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Discussion Starter #1
I have purchased an Aqua Jet Washdown System (5.2) from Johnson Pump. The pump has received good reviews, but the directions (in multiple languages) are terrible. I looked for a "how to" video but wasn't able to find anything pertinent.

I have an unused thru-hull. The plumbing part seems fairly straight forward, but I could use some step-by-step instruction regarding the electrical part. I'm talking really step-by-step. A website with pictures would be ideal.

Thanks for any help.

mrmac
Dahlgren, VA
 

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Did you try to google it? I searched for "how to install deck washdown pump" and got several hits including a YouTube instruction video from JD.
 

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Once you select the physical location of the pump, measure the distance from your panel switch (independent circuit breaker for 'just' the pump preferred); Plus, the distance to your main 12vdc supply. Then multiply by 2 to include the ground wire in the 'total' circuit length. This will give you the total 'run' of wiring; then ........

Once you have that 'total' length dimension, go to Circuit Wizard - Blue Sea Systems and let the 'program' select the proper wire gage.

FWIW - if you plan on 'extensive' use of the wash down pump, be advised that the typical Johnson Pumps are 'thermally protected' (once the pump reaches a certain operating temperature, the pump cuts-out, automatically). So, to keep the pump motor running 'cooler', its best to oversize the wiring by approx. 10%-15% so that the overall resistance in the wire is less and will result in less 'amps' draw for the pump. Less overall amperage used (motor, PLUS wiring losses) will allow for longer run times with the pump before the internal thermal cut-off switch activates. Typically 15-20 minutes is all you get with a Johnson Pump before the thermal cut-out switch activates. 'Oversizing' the wire a bit, will allow less amps consumed which results in less heating of the pump motor - for longer pump life, and less 'thermal cut-outs'.

http://circuitwizard.bluesea.com/#


Other.
If you do plan on extensive usage of this pump, consider to add a large 'accumulator' to the 'downstream' high pressure plumbing from the pump. This will allow the pump to deliver more 'constant' water flow and with less pump 'cycling'.
 

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Looks fairly straight forward to me. Just wire it to one of your fused panel switches and you're ready to go. My washdown pump is actually situated in the head and I have a 10-foot hose running to a hose connector on the foredeck next to the anchor windlass. I love it!

The one thing I did notice was that there didn't appear to be pressure switch on that pump, and if this is the case, be sure that the nozzle of the hose is open before turning it on - just to be on the safe side.

Gary :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The directions state that for the length of wire I will need (distance from pump to power source x 2) 6 awg wire. The calculator you provided agrees.

The wire coming out of the pump is only 16 awg.

Yesterday I took the pump to a local marina and purchased the hose/tubing and a few small items. I explained my confusion. The owner, a seemingly knowledgeable guy, said that if his marina did the installation, he would use the same gauge wire as used in the pump, in this case 16 awg, or maybe 14 awg. 6 gauge wire just seems really heavy for a small pump.

So ... do I think of the wire as being like a drop cord. With, say 14 awg wire, it's not that I worry about the wire dangerously heating up, but that there will be a severe drop in voltage?

He also suggested that rather than taking the ground all the way back to the panel, I just tie it in at the nearest convenient ground. That seemed kind of jack-legged.
 

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That your pump connection wires are at less AWG than 6AWG doesn't matter, as the total voltage drop (amperage requirement) is dependent on the 'whole' run of wire including that 'short' length of 16 AWG. At least the 6AWG section will be running at the proper 'resistance'. You can recalculate based on the approx length (inches) of those 16ga. wires to see the effect vs. the 'whole' system.

Jack-legging the ground .... if and only if, the ground you tap into is at 6AWG or larger, and the ground that you jack-leg into will never be simultaneously active/energized from another source, for the same reasons above.
Its bad practice to 'jack-leg' into other ground wires - a potential fire hazard; unless you desire a 'fusible link' that auto-destroys itself when the amperage loads get too high .... and you can then 'smell' the burned-out link. - IMO.

Where's Mainsail when you need him?
 

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...I have an unused thru-hull...
Hmmm. I know everyone isn't haulin' around 1000 gallons of fresh water (I'm certainly not), but wouldn't you prefer a freshwater connection? That's how mine is rigged (i.e., rinsing down the anchor rode upon it's return to the locker, etc.).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Rocketscience - we carry about 75 gallons of fresh water, not enough to use for washing down w/o being nervous about running out.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I was going to run the wire back to the panel but now planning to tie into the windlass system. If I were to do that, I could use an 8 gauge wire, a lot less of it, and a lot less snaking around. I was pretty surprised at how expensive that wire is (I know, it's a boat, but as a sailor I like to keep up the tight-fisted image.)

Just came back from the boat after pulling away a few panels in the bow. It appears to me that the path for both the plumbing and the electrical wire follow the same path initially.


I hadn't realized how heavy duty the windlass wiring was. No reason not to go right to the terminals on the windlass, is there?

That 8 gauge wire is pretty heavy. Is there an issue connecting it to the 16 gauge from the pump to the 8 gauge wire?
 

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Hmmm. I know everyone isn't haulin' around 1000 gallons of fresh water (I'm certainly not), but wouldn't you prefer a freshwater connection? That's how mine is rigged (i.e., rinsing down the anchor rode upon it's return to the locker, etc.).
I've been on some boats with freshwater washdown but I greatly prefer saltwater so I don't have to count gallons. I do have a freshwater stern shower I can hook a hose to, but I only use that to clean people and dive gear.

As long as the anchor locker drain is big enough and kept clear there is no issue with a salt water wash down and lots of benefits.
 

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I was going to run the wire back to the panel but now planning to tie into the windlass system. If I were to do that, I could use an 8 gauge wire, a lot less of it, and a lot less snaking around. I was pretty surprised at how expensive that wire is (I know, it's a boat, but as a sailor I like to keep up the tight-fisted image.)

Just came back from the boat after pulling away a few panels in the bow. It appears to me that the path for both the plumbing and the electrical wire follow the same path initially.


I hadn't realized how heavy duty the windlass wiring was. No reason not to go right to the terminals on the windlass, is there?

That 8 gauge wire is pretty heavy. Is there an issue connecting it to the 16 gauge from the pump to the 8 gauge wire?
The problem with tying-in the wash down pump to the windlass system .... you'll probably be using both the pump and the windlass at the same time .... for when pulling in the anchor and simultaneously washing down the chain/rode. A windlass can have 'tremendous' amperage draw when 'breaking out' a fully embedded anchor.
For a combined ground circuit you'll have to add the (maximum) amperages of both windlass and pump to calculate the voltage drop in that single ground wire; the ground wire is JUST as important as the feed wire.
Use the blueSea wiring calculator and simply just calculate the differences in the single combined ground wire, and then individually. You might be somewhat surprised.
;-)
 

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Rich, you should not use the windlass to break out the anchor - and this is spelled out in the user manual, at least that's the case in my Lewmar. The windlass was not designed to break out the anchor, just lift the chain and anchor after the anchor is dislodged.

Gary :cool:
 

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Have a valve which allows use of fresh or salt. Rinse with salt but then re rinse in the locker with fresh. No smell. Also no salt
left on chain or anchor.
 

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Rich, you should not use the windlass to break out the anchor - and this is spelled out in the user manual, at least that's the case in my Lewmar. The windlass was not designed to break out the anchor, just lift the chain and anchor after the anchor is dislodged.

Gary :cool:
Been doing so for the last 15 years with my vertical Lewmar - 'just pressing' my luck', I suppose. But this is from 'muck' (I like to anchor in 8-10ft. of water) and not 'hard stuff'. Besides, the 'other way' is to start the engine ... and I do have a sailboat! :-o

FWIW - 'Big' white perch are 'running' in earnest in the rivers on the upper eastern shore! .... on Small white 'twister tails' and 'bass assassins' ... cast, let sit on the bottom for a few minutes, then slowly 'raise' and 'jiggle' - Wham!

best regards!
 

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Rich, some 10 to 12 inch white perch were caught last week near Rocky Point in the North East River using tiny jigging spoons. I shoulda taken some photos, but was too busy catching fish.

There's an easy method using that windlass to break the anchor loose from the bay's toughest bottoms. However, this only applies to chain rodes. Just take in the slack, stop the windlass, and the weight of the chain will begin pulling the boat toward the anchor. Repeat this a few times and the boat gets moving along pretty good. As the bow passes over the anchor, the tension breaks the anchor loose, and you can then lift it with the windlass without any strain on the batteries or windlass. Works for me every time, regardless of how deep that anchor is embedded in the muck. My washdown pump is a 3-gph with a built-in pressure switch and wired to the house batteries with 14 gauge wire, a distance of about 20 feet from the pump to the fuse panel. It does a fantastic job of blasting that black, gooey, smelly muck off the chain and anchor.

All the best,

Gary :cool:
 

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I was going to run the wire back to the panel but now planning to tie into the windlass system. If I were to do that, I could use an 8 gauge wire, a lot less of it,

That 8 gauge wire is pretty heavy. Is there an issue connecting it to the 16 gauge from the pump to the 8 gauge wire?
I have the same washdown pump and I connected the power into the windlass. No there is no problem connecting different size wires as long as you do it properly

I used 10 AWG - it isn't like is it a critical load and I think for me 10 gauge was a 3% drop.
 

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Hi
I will be undertaking the same process soon, installing the same wash down pump. I was planning to take a second hose from the outlet to the galley as a
saltwater rinse to be used where appropriate, reducing freshwater use when doing the daily tasks around the galley. I would prefer to situate the pump closer to the batteries, this would result in a run of hose of approx 10mtrs to the anchor well. Not sure how much this would the pressure at the outlet?
 

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Mermaid Hunter
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The owner, a seemingly knowledgeable guy, said that if his marina did the installation, he would use the same gauge wire as used in the pump, in this case 16 awg, or maybe 14 awg.
Not very knowledgeable. The voltage drop will make a difference.

You'll either need a terminal strip for the size conversion or a yellow to blue step-down butt and a blue to pink step-down butt. I haven't found any adhesive-lined shrink crimps so you'll need adhesive-lined heat shrink tubing as well.
 
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