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I had some repair areas on my deck, which I sealed using epoxy. I then applied 2 coats of primer (pre-kote) and then 2 layers of paint (brightside), allowing each layer to dry before the subsequent layer. However, now after about 3 years, the paint is starting to peel on all of my 6 repair areas. Are there any suggestions for what I to do the next time I repaint?

On a separate question, my boat has a blue hull, though the original was white. I'm not sure if this is gelcoat or paint, but would I use compound for scratches and wax for shine and protection, or do I first need to identify what this layer is.
 

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My deck paint's doing the same thing on a few, but not all the places I did repairs. Epoxy can be difficult to prep for paint. Develops a waxy blush that must be completely removed before sanding. Sanding over it just drives it into the surface and then you'll never get it out.
On the blue coating, if its paint you should use an automotive compound made for paint. FG compound is too aggressive and might burn through. Find an inconspicuous spot and try to scrape some off. Gelcoat should be pretty thick and difficult to remove. Paint would be a lot thinner and come off easier depending on the type. LPU paints like Awlgrip don't polish out well.
 

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Thank you both. The blue does come off fairly easily (such as from the rubbing of fenders) so I conclude that it's paint.
 

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We find Brightside does not last well and needs repeated re-coating to continue looking respectable. 2-part polyurethanes last a LOT longer (ten years in our case) and since prep for either kind of paint is quite similar, it makes sense to use the 2-part instead. It is more finicky to apply than the one-parts like Brightside, (temperature, humidity, dust and wind are all important) but the results are worth it.

If the hull is painted, rubbing compound will go a long way to removing it. This may not be what you want to do, since a boat with blue swirls over an underlying whitish color is not generally viewed as being "Bristol". After we had our hull Awlgripped, we were advised NOT to use any sort of abrasive (compounds, Finesse, Bon Ami...) whatsoever. Gelcoat is something like 50 times thicker than most topside paints, so can be compounded and then polished with less concern.
 
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