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Over Hill Sailing Club
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had a number of instances like cutting line off the prop, or tightening set screws in my cutlass, etc. that have required going under with knife or wrench. Buoyancy of a wet suit and planning the procedure according to how long I can hold my breath makes it not much fun. I'm seriously considering taking a dive cert. class this winter and getting some simple scuba gear. While I hate to have to find space for more stuff, having scuba gear seems like it might be a worthwhile idea. Do any of you carry scuba equip. and have you found it worth doing?
 

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When I was running a powerboat, I carried dive gear aboard all the time. Unfortunately, it didn't get used as much as I would have liked. I was a diver in the Navy, and at one time a NAUI certified instructor for a local dive shop.

If I were in the Florida Keys, I would definitely have dive gear aboard. I cannot think of another location in the US that has better diving conditions that is found in the Dry Tortugas, Marquesses Keys, Sand Shoal Key, and a few others in the lower keys area.

Good luck,

Gary :cool:
 

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I cannot think of another location in the US that has better diving conditions that is found in the Dry Tortugas, Marquesses Keys, Sand Shoal Key, and a few others in the lower keys area.:
I found diving the north Fla springs and the Cenotes of Mexico possibly better..but then again I'm a technical diver with special training and equipment...

But to answer the OP I carry OC dive gear on our sailboat..but mostly free dive to clean prop and bottom
 

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2005 Gemini 105Mc
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Certified Diver here. We carried our dive gear on our last trip to the keys but did not find the opportunity to use it.

I don't have any experience with this product, but am considering it because carrying 4 dive tanks adds considerable weight:

Hookah Diving, Diving Systems | Florida

It is a much more economical solution to other hookah devices.

Again, I haven't tried one and don't have experience with it. However, I did physically see the unit locally.

Just a suggestion, may be a good solution for brief, close dives to the boat.
 

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I have a 120 volt Hookah system that I run off the Honda 2000 generator when needed. Waters here are not great for diving but, for cleaning the bottom or prop or recovering something dropped over the side it works great. Use to carry a dive tank/hookah setup but, as another has said it was a lot of extra weight and refill of tanks could be a PITA. Much prefer the electric hookah setup for my needs.
 

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old guy :)
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I too am a certified diver. I carry a 40, BC, regs, - the full stuff. Have done so for the last 15 summers. Never used it even once.

BUT _ I have on numerous occasions donned the wet suit, fins, mask, snorkel and weights and spent time clearing lobster float lines from the prop.

And I will continue to carry the stuff - just in case.

For what it's worth: Gear on board

Rik
 

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I was SCUBA certified back in 1968. Been a diver for quite some time now. When we departed in 2004 we took a Hookah system and LOVE it! It works off 12 volts. When diving the boat, I hook to the house batteries.

We did NOT get the inflatable ring type, ours is in sort of a tool box and supplies 2 divers to about 20 +/- Ft. We also took 2 30 Ah AGM battries with us and used it from our dink.

The full system takes us less space aboard than 1 ONE set of SCUBA gear! we cruise a 27 Ft boat and that is important! ;)



Greg
 

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I have found having a tank and BC very worthwhile for emergency uses. The scuba gear is bulky, but can be stowed at the bottom of the least convenient spot. I always have snorkel gear handy.

You should definitely get SCUBA-certified. It is a great sport. I have done bareboat charters that featured dives almost every day. The gear was kept handy and they are great trips, but now I prefer the ease of snorkeling. So one tank if the boat is ours, none if it is a charter.
 

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I would recommend a hookah. No certification needed and no tanks to worry about where and when to fill.

You can make your own hookah from parts or buy a complete unit. When I looked into building one all the suppliers were oriented to dredging gold.
Affordable Hookah Systems

They make ac, dc, and gas powered units. Some of the compressors are only rated to 15 feet. If you have to run the unit from inside the boat make sure you have enough hose to reach any location you may need to access in an emergency and enough pressure to compensate for any pressure drop in a longer hose.

Before you spend any money do your research and then think about it a few days.
 

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I'm a diver, haven't carried gear on a sailboat but don't see why not if you have the space and capacity.

For emergency shallow-draft work you likely wouldn't need a full 80 cu ft. tank, which is bulky and heavy, use a 30 cf "pony" as suggested earlier, it should easily last a half-hour which should be plenty. In cold water, a wetsuit, in warm water you could get by without it for a few minutes anyway. And you need someone else as a "dive tender" to keep an eye on you. Also a ladder or a low dinghy to get into to reboard, you can "cheat" on that weight if necessary by doffing your buoyancy jacket and tank in the water to haul up with a line (making SURE you tied off and removed your weight belt first ;-)

If you love diving and are at a good site (the Keys for example) then you could go rent an 80 (file that under "dinghy needed").

Recently I lost my good prescription glasses overboard in the marina slip. Freediving didn't work, but my regular rig with the pony tank the next day, did work. So your gear can really pay for itself now and then. Safety first on all this, scuba is safe if you follow the rules, and definitely not safe if you don't....
 

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Mermaid Hunter
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I'm certified through PADI with some technical diving training from the USN.

I carry one 80 and full kit (including two wet suits). I use it a few times a year to clean the bottom and the prop.

I also built a hose to use the tank air as a source of compressed air around the boat.

I would recommend a hookah. No certification needed and no tanks to worry about where and when to fill.
Required or not, basic SCUBA certification is well advised diving with any source of air.
 

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2005 Gemini 105Mc
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I agree on the 12 volt hooka rigs available today. Ours is called a deck snorkel. All together they cost less, take up less space, don't chip the glass or ding your wood and are much safer than scuba.
Most islands in the Eastern Caribbean no longer allow independent scuba diving anyway, so it's just a lot of expensive gear you don't need aboard, because you can rent it economically if you want to sport dive. Air fills can be a problem in some places, both availability and quality.
Ours is about 4 years old and has paid for itself many times over in bottom cleaning and underwater work, never mind the fun of chucking it in the dink with a battery and going out to play.
 
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Over Hill Sailing Club
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for all the tips. The hookah idea seems good for emergency repairs and bottom cleaning. I don't really have a great desire to go diving as another sport so the hookah seems to be the best solution.
 

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2005 Gemini 105Mc
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Probably good for about 3 mins..dependent on depth,stress, individual SAC/RMV rate
Man, now you've done it.......

Am going to now have to find a calculator.......

Let's see here, 3000psi, 3 cu ft., 5'-6' depth........:D

I'll be back, but don't hold your breath.........:laugher
 

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...Most islands in the Eastern Caribbean no longer allow independent scuba diving anyway, so it's just a lot of expensive gear you don't need aboard...
Hi Capta,

I don't want to take this thread off topic, but could you expand on the above statement? Are you referring to prohibitions against anchoring in good dive locations to protect reefs or do the authorities on these islands flat out not want you to jump off your own boat with your own gear?
 
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