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Remember you're a womble
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Dickinson Newport diesel heater, older model of course but still basically the same as the new ones. I didn't install it, came with the boat so I assume it worked OK at some point.
Anyway, it runs off a dedicated tank mounted about 12" above the height of the metering vale, gravity fed fuel. I've checked that the vent is clear (even tried with the filler cap off).
I get fuel to the metering valve, checked the debris screen and it's all clear, I get fuel out of the metering valve at about the right rate (haven't had a proper measurement but it drips out, and the drips get quicker as I open the valve more), I get fuel to the bottom of the entry pipe to the burner. That's as far as the fuel gets.
When I open the valve fully, no fuel gets into the burner itself. I have put a pipe on the outlet tube in the burner and I can suck fuel through so there is no blockage.
Manual says that on full opening, the burner should get a tablespoon or so of fuel in a few minutes. I get none.
Any diesel heater experts out that there can suggest something?
 

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Remember you're a womble
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah, I've read the manual several times, and tapped everything in sight, no difference, plus pulling the fuel right through to the burner should have freed any locks.
 

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Remember you're a womble
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've read the manuals, I have done everything suggested in there, it doesn't make any difference. I can't figure out why, gravity feed, should be as simple as it gets but there is no fuel getting to the burner, it stops somewhere in the vertical burner tube. If I blow down the tube, fuel sprays into the burner pot, but with the valve open, no fuel flows into the burner.
 

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Remember you're a womble
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, unless anyone has any bright ideas, I think I'll just have to start at one end of the system and work my way through the whole thing until I uncover any problems. It's got to be something simple.
 

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This is what I did with mine. Removing the clean-out plug was the trick. And I was surprised to find out how much carbon build up was in the bottom of the tube.
Hope this works for you.
Cleaning the Fuel Line
Any blockage in the fuel line from the oil-metering valve to the burner can
be cleaned by removing the clean-out plug situated directly under the burner.
The fuel lines themselves can be cleaned with compressed air or a pipe
cleaner or even blowing air through to remove any blockages. The plug then
must be replaced with tape sealant and checked for leaks. Tap the fuel line
once re-connected to clear any air locks.
 

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Remember you're a womble
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2,328 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yep, already had the clean-out plug out as well. Was only a few specks of crap on it.
 

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Remember you're a womble
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Nope, unless I mount the tank above decks and that is going to be a little awkward :)
I assume the head is OK, the heater definitely worked at some point.
 

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Can you moderately pressurize the tank and see if anything 'pushes' through? Might be a way to clear an airlock. It wouldn't take a lot of pressure if there's no physical blockage.
 

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Check with the Po if possible to see what fuel he used. I remember something in the manual about adjusting for different viscosity fuel , diesel , kero, stove fuel etc.
 

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I would try a bit of kero I believe it is a bit thinner than D2. If stove fuel is thinner I might be tempted to try that. How much fuel is in the tank? If almost empty it might not work.

To create a bit of pressure you might try to see if an alcohol stove (pressurised) cap fits.

Sent from my ADR6425LVW using Tapatalk
 

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Remember you're a womble
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
No idea on the PO, however since the tank is full of diesel that I didn't put there, I can only assume that it was diesel before and continues to be so. If the flow rate out of the bottom of the metering valve is correct, then the fuel viscosity is correct as well. I'll double check the rate next time I am up there but as I said originally, it's in the right ballpark and it would only flow slower, not not at all.
It's all just odd. Only think I can think of is air is getting into the system somehow, that would not let the fuel level in the burner pipe rise above the point where the air was coming in correct? Maybe the seal on the metering valve is shot, fuel still flows through it but air comes in from the valve itself when open.
 

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Not sure of your particular model but my experience with gravity feed burners has been condensation in the lines and carb, stuck needle and seat at the float and most common ,carbon buildup in the fuel port in the burner. It can go way in . a good reaming and blow out is the cure. Turning the stove too low at night is the cause. Lighter stove oil burns cleaner and will require carb float adjustment Carb should be on same fore/aft line as burner. I used to switch from summer diesel to winter stove mainly because engine ran on same day tank. ps inspect the temp cut off on the carb. If the PO it got too hot and melted the plug it won't work until replaced A pulse pump in line will do wonders
 
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