with the deck and IF all you need to do is install everything, expect that some screws, nuts, bolts, may be damaged or missing, and you may need to order in replacements in stainless steel, adding a delay and some extra work time. If everything is there and neatly stowed...having a helper so one of you is topside and the below, really cuts down the time you lose scrambling in and out. Actual work time if it just needs time? Hard to say. I can change all four car wheels, on the ground with just the car's jack, in an hour. Some folks can do it in half that time, others twice that time. If you're handy, and have a good set of sockets, wrenches, screwdrivers...I'd call it a practical and unrushed "weekend" job.
 

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Mike M. s/v Pharon P30
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What hull number? I have # 475 and will be pulling everything off for a much needed paint job in the spring.
Being in Connecticut, I don't expect to have the boat back in the water before July but it needs it.
I tried to pull the main sheet traveller off last year - it's mounted on a piece of oak just forward of the rear lazerette. After removing all the bolts, it still wouldn't budge. I'm thinking it must have been installed with 5200.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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The hardware's all currently off? Ugh. Are all the holes plugged really well?...cuz I'd be worried about water saturating the balsa core.

Is it a big job? Absolutely no offense intended when I say, for you, yes. For someone experience, it's at least a medium job.

As another responder has already mentioned, check Maine Sail's how to site for a good example of how to treat the holes and re-bed and install the hardware. If you're going to do it right, it's no weekend project.

Oh, and this assumes that there isn't already some serious water intrusion in the balsa before or after the hardware was removed.
 

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Thanks for the question. I have a similar one. We have an old Catalina 27 with numerous deck leaks, and dismounting all deck fittings -- cleats, cheek blocks, stantions, toe rail -- sounds like a monumental job. Even then, I would need to learn a foolproof (!) substance and method of calking, that will certainly solve the problem and last for the rest of my life, or the life of the boat. In fact, I may face the same on another -- worse: balsa-cored -- boat. Is this huge job avoidable? Is there something one could spray or otherwise apply externally, without dismounting the fittings, with any hope of stopping the ingress of water? I would also be grateful for suggestions about balsa core. It horrifies me to think of pockets of water between layers of fiberglass, that will never evaporate, but delaminate the deck and hull. Thanks for whatever knowledgeable advice is available out there!
Ernest
 

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Ernest, you don't have to do them all at once, but they need to be done right. And no, there isn't anything that can be sprayed externally to fix.

As I read your posting, I get the impression you may not be aware that your deck is balsa cored. Catalinas have cored decks, period.

Not even Flex Seal as seen on TV lol.

Do check out Maine Sail's (contributor on this site) ...here's the link:
Marine How To - Compass Marine - Boat Repair Free Information

Yes, there a quicker ways to "fix" the problem. But, it's not that hard to do it right, and it's not an expensive repair. If you're serious about keeping water out of your cabin, and ESPECIALLY your balsa core, don't skimp.

If you already have water in your core, that's another matter entirely.
 
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