SailNet Community banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Looking for ideas for deploying and recovering our new to us 8'
fibreglass dinghy from the bow or our Oday 272. its about 70 lbs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,354 Posts
Tricky. you could hook the jib halyard to the bow eye of the dinghy. One person can winch it up while someone guides it over to the rail. Lift it over the rail using the halyard and lower it into the water. Hang on to the tether. Reverse procedure for getting it back on board.

Or, Two people could lift it and toss it over the side, right side up of course. Then lift it out with halyard. Careful not to scratch up the hull of the Oday.

Edit. Looking at your boat..it looks like you have single lifelines and the dinghy might slide under the lifeline stern 1st and into the water. Your freeboard looks low enough that you could do this easily enough by yourself. Maybe have an old piece of carpet handy to protect the toe rail.
 

·
no longer reading SailNet
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
I have a similar size dinghy (just under 8' Dyer Dhow Midget) and sailboat (almost 29' Pearson 28-2).

I made a lifting bridle for our dinghy that connects to the bow and stern up fairly high. It is a 2 point bridle so that we can rotate it upside down.

We use the spinnaker halyard on a winch to lift the dinghy. Sometimes to make it really easy we first hoist a block and tackle on the spin halyard, then use that to lift the dinghy. I think that the block and tackle would also make it easier to do solo, because I can do all of the lifting and dinghy management from the foredeck.

Typically one of us is on the lifting line and the other is managing the dinghy to keep it from hitting the big boat. As we get it up over the life lines we swing it above the foredeck, flip it over (remember the 2-point lifting bridle) and place it on 3 throwable cushions. It is tied down with those as padding to keep the dinghy from rubbing on the foredeck. I tie it down to the two bow cleats and to two sliding eyes mounted forward on the genoa rails. The back of the dinghy is right up against the mast.

I have an idea that I'm going to try this year which I think will make it even easier. I'm adding an additional set of shackles to the front of the lifelines which will allow me to unclip them from the bow pulpit. I can then put down a piece of carpet along the toerail and pull the dinghy up along there. We won't have to raise the dinghy as far or work as hard to keep it off of the boat. I think that this should allow me to do the whole thing myself.

Our dinghy is the perfect size for our sailboat. There is plenty of room for foredeck access to work with sails. It is short enough that I can easily get it out of the way of the anchor locker so that we can anchor while the dinghy is onboard.

I don't know if your dinghy has a mast and sails, but ours does. I keep the centerboard and rudder for that in the laz. The mast and boom are tied together and stored under the spinnaker pole along the starboard stanchions. All of this can fit under the dinghy, but somehow I find it easier to store them elsewhere. We also use take-apart oars which we can store in the dinghy or inside the laz.
 

·
no longer reading SailNet
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
Finally, this may sound like a pain compared to an inflatable (which are a little lighter and easier to toss around), but you are going to love the rigid dink. Ours rows so nicely that I rarely bother with the motor anymore, and sailing around the anchorage in the evening is a lot of fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
thanks for all the responses. Yes we love the rigid dink. it gets on plane with one on board with just 3.5 hp and its very stable.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top