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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm interested in a boat that is described as having wet and delaminated decks. The yard that has the boat reported to me that "There is no apparent water intrusion as you can see no water stains on the ceiling boards or other interior wood.The deck seems to be quite wet as we have taken core samples to determinethe extent of this. This core correction is estimated at $18-20,000".
My questions are:
1) What is the best method to repair this?
2) After repair, will the deck be safe?
3) what would be a reasonable price for this repair (31 foot sailboat)?
4) what is involved with repairing this?
5) Is this level of repair best left alone, search for another boat?

Any and all information on this issue will be appreciated. Jack
 

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Real hard to say. First thing I'd check into is the reputation of the yard. If they pass muster, get the owner to pay for the repair and when done to your satisfaction, you'll buy. Asuming the price is otherwise a good deal.

If done correctly the deck should be fine. They will probably peel off the deck, remove all the core, replace the core and then put the deck back on. there is variation on whether to put the deck back on or just glass over a new skin.

But is the boat worth sinking $20,000 into?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the quick reply. The yard seems responsible and has lots of good references. The yard service manager has stated that the boat can be sailed for several years without the repair being done but that each winter the freeze / thaw cycle will cause more damage. The real question is: is it worth sinking $20K into the project. The boat had been listed for $20K more and the price dropped to reflect the cost of the project, so I'm not sure.
 

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1. Open the deck from a top (remove top lay of fiberglass), remove rotted core, replace core, reglass it. Do it in segments.
2. Depending on a quality of job. It can be done to original specifications without any problems.
3. Materials cost around $3000 for entire deck, I guess.. It is simple, but labor consuming project, I’d do it in couple months singlehandedly.
4.I answered that one already
5. Yes, it is better left alone, there are, most likely, other problems as well. Besides, there are hundreds 30 ft boats sitting and waiting for a new owners.
There is tons of information on this forum and on internet on repairing coring problems
 

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I'm interested in a boat that is described as having wet and delaminated decks. The yard that has the boat reported to me that "There is no apparent water intrusion as you can see no water stains on the ceiling boards or other interior wood.The deck seems to be quite wet as we have taken core samples to determinethe extent of this. This core correction is estimated at $18-20,000".
My questions are:
1) What is the best method to repair this?
2) After repair, will the deck be safe?
3) what would be a reasonable price for this repair (31 foot sailboat)?
4) what is involved with repairing this?
5) Is this level of repair best left alone, search for another boat?

Any and all information on this issue will be appreciated. Jack
This can be repaired, but it is a very major task to do so. If properly repaired, the deck will be as strong as it was when originally built, if not stronger. The price really depends on how large the delaminated areas are-as I seriously doubt that the entire deck is delaminated.

The way this type of damage is generally repaired is cutting off the top laminate, removing the core material, replacing the core material, and then replacing the top laminate layer.

If the delaminated areas are extensive, I'd say you'd be better off getting a different boat. There are a lot of boats out there, and getting one that has been well maintained is often less expensive than buying the same boat with extensive damage and getting it repaired.
 

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Thanks Courtney.
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In this market I'd go shopping for another boat. There are to many boats out there without this kind of problem offered at good prices.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you all for your advice. This was my first post on sailnet and I'm very impressed with the quick responses. I'm not sure what I'm going to do but I've just started looking for a new boat and there seem to be some very good deals out there. I've been out of sailing for a few years with the kids in college but now they're out and it looks like a good time to be in the market for a boat.
 

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BTW, I"d highly recommend you read the Boat Inspection Trip Tips thread I started, as it will help you decide which boats are worth going forward on and which should be passed up.
 

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I don't want to be a downer but like it was said before, I would move on; having lived through this with a boat I really loved. Counting the yard time, the work that I couldn't do myself due to my job and my experience, I could have paid a year tution at Harvard. And then, when I gained my senses, I realized to get the boat up to cruising condition would take another year's tution, I sold the boat at a considerable loss.

I chock it up to life lessons learned.

What ever you do, good luck and enjoy yourself
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I think that you all answered my question. I was looking for reasons to go ahead with the purchase when my common sense told me to stay away. The boat looked pretty, was well equiped and something that I would be proud to own, and at a price that was reasonable. But there was one big problem. Oh well, I've just started my search so I'm sure that something will come up. Once again thanks for the advice. I'm sure that I will be back with more questions (and I will read the thread on boat inspection tips).
 

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I think it really depends on the price of the boat. I got my boat dirt cheap for half the cost the surveyor listed as fair value. Mine is a small piece under one stanchion that is wet. I have sealed it over and plan on cutting it open and recoring that portion perhaps next year. If you are any good at wood work and fiberglass its not that bad of a project. Further if you are going to get a yard to do any work for you, you might as well write them a blank check because they will clean you out. If you don't know how to do a repair you can always learn bc nothing on a boat is rocket science.
 

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Sorry forgot to mention, if it is wet around the mast portion I guess I would pass. If its a stanchion area its worth considering esp if the price is right as mentioned b4. Hope this helps.
 
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