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Second year with my new to me Tartan 30 and tomorrow I am taking out my first guests (kind of(cept for a close friend)). My mother in law, who is cool and her boyfriend. I am just wanting it to be fun for them and am curious what other folks do on a typical day sail on the lake? Appreciate any comments/advice. Looking like 2-3 mph gusting to 5 as far as wind. I told them there was a low wind warning.
 

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For me, a successful sail with guests, no matter how long, starts with the planning about a week ahead of time. I make sure the menu works for everyone, the boat is clean, there are extra sheets and pillows on board just in case. For a daysail I like to have our food/ice/beverages/etc. loaded before they arrive so their time on the water is maximized. I usually plan to sail/motor within a couple hours of the marina. This allows time to get the sails up if conditions allow but not have to motor too far if there is no wind, anchor for lunch and get back to the marina in plenty of time so guests don't have to rush home. Especially since first timers don't realize how tired they will be after a day on the water and our marina is quite a drive for all of our friends. I try to find someplace scenic and if anyone has a propensity towards seasickness, an anchorage that's protected to hopefully give him/her a chance to recover in calm water before the return sail/motor.

My general rule is that the first time you're on our boat, there is no need to bring anything or do much other than enjoy the sail.

I also let them know that as amazing as we are, we don't yet control the weather. I start checking the weather three days ahead. The night before if I decide the weather may be iffy I let them know and give them the chance to back out and go another time or take a chance that they won't be leaving the dock. Fortunately, Rock Hall has plenty to do even if we're tied to the dock so it's usually not a wasted trip for anyone regardless of weather.
 

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Typical day sail for me is to leave the dock about 10 a.m., (I'm too old and lazy to get out of bed at the crack of dawn. Fire up the tin Lizzy, motor down the Havre de Grace channel, (only when the wind's blowing out of a southerly direction), put up the sails, and head southeast on a close haul or beam reach, depending on the normal summer wind direction. Most of the time, the wind's not blowing more than 10 to 12, which provides me with speeds to 6 or 7 mph, not much heeling, a very comfortable ride.

Next, I give the helm to one of the beautiful ladies onboard, go below and mix them a Green Coconut Margaretta, break out some snack food, chips, crackers, dip, smoked salmon, etc..., then relax in the cockpit while they leisurely sail down the bay.

Then we find a sheltered anchorage, I fire up the gas grill, grill some burgers, Kielbasa, saute some onions and peppers and serve them lunch, along with a second Green Coconut Margaretta.

If the wind cooperates, we'll turn back toward Havre de Grace, sail up the channel and hopefully make it back to the marina before dark, I'll button up the boat, kiss the ladies goodbye, and drive home after one more wonderful day on the water.



Another fun day in Paradise,

Gary :cool:
 

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We have a lot of barrier islands, located 8 -12 miles offshore. A typical daysail is to sail out to one of them, anchor, eat some lunch, maybe go ashore and walk on the beach for a little while, and then up anchor and have a leisurely sail back home. And, sometimes, just stay and spend 1, 2 or 3 days. :D
 

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I will quite often wrap up a day sail by anchoring within 15 minutes motoring distance of our slip, and sometimes this ends up being the best part of the trip. If you end up with low winds, consider anchoring in a nearby scenic spot and just enjoying the quiet.
 

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I expect a mint on my pillow.
First sail you're a guest. subsequent sails, you get to help make the magic happen: load supplies, tote ice, fill the water tanks, and if you are a Coors Lite (or similar) drinker, buy your own (and take any left over off the boat with you).

When I sailed on Melissa's (Melrna) boat, she really did put chocolates on the pillows. :)

To a certain point we view the boat as an extension of our home. If I invite you over to spend the day by the pool, I don't expect you to help pay for chlorine or clean the house.

I do like to make people feel welcome on the boat and one of the first lessons I learned that stuck with me was that there is no reason to serve bad food. Good food doesn't have to equal expensive or complicated to prepare if you know how to cook. Some things can be prepared ahead of time. I've made a big pot of beef stew the night before, duct taped the lid on to transport, and re- heated it on the boat the next day.

On the other hand, if we're invited on someone else's boat, knowing what goes into sailing it, we have no problems helping out however we can. Your boat, your way of doing things, NOT a problem. John will even drink your Budweiser (I'm not really a beer drinker).
 

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Moody 425
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For a daysail with guests we are a bit like Donna in that we like to be prepared and put the focus on a good time without too much stress.
Ideally a short upwind sail in the morning, lunch at anchor somewhere nice( fire up the grill), swimming, a walk ashore then relaxed downwind sail home.

I like to give a relaxed but proper safety briefing as well. I like to give guests a stint on the helm because there is nothing more magic than seeing the glint in their eyes as they start to realise this is pretty special.

It sounds like you will not have much wind. Good food, good company, a bottle of something nice and let mother nature does the rest :)
 

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A daysail for me is more about the sailing and less about a party. I'll typically bring along some basic snacks (chips and guac, carrots and hummus, that sort of hand food) and maybe a 6 pack if it is appropriate for the people aboard. Often guests bring snacks, last weekend two friends brought watermelon and some homemade baked goods that were excellent.

I show up about 30 minutes before the proposed meeting time and make sure that the boat is pretty tidy, remove the sail covers, and rig the main halyard and spinnaker sheets.

Before going I show everyone where the PFDs are and figure out everyone's sailing experience. We motor out past the breakwater and put fenders and docklines away at that time. A typical 3-4 hour sail has us head southwest along Bainbridge Island until you get a nice view of downtown Seattle or beam reach across to Port Madison and duck into Hidden Cove. We might hove-to for a few minutes to enjoy the view and some snacks, then head back across.

I like to give guests the chance to steer while I handle sail trim. If the winds are light we'll often fly the spinnaker on the way back.

Once back at the marina we put the boat away. I sometimes stay around afterwords and give it a quick rinse.

There is no chocolate on our pillows for a day sail. There are rarely pillows for a day sail, I keep the boat cushions at home when we aren't cruising.
 

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For us, a quick trip to the Vineyard is usually the daysail. It's about an hour each way and when the usual SWer cooperates, it's an easy beam reach. We have lunch and a swim at the Vineyard on a mooring or on the hook.

We always offer our guests a chance to participate in sailing if they are interested. Helm time, winch grinding, navigation, etc. I think the trick is to not go to either extreme, don't turn it into sailing class unless that's really what they want, but also don't turn them into passive passengers, unless that's really what they want.

Like others, I've usually got the boat ready before anyone arrives, and do the cleanup after everyone leaves. If you become a regular, I'll put you to work on these before and after tasks.
 

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Depending on who it is (if I can't figure out if you would appreciate it or not, I don't know you well enough to invite you on the boat), I email a humorous yet firm first time sailing letter that includes general safety stuff, the concept of marina facilities, the boat's head, go-no go decision, our marina rest room combination in case they get there before we do, etc.

We have boat cards. I'm considering putting the marina facility combination on it. That way any guests can keep it on them and they don't have to worry about finding one of us to pee. I just have to remember that I even have the cards. I think I've handed out three in five years.

And yes, if they want to take the helm and I have the sense that they won't screw up too badly, they are more than welcome.
 

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Depending on who it is (if I can't figure out if you would appreciate it or not, I don't know you well enough to invite you on the boat), I email a humorous yet firm first time sailing letter that includes general safety stuff, the concept of marina facilities, the boat's head, go-no go decision, our marina rest room combination in case they get there before we do, etc.
Thats a great idea. We have done similar in the past for crew coming onboard for longer passages but it is also a great idea for daysails.
 

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Yes, everyone that goes out with me gets to go home with a photo of them at the helm. :D
Ha! I took that picture. Gary was nice enough to take my (ex) sister in law (pictured) and a former boating class student out for a day sail. She has a death grip on the wheel because 1) it was her first time and we were motor sailing up a narrow channel with about 1 foot of depth on either side and 2) she gets motion sickness. Which reminds me that I always tell first timers that it's perfectly ok to get sick. Sometimes people don't even know they get sick if they've never been on a boat before. I get sick sometimes and we keep a dedicated puke bucket on board. It's bright red so easily found when needed. I don't know what triggers it in me. Seems to be random. Well, one day it was the hot wings and too many cocktails the night before. I learned my lesson.
 

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I usually go to the boat the night before, especially if guests are coming. I piddle around but make sure the v-berth is closed up (sail locker underneath) and clean linen all around. Get the fridge and sometimes the freezer going.

Guests do as much driving as they like and as much grinding as they will.

I've made a big pot of beef stew the night before, duct taped the lid on to transport, and re- heated it on the boat the next day.
Google Lock-n-Lock. *grin*

We might hove-to for a few minutes to enjoy the view and some snacks, then head back across.
Grammar police warning.

"We might heave to"

"We were hove to"

Depending on conditions we often heave to for lunch. Faster and easier for me and interesting for guests.

I usually stay on the boat the night after a day sail also. After all, everything is so clean and lovely.

Oh -- I carry a spare joker valve and when reviewing the head operation I pass it around for inspection. Everyone understands that everything has to go through that. I also make it clear that if anyone clogs the head I will stand behind them and hand them tools and dispense advice. Works a charm. I haven't had a clog since 2006.
 

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...

Google Lock-n-Lock. *grin*

...
Have those. Love them. But with something like stew, I only have one thing to clean if I transport it in the pot. :) And, if it's for 15 like it was the last time, it was made in a 12 quart pot, which is not kept on the boat. Also, with that quantity, I'd have to use multiple plastic containers, then clean them all, etc. Logistically, it was just easier to go home to boat with it still in the pot.

Spare joker valve demo is brilliant.
 

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Re: Describe your typical daysail if you would.

I haven't taken anyone other than the ADMIRAL(who is also sometimes the first mate, and has been my only land mate for 40+ years).

But when I used to go out with friends, it depended on the size of the boat. In big boats above 26 feet. I just sat on a chair or in the cockpit cushion and now and then they would let me handle the jib for tacking. There were no preps.

On smaller boats, the skipper was careful to give me a list of things to remember:

1. Bring your own PFD, if you have one, since you probably won't like how the one I give you fits.

2. Remember I only have a portapotty, and if you were to do #2 before you come, that would be good. And...you probably won't really want to be using the portapotty for #1 if you don't have to, and might even prefer peeing off the boat---even though this is clearly against the law. The sklipper clearly wanted me to not be using his limited facilities on his small boat.

3. Remember that the water up here is down right cold even during summer, and that cold spray will get you soaked in a bad way, so bring a waterproof windbreaker if you have one.(I went out on a friend's 30 foot motor boat last week and only brought a wind breaker. On the way back the seas got windy and with 3 foot swells, and I got rather wet, and my water resistant windbreaker was not working for me---I should have known better).

4. Consider taking a seasick med about 45 minutes before we leave just as a precaution. Heck, I even do that sometimes. It doesn't work as well after you are already dry heaving over the side.

5. The skipper, took a little time to show me the vhf radio, channel 16, and the procedures for contacting the CG on it. He also showed me the equipment that they used(more recently a lifesling system) for getting someone back aboard. He also showed me where we were going on the chart for the day--shallow water we were avoiding, etc. Sometimes he would do a COB drill near the beginning, not because he was afraid I would fall out, but because he wanted me to know what we would do if someone did. I admit that these things made me feel more a part of the crew.

6. Skipper made it clear that there was no alcohol on the boat and that he had a no drinking policy while out on the water.

7. Bring a small lunch since he wasn't planning on serving anything other than brownies or choco chip cookies, and water.(brownies and water for crew only).

8. He told me to remember to bring a hat, sunglasses, sunscreen, and something to hold my glasses on so they don't fall in the water, and a zip lock bag for my camera or anything else that I don't want to see getting wet.

That's all I can remember at the moment.
 

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But with something like stew, I only have one thing to clean if I transport it in the pot. :) And, if it's for 15 like it was the last time, it was made in a 12 quart pot, which is not kept on the boat.
Ah. Now I follow. I completely agree with minimizing clean up.
 

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On the vary rare occasion I take anyone out that isn't there for the sailing, I get them to help out with the snacks if they want to. Anchoring and swimming isn't an option up here, so generally we sail all day, might heave to for lunch or more likely just continue to sail while everyone eats. People can do as much or as little as they want.
Quick pre-departure briefing and off we go.
 
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