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Discussion Starter #1
Sorry in advance if this is covered elsewhere. I was not able to turn up anything in a quick search.

The Coast Guard instructions for placing the registration numbers are to apply to the interior hull structure...and clearly visible...no easily removed. Where is the most common place that the numbers are being applied?

Thanks in advance...
 

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I think inside a cockpit locker is a great location. It is technically the inside structure of the hull and, if painted on, is not easily removed. You could probably even put it on the underside of the locker lid.
A lot of people put fancy carved boards in the cabin but that has never appealed to me.
 

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I usually screw and glue a "fancy carved board" on a bulkhead at eye level in the cabin. It's common to put a second set of numbers on the inside of the hull somewhere that it doesn't show. If stolen, thieves may not find the hidden set.
 

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Screwed on plates are not what the CG had in mind when they say, "not easily removable". Most boats I have been on, the documentation number is routed into a structural beam or frame near the companionway or in the engine space. A cockpit locker lid (easily removable) may pass inspection, or it may not, depending on the mood of the inspector. Have the number routed into a board or fiberglass plate and fiberglass that onto a structural beam or frame out of sight in the engine space or under the companionway steps. This is for your safety, should the boat get stolen.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Makes good sense. I recently purchased the boat, so I need to find the previous numbers. They aren't in an obvious place, although I have not searched specifically for the numbers. I should remove them and then apply the new ones (according to CG requirements).

I was really confused about mounting registration numbers according to how the Coast Guard words this. It makes sense now. It took me a while to get that the Coast Guard initially observes the name of the boat and the port. If they board the boat, they want to be able to easily find the registration numbers.
 

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Makes good sense. I recently purchased the boat, so I need to find the previous numbers. They aren't in an obvious place, although I have not searched specifically for the numbers. I should remove them and then apply the new ones (according to CG requirements).

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The number doesn't change from one owner to the next. If the numbers are located in a place you (and the USCG) can live with, you may not have to move them.
 

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Be certain you're talking about the right "CG numbers" here. There is a HIN (Hull Identification Number) which must be fixed to the hull, there also the documentation number and the state registration numbers.

If you put the state reg numbers on a plaque on the inside of your boat they won't be impressed. :)

MedSailor
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The number doesn't change from one owner to the next. If the numbers are located in a place you (and the USCG) can live with, you may not have to move them.
Wow, that is really good news. I'll find the numbers. Surely, they are adequate. Best I can tell, the previous owners were thorough and pretty meticulous with the boat.

Thanks for all the replies.
 

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Your CG documentation hull number ("Official Number")? Typically carved into the keel timber, in the old days.

Nowadays glassed into/onto the hull itself. I don't think "glue and screw" is going to pass muster. Usually the manufacturer has already done this for you, if the first owner documented the boat, that is.
 

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"The screws are just to hold it 'til the glue dries" as my woodshop teacher was found of saying.
FWIW Both real coasties (off the cutter Haddock) and auxiliaries signed off on this method, you'd tear the bulkhead apart before you could remove the plaque.
 
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