SailNet Community banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,113 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My friend has a Catalina 30 and is thinking about getting a dinghy. Towing one is possible of course but a pain. He will never spring for davits and it seems like a c30 is a little small for that solution.
The for-deck is the most likely place of course but it seems it will be a little tight for a normal size dinghy.

I have a sit-a-top kayak we have used in the past but, but that gets a little wet and only takes two people. I'm wondering what else people have used successfully.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
Sportyak

Tell your freind to check out the sportyak and the new 245 model by BIC. I think the sportyak is 45 pounds.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,489 Posts
An 8foot zodiac would fit quite nicely on the foredeck of a C30 and will handle 4 persons for trips ashore.

They can often be found on Craigslist and similar buy-sell listings for reasonable money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Nesting dinghy

Or consider a nesting dinghy: it comes apart in two halves (fore/aft) so the fore part nests inside the aft part. There are plans on the internet. Or, with a little careful planning, you could take a stock dink, saw it in half, make the thwarts removeable/replaceable, a little thinking about how you bolt it back together, and there you are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,278 Posts
I am a bit leery of towing since you never know when you might get caught out in less than benign conditions. My dingy flipped while being towed last year and I lost my seat bag with the pump and I don't remember what else plus it stripped the number plates with the registration numbers. At least I had the sense to have the outboard on the pulpit rail and the oars in the lazerette or they'd be gone too.

This year I've tried the dink on the foredeck of my Catalina 36 and hate it. I'd have to put down padeyes to adequately secure it without creating a trip hazard, and its a magnet for the sheets when tacking. I'm back to towing but if there is any threat of weather I'll deflate the thing, roll it up and store it at the base of the mast. That way it'll be out of the area where you need to move on deck and won't catch the sheets.
 

·
One of None
Joined
·
8,045 Posts
I've towed a dink quite a bit and have also stored it on the foredeck. I'd rather tow it. It's not a pain at all IMHO sometimes it's a concern when going in reverse for docking, other then that I't works out ok for me.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
Towing our 10-foot RIB can cost half a knot to a knot of boat speed, even with the engine on the rail. If we're going any distance at all we partially deflate it and put it on the foredeck. The time it takes to put up & down is more than made up for with the time we save sailing faster.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,113 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Towing our 10-foot RIB can cost half a knot to a knot of boat speed, even with the engine on the rail. If we're going any distance at all we partially deflate it and put it on the fore-deck. The time it takes to put up & down is more than made up for with the time we save sailing faster.

What is the inflation, deflation process like. Never done it. What do you use to inflate, how long does it take etc.
 

·
SailGunner
Joined
·
57 Posts
Towing our 10-foot RIB can cost half a knot to a knot of boat speed, even with the engine on the rail. If we're going any distance at all we partially deflate it and put it on the foredeck. The time it takes to put up & down is more than made up for with the time we save sailing faster.
Isn't a 10' RIB pretty heavy? How do you lift it on the deck?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,278 Posts
What is the inflation, deflation process like. Never done it. What do you use to inflate, how long does it take etc.
It takes about 15 minutes or so using a foot pump to pump up our 8' Zodiac. Its not too bad at all, but you wouldn't want to do it every day unless you had to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,278 Posts
Isn't a 10' RIB pretty heavy? How do you lift it on the deck?
What we do, and what I suspect eyrka does, is lift the dingy with a halyard/winch.

I have two options depending on how lazy I feel. One would work with a rib an one would probably need some modification. I can attach a block to the halyard and hoist it 15' or so above the deck with another line through it running from the lifting harness on the dink to my anchor windlass capstan and hoist it using amp power. This way would work with a rib as well.

If I'm not that lazy or want to save juice I can just attach the halyard directly to the lifting bridle and grind the dink high enough to come on deck using a cabin top winch. This method might need to be modified to lead to a primary winch for a Rib though due to the extra weight.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
What we do, and what I suspect eyrka does, is lift the dingy with a halyard/winch.

I have two options depending on how lazy I feel. One would work with a rib an one would probably need some modification. I can attach a block to the halyard and hoist it 15' or so above the deck with another line through it running from the lifting harness on the dink to my anchor windlass capstan and hoist it using amp power. This way would work with a rib as well.

If I'm not that lazy or want to save juice I can just attach the halyard directly to the lifting bridle and grind the dink high enough to come on deck using a cabin top winch. This method might need to be modified to lead to a primary winch for a Rib though due to the extra weight.
Yes, this is pretty much what we do. Even if we're grinding by hand without using the windlass, we use the spin halyard plus block method. If you just use a halyard direct to the winch, the dink will want to hang right next to the mast. If you use a block on the spin halyard, with a line from dink up through block and down to windlass, the dink will want to hang (in our case) about 6 feet forward of the mast, centered over the foredeck.

Our RIB was built with 4 eye straps, one in each corner of the floor. We built a lifting bridle through those straps; this lets us hoist the dinghy flat instead of vertically, so it doesn't have to be raised as high.

With a bellows-type foot pump inflating it from completely empty only takes 15-20 minutes. When the dink is on deck we partially deflate it for two reasons: (1) it helps our visibility; (2) full tubes in the hot sun can over-inflate, stressing and shortening the life of the hypalon.
 

·
cruising all I can
Joined
·
917 Posts
I prefer A hard dinghy as it is a bit more durable, and I seem to be rough on equipment sometimes.
When towing it does drag a knot or less. and as I'm sailing a Bayliner Buccaneer 325 I'm not exactly breaking the sound barrier !
So when going outside, or wanting tomake better time or fearing weather conditions hazardous to towing. I found I can make good use of the swim platform by hoisting the dinghy up onto it on it's stern w/ a couple of small bumpers under it for cushioning. Than lash it to the almost vertical stern with the topside of the dinghy against the stern (bottom facing aft) it kind of clam-shells ths stern and as it's standing upright doesn't "scoop" air/or water if we heel excessively.
When it comes time to deploy, I just let the lashings loose and WHAM, it slaps the water ! (pretty dramatic the first time or two!)
The swim platform is 1 1/2 foot deep and almost as wide as the 8-10' stern.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top