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Who makes dinghies with high pressure inflatable floors?

So far the only ones I have found are: Walker Bay (looks nice but only review says it is not durable) and Zodiac (not available in Hypalon).

Thanks for your help.
 

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Most EVERYONE! Just about every manufacturer makes a model with the high pressure inflatable floor. We just got our 9 footer with the inflatable floor and keel from Saturn. West Marine, Zodiac...

Dave
 

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I bought my Saturn 11.5 (110 lbs) from boatstogo for $1k. It has the hard air floor. They tell you to cover it with carpet or vinyl flooring to protect it from puncture. For example ferrying dogs around.
So far it's been a good deal. I figure if i get 5 years out of it i will have saved a bunch. When i move south or elsewhere i'll upgrade to a hypalon with hard bottom.
 

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Wow, I'm surprised at all the positive comments about the inflatable floor dinks. Down here in the Caribbean, I've never met anyone who has had one or has one that has anything good to say about them.
 

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Not sure i had positive comments. I would prefer a hard floor dinghy like my last one. I didn't see having to buy one of the expensive models just for limited summer cruising. if i were down south; i would like a hard bottom hypalon for the durability.
 

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Hard floors are...hard to roll up. If you leave your dinghy inflated, a hard floor is probably easier, since there's less work (no inflating) and less to go wrong (deflating). Hard floors can make stowage more difficult if you need to stow your dinghy below for passages, for example. A hard floor might make a dinghy heavier, too. It might help to have a hard floor if you have to travel at higher speeds for long distance mooring spots. An inflatable floor is better than a simple fabric floor because is lends rigidity to the dinghy and adds flotation. All three work. You pays your money and makes your choices.
 

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Wow, I'm surprised at all the positive comments about the inflatable floor dinks. Down here in the Caribbean, I've never met anyone who has had one or has one that has anything good to say about them.
I agree. I don't think I've met anyone that's had a high pressure air deck inflatable for any time that's remained too thrilled with it. I wish I had known that before I bought ours. Then, preparing for cruising, folks kept telling me I needed the biggest dinghy I could manage with the biggest outboard it would take and the air deck seemed the ticket. In retrospect, I would have been better off with the smallest dinghy that would have met our needs with the smallest, lightest, outboard that would power it. Hindsight is always 20-20, eh?
 

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Having had two inflatable floor dinghies and now a RIB, I'll never buy a inflatable floor again. I would buy a wood or slat floor first.
 

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What are the main drawbacks of a hard inflatable floor? At first glance it seems like a good idea...
 

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I went from the wood floor to the hard inflatable floor. I liked the wood floor much better. Felt more solid and is slip resistant. I do like the portability of the boat and floor. I no longer have to stow the floor separtately.

I bought my current one when my hypalon basically gave up the ghost. I couldn't justify spending the big bucks right now as we are not actively cruising. I got the bigger boat to be able to haul the whole family more comfortably.
My friends that are active cruisers recommend a 10-15 hp 2 stroke. Not for every day use (though it is used everday), but for back up power. IE. in case you need to pull yourself a minor grounding or you plan a day trip of some distance. In addition; i have seen the happiest people with RIBS; less worry.
 

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Did she call that an STD330? And who's outboard is she calling short shaft? :laugher

I like the idea of a rigid inflatable floor, but I can see that they might be less durable. Seems to me that for weekend use they would be nice, as they are quick to set up and store in one piece. For full time cruising I don't think they are likely going to last.

Has anyone ever made a diy rigid inflatable boat?
 

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I have had a couple of Avon inflatables - a RIB, a rollup using plastic slats that linked together and now an Achilles with the hard inflatable floor.
15 HP 2 stroke Mercury.
Wanted to be able to transport 2 divers with all gear at planning speeds.
Wanted to be able to stow it on my Crealock 37.

RIB was a pain for stowing on deck and the weight of getting it out of the water and on the boat. Climbing over and around to work the foredeck....

The roll-up worked well but after 13 years in the sun was beginning to develop new leaks too quickly. Avon no longer makes the roll-up.

The Achilles has been great, its about a foot longer then the Avon but lighter.
The entire boat is Hypalon including the inflatable floor. Its quite easy to bring on deck, deflate, pack it up and stow it down below, normally underneath the main salon table.

I not sure any other manufacture makes a hypalon inflatable floor. The Avon hypalon tubes with a PVC inflatable floor. I was looking hard at a Mercury model with hypalon tubes but it turn out to only come with a PVC inflatable floor.

There is no way I want PVC anything in my inflatable after seeing how quickly PVC inflatables fall apart if exposed to the sun.

Regards
Marc Hall
Crazy Fish - Maintaining, Upgrading and Sailing a Crealock 37
 

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Check out Coastal Inflatable. I've looked at these at the New England Boat Show. I think they are the best made and best value. I've talked with the owner quite a bit and he has the boats custom made to his specs. Owner is very nice. No hard sell.

Will

Coastal Inflatable Boats
 

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The Saturn seems to be the same boat as the Coastal Boat, but the Saturn is at a cheaper price. With the Saturn you only get a 2 year warranty, yet that can be extended to 5 years(same as the Coastal) for an extra 100. Even at that it(the Saturn) still appears cheaper. Not sure how much the chaps are worth that you get free with the Coastal.
 

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We have a mercury dinghy with a high pressure floor up here in the PNW. It works well for us here. We mostly use this (80%) within marinas and not generally going to the shore (20%).

The important thing to remember is that the high pressure floors need around 11 psi to make them functional. We found a great electric pump that supports this pressure. But there are not many around that do support the pressure level and they are a bit $$$$.

When we eventually move on down to the Caribbean we will sell our HP floor dink and replace it with a RIB. But by that time we will have a davit system of some kind. And we expect to make shore based landings about 80% of the time.
 
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