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S/V Dreamer - Marieholm26
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello!
I got some problem on the deck.. A small circular patch of delamination. after 30 years of jumping monkeys on the deck...here the photos of 1st part of work... 2nd part I will laminate inside with epoxy ...was a tricky operation but I hope the result will be more strong than original without ruin the walkaway ...here the first photos:
The core is like dinacell no balsa or wood

I cut with the fiberglass with Fein multimaster from inside, due the fact I didn't want ruin the original non skid gelcoat:


After that many deep injection of epoxy and mineral fiber all around I cut a 42 cm marine plywood and put in place with a putty of epoxy + mineral fiber to fill any void cavity...:


At the end I put on the deck 40 kg of lead to squeeze the layers and get the best result in solidity..:

All the complete story of this work you will find it at:
Delaminazione Passavanti di Dritta..!!Delamination Walkway Starboard Side..! - Marieholm26 "Dreamer"Marieholm26 "Dreamer"

Any comment is welcome!!

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The job seems "piu di molto bene". I would have recommended to do it from the top side although it will destroy the image of that area. Applying glass and epoxy from below generally causes loose connections between the two layers which means delamination. In my opinion after applying epoxy and glass from below, you should use an even amount of force to keep the layers connected till the epoxy hardens. You can best achive this by simply attaching nylon to the area and applying vacuum inside.

If you do it from the top gravity takes care of this, doing it from below needs some forces.
 

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doing it from the topside, would be easier but as you have antiskid, blending it in would be a bear. I did this on my old boat but I put down kiwi grip on top. As the repair it is not going to be that visible from the inside top of the deckhead. if you bevel the join area slightly, fill and sand carefully you should be able to have an almost invisible repair. if you cant get it to satisfaction, you could glue up a head liner if needs be. Looks good btw...
 

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S/V Dreamer - Marieholm26
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The job seems "piu di molto bene". I would have recommended to do it from the top side although it will destroy the image of that area. Applying glass and epoxy from below generally causes loose connections between the two layers which means delamination. In my opinion after applying epoxy and glass from below, you should use an even amount of force to keep the layers connected till the epoxy hardens. You can best achive this by simply attaching nylon to the area and applying vacuum inside.

If you do it from the top gravity takes care of this, doing it from below needs some forces.
Hello, thanks for your opinion...
Was quite impossible to vacuum .. So for laminating I use this technique:
First layers of 3 Matt and tissue take off any kind of air bubbles with this:


waiting 1 hour for hardener and resin other layers... I did this for 4 time always looking for best connection in the layers and no air bubbles Hope so will be strong enough...

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Freedom isn't free
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Was there no gelcoat spider cracking then in the area above... I guess my question is, what caused the delamination? Was it merely a failure of the layup, perhaps from stress/use.. or was it water intrusion...

I suppose you understand my meaning... if it was water intrusion that caused the delam.. then you must find the source of the water intrusion, or you'll be doing this again... if it was merely wear/stress, then it might be fixed for good.

Faced with this same issue in my cockpit seat, except I had spider cracking from impacts on the seat... Lemme see if I can find a "before picture...

You can see the spider cracks in the seat by the claw of my hammer in this picture.


Its the reason I attempted my repair from above, despite it making my cockpit seat look ugly. I am not done my repairs yet.
Present state of my repair...
 

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S/V Dreamer - Marieholm26
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Was there no gelcoat spider cracking then in the area above... I guess my question is, what caused the delamination? Was it merely a failure of the layup, perhaps from stress/use.. or was it water intrusion...

I suppose you understand my meaning... if it was water intrusion that caused the delam.. then you must find the source of the water intrusion, or you'll be doing this again... if it was merely wear/stress, then it might be fixed for good.

Faced with this same issue in my cockpit seat, except I had spider cracking from impacts on the seat... Lemme see if I can find a "before picture...

You can see the spider cracks in the seat by the claw of my hammer in this picture.


Its the reason I attempted my repair from above, despite it making my cockpit seat look ugly. I am not done my repairs yet.
Present state of my repair...
Thanks for reply! The delamination was probably caused water intrusion.. I found the way.. Stanchion base!! I I fix everything and I use the Maine way to fix : butyl tape!! No more water. The patch was about 10 cm diameter I make a 45 cm "sanitation"
So hope no more problem in future!!!

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Thanks for reply! The delamination was probably caused water intrusion.. I found the way.. Stanchion base!! I I fix everything and I use the Maine way to fix : butyl tape!! No more water. The patch was about 10 cm diameter I make a 45 cm "sanitation"
So hope no more problem in future!!!

Inviato dal mio iPhone utilizzando Tapatalk
I recommend you counter sink your through bolt holes slightly, and make a o ring out of butyl for your through bolt points. when you reseat the fitting the pressure will seat the butyl o ring and it will never leak again, this is marvelous stuff. 400 degree working range. good choice....
 

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Hi Regatta,

nice work. Been there, done that.

You know you have to but some layers of grp / epoxy + glass / whatever under the ply, stretching well into the old areas of grp?

This you must build up (or down, if one want to use that perspective), in order to get the pieces to be fully connected (bonded). from stress point of view there should not be any abrupt changes.

/J
 

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baDumbumbum
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Even without vacuum upside down just requires taking the time

And boats like the Cal 29 with the outward flange and molded toerail dont have the space above deck to taper the joint for full strength
Exactly. There is this persistent myth that you can't laminate overhead, ooooh it'll all peel apart and leave voids, gravity is a law, etc. etc. Bullsnot. A properly wetted-out, squeegied, and rolled lamination overhead is every bit as good as one done from above. It's much harder work, but the final product is just as good. Once the cloth is saturated and contact with a well-prepped substrate is made, gravity has very little to say. Surface tension more than trumps it. I've done 18oz biax overhead. Believe me, there are no voids or bubbles or delaminated areas. 40 psi from a ribbed roller sorta guarantees that.

Oh yeah, there's lots of plastered cathedral ceilings dating back to the early Renaissance still hanging in there, and that's just portland cement and sand applied overhead. :rolleyes: Whither gravity?
 

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S/V Dreamer - Marieholm26
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52 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hi Regatta,

nice work. Been there, done that.

You know you have to but some layers of grp / epoxy + glass / whatever under the ply, stretching well into the old areas of grp?

This you must build up (or down, if one want to use that perspective), in order to get the pieces to be fully connected (bonded). from stress point of view there should not be any abrupt changes.

/J
Yes! I did it. I sand with 60 all the area and I started with a large piece of Matt completely soak with epoxy. I did this to make a large base for best bonding. After that I start to laminated >small > big.
Used a roller to take off any kind of air on the layers.
I used s winter type epoxy inside my boat, I got 25 degree Celsius so the resin hardened in about 1 hour meantime with roller I take care no air trapped in the middle and make some pressure on the layers. Just hardened start again with new layers.. Total layers 15 matt>tissue>Matt and do on... Finished with matt and peel ply.
Cross finger and touch wood.. But seems very strong!!!!

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