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About 3 weeks ago I got a message from a friend passing along a request for crew to help deliver a sailboat to Florida. I’m too busy with fall chores and my own boat so declined. Found out yesterday that the boat was named Mango Tango and they tried to cut the corner heading into Barnegat Inlet with predictable results. All crew safely rescued but the sailboat in pieces. Have to admit my first instinct was “what were they thinking?!” But I assume fatigued from sailing overnight down from NY and just got a little careless, something we’ve all done more than once and got away with. The location is available both on Marine Traffic, and Navionics app has also plotted where a sailboat sank on 10/23/21. Possibly those who live nearby or are sailing in the area know more details?
 

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Haven't seen a story on that one. Sorry to hear that. A considerable amount of that North Jetty is submerged at high tide. So if you just have eyes on the Visible Rocks, you'll miss the outer Marker. I suggest to everyone who asks, who have never been there, to make sure they approach the inlet from the Sea Buoy! and line up the channel as you approach.

I recall several years ago, a member here, completely restored a boat over a number of years, and on his maiden voyage lost it to that Jetty. Tragic.
 

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"Have to admit my first instinct was “what were they thinking?!”
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hearing this is both sad and painful, as it has affected a fellow sailor, and fortunately was only a "material"loss.
I do not have statistics but believe there had been more losses from mariners seeking the safety of shore when feeling at risk/tired than heading out.
This applies as a reminder to all seeking safety going into inlets from Norfolk south all the way to Florida.
My gut feeling, unsupported opinion.
I do remember going by at night heading north from Cape May and the temptation was there and discarded.
 

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So this appears to be a situation where the approach was too close to shore coming from the north and they clipped a submerged jetty. I think best practice is to approach aligned with the center of the fairway... midway between the jetties...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm thinking that if you were aboard, they wouldn't have cut the corner. Glad you weren't aboard though.
Thank you for that and I’d like to think the same, but I’m pretty cautious about assuming it because fatigue and being anxious to get into a harbor for some rest can do funny things to all our brains and none of us are immune. But hopefully we’ll all file this somewhere back in the sailing/cruising part of our brains so will be a little more wary of these type harbor entrances no matter how we’re feeling at the time. Publicizing incidents like this hopefully avoid the necessity for some others to learn this lesson the hard way. But from what I’ve learned in the last day, it seems like quite a few others have met similar fates in this same location, so it’s worthwhile making others aware of it.
 

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they tried to cut the corner heading into Barnegat Inlet with predictable results.
Only people who know where you're talking about would realise the danger.

Certainly no help to people who follow in their boat.

Why is corner cutting here dangerous?

The chart looks pain, open and easy.

I'm sailing up the US east coast soon and I wouldn't mind knowing :)
 

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Only people who know where you're talking about would realise the danger.

Certainly no help to people who follow in their boat.

Why is corner cutting here dangerous?

The chart looks pain, open and easy.

I'm sailing up the US east coast soon and I wouldn't mind knowing :)
I think people are assuming the north jetty ends and there's deep water. But in fact it continues below the water. Probably a "red right returning" buoy on the north side would prevent people from cutting corners. Not sure... err on the side of caution.
 

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There IS a red light at the end of the North Jetty. But at High Tide it’s in the Water. So if you’re hugging the coast and only looking at the exposed part of the Jetty and don’t look to port you might miss it.

I’ll say it again. Begin your approach from the sea buoy 1 mile off and line yourself up from there. Both channel marks will be seen, and you can determine how you’re being set.
 

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There IS a red light at the end of the North Jetty. But at High Tide it’s in the Water. So if you’re hugging the coast and only looking at the exposed part of the Jetty and don’t look to port you might miss it.

I’ll say it again. Begin your approach from the sea buoy 1 mile off and line yourself up from there. Both channel marks will be seen, and you can determine how you’re being set.
One would think they would look to port to see any approaching traffic and SEE the red flashing... and not cut it,
 

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Hoping that this helps the discussion, here is a recent raster chart of that inlet;
World Ecoregion White Map Font


The area to the north of the channel looks as though it could be approachable... The meaning of that dashed line is vague.

However, in my mind, the only practical inlet for my sailboat between Sandy Hook and Cape May is Atlantic City.
 

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Same chart in vector/ENC format;
Water resources Ecoregion Map World Azure


This seems clearer to me.
 

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Hoping that this helps the discussion, here is a recent raster chart of that inlet;
View attachment 140965

The area to the north of the channel looks as though it could be approachable... The meaning of that dashed line is vague.

However, in my mind, the only practical inlet for my sailboat between Sandy Hook and Cape May is Atlantic City.
Arrrh! Thanks.
The Jetty everyone is talking about is the Line on the north side ending in that dashed line? The dashed line being the old jetty now awash?

Now I see it. Yes that's tricky.
Looking on Google maps it looks like a rock breakwater. Everything looks low and would be a little difficult to see.

Thank you 😊

Mark
 

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Yes, the Dashed line means...it gets covered at high tide. That's not all that unusual.

And the amount that is covered is visually longer in person than it appears on the chart.

Approach from the Sea Buoy! Not the beach. Stay to Starboard of Mid-channel once inside the Jetties ( favor the north side going in and out) and make a hard left going in as soon as you pass the light house to an anchorage area behind the CG station. There are shoals dead ahead not too far past the lighthouse, don't keep going in much past the lighthouse.

If you look at a Chart, Look offshore and you'll see a MoA Buoy " BI" Start there and you'll see Red nun "2" then "4" Then Red six which marks the end of the Jetty.

There are green marks to port. Line yourself up at the MoA Buoy, and work your way in.
the White Light is about a mile offshore. Cutting the corner from either North or South, often ends badly. Rocks to the North, and Shoals to the South. Sure it takes a little bit longer but it's the prudent thing to do.
 

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Here's a satellite (Google Maps) view;
Ecoregion Map World Water Terrestrial plant
 
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Yup, looking at this inlet “with your own eyes” is a hell of a lot different than looking at a chart.

I find it a challenging game to look at a chart and then try to sort stuff out without looking at the GPS icon and data.

A couple of years ago I went out on a head boat with my grandson.

There is a place on the Delaware River where there is a harbor behind an old breakwater, under water about half the time. Gets a lot of boats. And another place with a long line of debries above Pea Patch Island. Also a “gotcha” zone.
 

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So, anyone looking at the charts Eherlihy posted should also note what I mean by the Shoal area dead ahead just inside the inlet. Note the deeper area to port just past the lighthouse. So, as I mentioned, once past the light you need to make a pretty hard turn to port.
 

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And here is an Aqua Maps representation of the inlet with the USACOE Survey overlay;
World Ecoregion Map Nature Rectangle

ETA - This chart and the ACOE data were downloaded today.
 
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