SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Forgive me if this is the wrong forum...

Im in process of purchasing a 30 footer in North Carolina...and have made some inquiries on delivery crews to bring the boat south to Florida. Since Ive never hired a delivery crew before, what questions should I be asking the delivery skipper? What are the pitfalls that I need to look out for?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
587 Posts
How about the basics like proof of insurance and at least a couple of references you can call and verify they had a good experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thats certainly a good start...
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,055 Posts
The ONLY place you should be getting a delivery captain is through a quality, local yacht broker. They only have top quality skippers on their rosters, well vetted and referenced.
"I know a guy", a friend of a friend, newspaper/magazine ads etc. just doesn't cut it if you want your boat moved in a timely manner, with little chance of damage.
YOU are responsible for supplying any insurance for the trip, other than perhaps a personal injury policy the captain might carry for himself and his crew. He supplies his documentation (license, resume) to YOUR insurance company, if they require. No delivery skipper could afford a blanket policy to cover all the boats he might sail over a year, or you couldn't afford him.
 

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
I disagree...and agree on some points

experience and good personal and professional recomendations are all a delivery skipper should provide...if he is on file at some brokerages or siling clubs thats cool but not the only place you should look.

good record of deliveries, good conduct...no driniking while delivering till you get to the dock etc...

too many people are all catched up on courses taken where, who, what, etc...what license etc...

isnurance is always provided by the owner of boat...

dont know how a captain carries insurance for that worldwide be neaerly impossible in my eyes like capta said.

anywhoo

ps. dont be fixated on dates and or times...but more on timely and correct stops, attention to detail...budget...and care of boat when arriving at destination...
 

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
where in ft lauderdale will you have the boat...I loved that place lived there for a while as did my grandfather for 30 years...too many power boaters though jajajaja
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Some good ideas in all the posts above. I'd check with your insurance company too to see if the company has any rules or requirements. Then I'd write a contract or memo that both parties (you and the delivery captain) sign, outlining the terms and amounts of money for various things that the delivery skipper can spend w/o getting additional approval from you. Be sure to give yourself a say in approving any crew the captain wants, and be sure to specify the level of cleanliness you expect when the boat is delivered. You can't think of everything in advance, and that is where one has to rely on the captain's judgment, but there are a lot of things that can be agreed upon to prevent misunderstandings down the road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,851 Posts
You need to know that whomever you hire has good credentials. How you get there can be varied, but other professionals you trust should be very helpful.

As discussed above, you will provide insurance on your vessel. It is possible, if your deliver skipper smacks her up, that your insurance company will try to pursue damages against the skipper called subrogation. That's not your problem, unless your skipper asks you to get a policy that waives subrogation. If so, your policy will cost even more. However, check with your insurance provider to be sure you have coverage at all. Often, you must pay extra for that one trip. I would say 50/50 in my experience. Depends on the waters, distance and skipper.

You should have no expectation that the delivery will work on a fixed schedule. Weather, maintenance, etc, will all cause delays. The one thing you may want to negotiate in advance, if not standard to the crew, is an on-water rate and a lower shore rate. Stinks to pay the same rate for the crew to sit around for a couple of days in a marina playing cards.

Finally, one too good to be true story. I was once steered toward a deliver captain that the seller's broker knew. Their price was half what it would have cost me to send a skipper to get it. As I began to ask questions, it took some serious prying to uncover the fact that this guy used deliveries to take his sailing club on week long cruises. This was going to be undisclosed, until I put him on the spot. Naturally, I sent my own skipper out to get her instead.
 
  • Like
Reactions: christian.hess

·
Registered
Joined
·
403 Posts
There are lots of reputable delivery companies. And a few no so reputable.
Some are 1 man operations.
Some sub contract to individual skippers who work for them.
most use 1 paid skipper with additional crew who may be paid or just along for expenses to gain experience.
Check out at least 3 or more ask for quote.

Compare with road transport you may be surprised.

If you find a few you can ask here or other forums for anyone with experience dealing with them.

having said that
I'm free in March.
No referances, Never delivered anyone elses boat.
Can't cook, can sail.
Take my car to Mr Lube would take boat if it fit the bay.
Ocasionaly sober.
Sail when I feel like it.
bring my dog as lookout.
don't smoke.
Slight flatulence after beer.

Easy but not cheep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,851 Posts
You know, a 30ft boat is not tough to take over the road. Not likely to need the keel dropped, probably not long enough to require special permits or chase vehicles. Much more reliable mode. Completely worth looking into anyway. Cost could be very similar. The difference is that over land trucking will be a fixed price, a delivery on her bottom is by the day, however many it takes.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jephotog

·
Mermaid Hunter
Joined
·
5,689 Posts
You should have no expectation that the delivery will work on a fixed schedule. Weather, maintenance, etc, will all cause delays. The one thing you may want to negotiate in advance, if not standard to the crew, is an on-water rate and a lower shore rate. Stinks to pay the same rate for the crew to sit around for a couple of days in a marina playing cards.
I'd put it a different way. My day rate is toward the upper end of the middle (see if you can figure that out *grin*). I don't charge for travel days to and from the boat, I don't charge for one provisioning day, and I don't charge for weather days. On the other hand, you do have to feed me from the time I leave home until I get back, and feed my crew from the time they step foot on the boat until they step off.

If I get to the boat and she isn't fit for the passage you have two choices: you pay for me to go home or you pay my hourly tech rate to fix the boat.

I'm not trying to sell my approach as the "right" one - just what is right for me and my clients. Read the fine print in any agreement your reach with a skipper, and if there is no fine print ask questions. Lots of questions.
 

·
Asleep at the wheel
Joined
·
3,017 Posts
Not to take away from those already named, but I'd also throw DavidPM in there. If I had the money (and need) to hire captain and pay for his transportation costs, etc, David, SVAuspicious and JonEisenberg are the ones I'd consider.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,181 Posts
I would also recommend that if you are not on the boat during the delivery that you make yourself available during the trip by cell phone.

It is not unusual for the owner, even a new owner to know some detail about a boat that can come in handy. Also if a decision has to be made if the owner is available many delivery captains will call the owner if it is a judgement issue that will cost money and could go either way.

I'll give you two examples:

1.
Engine is running hot maybe 190 after running hard for 4 hours. Called the owner and he informs me that he is pretty sure the temperature gauge runs hot as it has been like that for three years and his mechanic checked it out and said it was in range.
If it started to creep up to 195 and I couldn't reach the owner I might have been tempted to pull in somewhere and delay the trip unnecessarily.

2.
Was prepping the boat for moving and had to take some passengers so the head really needed to work. It would not pump. The owner was able to tell me he plumbed the head wrong and put the electric pump between the tank and the waste pump out. He thought the marina waste pump would pull the fluid from the tank through the boat pump. Of course he was wrong but he saved me enough time that I was able to jerry rig it in about two minutes before the pump out boat left for another marina which would have delayed our trip substantially.


You could argue that I should inspect the boat so that I know everything about the boat. I do my best in a couple hours but as you probably all know it takes a lot longer than that for a boat to give up even most of its secretes.

I carry Boat US tow insurance since it follows the person not the boat. It is pretty cheap and probably redundant but I did use it once when the owner forgot to renew his insurance and his engine failed in a dead calm in heavy fog. I was glad I had it as it save the guy a few hundred bucks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,181 Posts
Not to take away from those already named, but I'd also throw DavidPM in there. If I had the money (and need) to hire captain and pay for his transportation costs, etc, David, SVAuspicious and JonEisenberg are the ones I'd consider.
If your refereeing to me I'm flattered to be put in such good company.

As a side note I prefer the owner to be aboard if possible as it solves a lot of issues.
  • If the owner is new to the boat he/she gets to learn his boat right away.
  • If something breaks the owner is their to decide how fancy they want to get with the repair.
  • One less crew member needed
 

·
Mermaid Hunter
Joined
·
5,689 Posts
Free weather days is a steal. Hire this man!
Thanks for that. Not charging for weather days helps avoid bad decisions driven by money.

I would also recommend that if you are not on the boat during the delivery that you make yourself available during the trip by cell phone.
Available somehow. Text messages and e-mail work fine as long as the turn around is within a couple of hours. If I have to come in from offshore that is plenty of time after cell coverage to arrange a discussion before money has to be spent.

I'll give you two examples:
We all have great customer and boat stories. *grin*

I carry Boat US tow insurance since it follows the person not the boat.
Mostly. The Boat/US towing insurance you buy for your own boat does NOT cover a boat you are sailing for pay. Boat/US has a delivery program for a bit more money that DOES cover professional delivery skippers. Money well spent, and less than a day's pay. You do need to know what to ask for when you call Boat/US but it is worth the effort to avoid an uncovered tow (or more often on-the-water delivery of fuel filters) being billed back to the owner or--worse--you.

Besides, it's cool to have a Boat/US tow card that says "Delivery Captain" on it. *grin*
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,851 Posts
Personally, I would much rather get an initial text. When the phone rings in a meeting, I don't know if its because "we just arrived" or "we just broke down". Brief text lets me know if I should step out now, or call when I'm available. I guess every owner is different.

The ones I hate, just say "call me" with no context. Sometimes, even voicemails will just say "call me". I get panicked, then find out nothing is wrong at all.
 
  • Like
Reactions: davidpm

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,111 Posts
Depending upon where the point of origin is in NC, it is highly unlikely one would ever have a 'weather day' on this trip, you could always keep plugging away inside with an ICW-capable boat... Sure, you can have some wild, uncomfortable weather this time of year - I sat in Charleston with a Cape George 31 for a day last winter to ride out a SW gale - I could have proceeded if I really wanted to, and was more in the mood to take a day off after several long days, and an overnight coming down from Beaufort...The most likely weather feature to keep you from moving south along that route in March might be fog...

I would also recommend that if you are not on the boat during the delivery that you make yourself available during the trip by cell phone.

It is not unusual for the owner, even a new owner to know some detail about a boat that can come in handy. Also if a decision has to be made if the owner is available many delivery captains will call the owner if it is a judgement issue that will cost money and could go either way.

I'll give you two examples:

1.
Engine is running hot maybe 190 after running hard for 4 hours. Called the owner and he informs me that he is pretty sure the temperature gauge runs hot as it has been like that for three years and his mechanic checked it out and said it was in range.
If it started to creep up to 195 and I couldn't reach the owner I might have been tempted to pull in somewhere and delay the trip unnecessarily.
Two diagnostic tools I usually try to pack on a new boat, or one I know they are not likely to be aboard, are a tiny multimeter, and an infrared thermometer... Engine gauges are often unreliable, and a thermometer with a laser pointer is a great thing to have in hand when doing a running engine check. They've gotten so cheap nowadays - under $15 on eBay - there's no excuse for not having one aboard any boat today...

Also, your hand is as good a gauge as any if you're in doubt about the running coolant temperature... If it's running normally, most people should be able to put their hand on the header tank for a brief period - perhaps a full second or more - before wanting to pull it away... If it's running much above 195-200, you'll know it immediately upon touching, one's sense of touch can be amazingly accurate in that particular temperature range :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,851 Posts
Other thoughts, as an owner that has hired delivery crews.

A crew that will run 24/7 on the outside, which sounds like it will be done faster and less expensively, will cost way more than a daylight only crew. Makes sense, as they will need more crew and need to be more skilled.

Also, top up the diesel. Delivery crews don't sail unless conditions are perfect for it. Some, not even then. Sorry guys, just my experience.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jimgo
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top