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Discussion Starter #1
I finally learned to scuba dive a little while back while on my first boat and in the BVI and have yearned for a dive compressor aboard in order to be free of the shackles of dive operators since then. Well, on the new Zanshin I finally opted to get a Bauer Junior II dive compressor and got it running a little while back and have been diving frequently since then. I love the freedom of being able to refill the 2 tanks I have while running the genset to recharge the batteries and be able to dive when and where I would like without having to join a dive group led by a dive shop.
I also ended up getting an underwater housing for my camera and, in the past two weeks, have seen things and taken pictures as I never was able to before.

For those interestd, click on the thumbnail to get to my site's calendar, and each date with a thumbail of an underwater image contains the pictures for that site and that day.

 

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Glad you're enjoying the compressor. For some reason, most I've known have ultimately taken them back out. Maybe they got to dive so much, it became boring!

I went to your web page and saw you bought Zanshin in Annapolis from Bay Yacht Agency. I had a very bad experience with them years back (not this boat), as I know many have. Lying used car salesman come to mind. They do use a great guy to commission systems, but he is actually independent. A good friend uses him. How did you end up there?
 

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Nicely done! Great pictures! When(hopefully when) I get a bigger boat a dive compressor is a must for me.

Brad
s/v KIVALO
 

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Discussion Starter #6
...Bay Yacht Agency...They do use a great guy to commission systems, but he is actually independent... A good friend uses him. How did you end up there?
I had a good experience with Bay Yacht Agency, but it is a new vs. an "experienced" boat which makes things a bit different. The commissioning is done and coordinated by Mark Sims, who did a great job and is also very supportive in the warranty process for those items which go *poof* during the first couple of months.
 

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I had a good experience with Bay Yacht Agency, but it is a new vs. an "experienced" boat which makes things a bit different. The commissioning is done and coordinated by Mark Sims, who did a great job and is also very supportive in the warranty process for those items which go *poof* during the first couple of months.
Glad it went well for you. My bad experience was with a new boat order, which I ultimately cancelled due to all the deception, errors, misinformation and high sales pressure.
 

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I switched from scuba to a brownies hookah, with two 70 ft hoses. Instead of using the float ring, I just tow it in my dingy. Love it. Very cheap to run and I have dove to 70 ft with it. I could go to 100 with the hoses hooked together.
No more hydros and visuals, which were happening too frequently and costing ever more.
Many cruisers I know have given up scuba for hookahs.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hello Brent, while the hookah does seem to replace scuba for some, I'm not too sure I'd like to trust it when I'm at 70 feet and have been down there long enough to need a 3 minute stop at 15 feet when the batteries fail or some other mechanical problem arises; at least with a tank the air is with you and need to be forced down to me. But that is a matter of preference and I can live with doing a tank test every 2 years. The only system that I've seen so far was quite bulky, perhaps there are smaller ones out there?
Be that as it may, the ability to dive at will is certainly a great added value to any boating trip.
 

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Hello Brent, while the hookah does seem to replace scuba for some, I'm not too sure I'd like to trust it when I'm at 70 feet and have been down there long enough to need a 3 minute stop at 15 feet when the batteries fail or some other mechanical problem arises; at least with a tank the air is with you and need to be forced down to me. But that is a matter of preference and I can live with doing a tank test every 2 years. The only system that I've seen so far was quite bulky, perhaps there are smaller ones out there?
Be that as it may, the ability to dive at will is certainly a great added value to any boating trip.
Those hookah systems look very appealing to me - if I was long distance cruising I'd definitely take one, for underwater maintenance if nothing else. Think of the time & money you'd save if you could just scrub your bottom regularly instead of hauling & painting. No gearing up, storing & filling tanks, the aforementioned tank tests, expensive oil-less compressor etc. etc. Unless you were intent on serious diving, it seems to me a hookah would serve very well.

Agree with Zanshin about diving deep with one - I'd stay above 50'. Going to decompression depths sounds too much like old style hard hat diving, the mere concept of which always gave me the creeps and claustrophobia. It also killed a LOT of divers.
 

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No more hydros and visuals, which were happening too frequently and costing ever more.
It's been 36 years since I qualified - can you elucidate that code?
 

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.....when I'm at 70 feet and have been down there long enough to need a 3 minute stop at 15 feet.....
That's a long time at 70 ft. Over 45 mins conservatively, even longer if using a dive comuter. Most (not all) could not get a standard tank to last that long at that depth. Although, a 3 min hang means you didn't blow it by much. Not worth the few extra mins below.

On the other hand, you may mean a standard precautionary decomp stop. If one wants to use a hookah, they could always hang a bailout bottle at 15 ft on their down line, in the event of a failure.
 

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That's a long time at 70 ft. Over 45 mins conservatively, even longer if using a dive comuter. Most (not all) could not get a standard tank to last that long at that depth. Although, a 3 min hang means you didn't blow it by much. Not worth the few extra mins below.

On the other hand, you may mean a standard precautionary decomp stop. If one wants to use a hookah, they could always hang a bailout bottle at 15 ft on their down line, in the event of a failure.
Ok I give up what's a hookah? I did a google search and found a million hits but most all were this???

 

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Be aware oillesss compressors can overheat and pump poisonous gasses into the tank. There are no sensor or safety systems available to stop filling a tank if the compressed air is contaminated.

Larger oil lubricated compressors produce hydrocarbons which can be detected and either filtered or the system turns the compressor off.

Maintenance on compressors filling breathing air into tanks is essential to safety.
 

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The biggest consideration for compressed air is the quality of the intake. If you have to run the genset to run the compressor, you need to be very careful that the genset exhaust isn't being blown over the compressor intake. Blood cells love carbon monoxide, something like 8-1 over oxygen, leaving no room to carry O2. Breath it under pressure and you're toast. A filter isn't good enough for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Genset running at anchor, intake at front of boat separated by 50 feet - regardless of wind direction the input air is clean, unless one anchors directly upwind of a pollutant.
 

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Think of the time & money you'd save if you could just scrub your bottom regularly instead of hauling & painting.
Regular hull cleaning does not replace anti fouling paint. You still need new paint every 2-3 years. Hull cleaning is simply a normal part of maintaining that paint.

Agree with Zanshin about diving deep with one - I'd stay above 50'. Going to decompression depths sounds too much like old style hard hat diving, the mere concept of which always gave me the creeps and claustrophobia. It also killed a LOT of divers.
Decompression depths begin at 33', not 50'.
 
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