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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All

I am in the process of installing a depth sounder with a shoot thru hull transducer. I have used a toilet bowl wax ring to test the install and now want to permanently install the PVC tube that will hold the transducer. My issue is that the hull now has residue from the wax ring where I want to glass in the tube. Any suggestions on what I can use to remove the remaining wax residue from the hull?

Thanks,
John
 

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hello all

i am in the process of installing a depth sounder with a shoot thru hull transducer. I have used a toilet bowl wax ring to test the install and now want to permanently install the pvc tube that will hold the transducer. My issue is that the hull now has residue from the wax ring where i want to glass in the tube. Any suggestions on what i can use to remove the remaining wax residue from the hull?

Thanks,
john
wd-40
 

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Ok revised approach. Don't spread it around! Use a plastic bondo applicator to scrape
it off, then the solvent then the soap and water. Test different methods put a small smear on glass and try to get it all off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Thanks for all of the replies, I'll try a few of the suggestions starting with soap/hot water and mineral spirits. I considered just using the wax ring as a permanent install but decided that it wasn't strong enough. The transducer is being mounted in a storage locker under a quarter berth and I see the potential for other items knocking it loose in the case of rough sailing conditions.

I have been playing with a heat gun and paint thinner, applying the wax to a scrape piece of wood here at home. The wax melts easily enough but I don't want to melt it only to have it penetrate further into the fibreglass.

John
 

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John--

The WD40 previously mentioned and/or "Goof Off" (Home Depot/Lowes) will work. For future reference, a through-hull transducer can be tested by filling a zip-lock bag with water or mineral oil and fastening it in place on the hull with a length of tape. The transducer can be positioned on that for testing.

FWIW...
 

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have you thought about leaving it with the wax?

plenty of folks have just it like that...jeje

thats my plan too
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hello all

An update

I ended up using a heat gun to soften up the wax then a combination of goof off, mineral spirits and soapy water to cleanup the residue. Repeated several times. The area in question has been cleaned, sanded and is ready for epoxy.

I considered using the wax as a permanent install but preferred epoxy with the transducer in a pvc tube in an effort to protect the transducer from any stuff that might be floating around the storage locker(where the transducer will be installed) during heavy weather.

I didn't like using wax in the first place but was unable to get a reading using the zip lock bag method. As well, in part due to my rookieness relative to this type of install, I wanted to test the full install using the transducer mounted in the PVC pipe held in place with a wax ring. Epoxy is a pain to remove if things don't go well :)

I still can't quite understand how a transducer mounted in a liquid filled tube can shoot thru a hull and at the same time bounce a signal back when it hits terra firma. Regardless my test was successful, the meter was quite accurate, adjusting its signal by a 1/10 of a foot just by rocking the boat.


Thanks for all of the replies.
John
 
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awesome sounds like a plan

quick question you say the bag trick didnt work for you? or that the only test you did was in fact using wax?

cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I did 4 tests;
First the transducer tossed over the side of the boat, worked well.

Second the transducer in zip lock bag filled with water, pressed down on the hull where I wanted to install, no luck getting a reading.

Third the transducer pressed onto the inside of the hull using toilet bowl wax, worked well.

Forth the transducer mounted into a pvc pipe filled with water. The pvc pipe was mounted to the inside of the hull using a wax ring. Worked well.

As I mentioned epoxy is so damn permanent I wanted to make such everything was right before I do the final install. Hopefully early this week. Sorta like measuring 4 times and cutting once :)

John
 
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Thanks for all of the replies, I'll try a few of the suggestions starting with soap/hot water and mineral spirits. I considered just using the wax ring as a permanent install but decided that it wasn't strong enough. The transducer is being mounted in a storage locker under a quarter berth and I see the potential for other items knocking it loose in the case of rough sailing conditions.

I have been playing with a heat gun and paint thinner, applying the wax to a scrape piece of wood here at home. The wax melts easily enough but I don't want to melt it only to have it penetrate further into the fibreglass.

John
John, The soap and water is a waste of time. The wax is a hydrocarbon and will dissolve with a hydrocarbon solvent; naphtha is the best solvent for it and I think you will find it in the paint department. (As a chemist I worked in the wax, petrolatum and white oil laboratory of a major chemical company formerly.):)
 

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That wax is soluble in organic solvents (naphtha, mineral spirits, lighter fluid), not in polar solvents like acetone, water, ammonia, etc.).
Seaduction - educate me (us?). I thought Acetone was a powerful dewaxing agent. Is toilet wax an annimal/fat-based wax, as opposed to a plant wax? Canuba wax I know is a plant-based wax...I'd be interested in a quick explanation! Around the boat I use Acetone a lot, in restoring furniture I use mineral spirits...thanks...
 

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Seaduction - educate me (us?). I thought Acetone was a powerful dewaxing agent. Is toilet wax an annimal/fat-based wax, as opposed to a plant wax? Canuba wax I know is a plant-based wax...I'd be interested in a quick explanation! Around the boat I use Acetone a lot, in restoring furniture I use mineral spirits...thanks...
Most of the waxes (except beeswax, earwax and carnauba, and a few others that occur naturally) are derived from petroleum (crude oil). Crude oil is distilled in a refinery to separate hydrocarbons according to their boiling range from the lightest gases (c1 through c5), light distillates(gasoline, naphtha, kerosene), heavy distillates (lube oil, heating oil) and what remains is normally an asphaltic residue depending on the nature of the crude oil. Lube oils are dewaxed in the refinery to reduce their congealing point and the resultant wax product is then used for many applications. Some waxes are very paraffinic (straight chain hydrocarbons) and others are microcrystalline waxes (branched chain hydrocarbons). Toilet bowl wax is the latter type. Candle wax is predominantly the former.
 
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