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There is a valve and a spring on the air inlet with a lever that operates the valve when you push on the purge button. When you breathe in the diaphragm pushes on the lever and opens the valve. Some people say you can replace the spring with a softer spring or cut the spring down but the easiest thing to do is remove the valve completely. It then becomes a free flow air delivery. I did this with this cheap Chinese octopus regulator. It is perfectly safe if you follow the three rules mentioned. It also pays to attach the hookah air line to a belt or harness with the regulator hose going over your shoulder so the hose doesn't pull on the regulator.
 

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Breathing on a free-flowing 2nd stage is no fun. For less than $100 you can buy a regulator designed to work in a hookah. But if saving a couple of bucks is that important to you... :rolleyes:
 

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Yeah, I don't think I want bubbles roiling up around my face constantly. I would rather just spend the money to buy a regulator made for this.
 

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As I said, you can change the spring in a 2nd stage to lower the psi, but the hookah I use is 160 LPM and about 17.5 psi. so I don't want to restrict the flow. When you breathe normally, without holding your breath, you breathe continuously. With the free flow regulator air is coming down the hose at 160 lpm. You breath in and the exhaust valve closes and you fill your lungs. Less than a second later you breathe out and your exhaled breath with the fresh air is exhaled. then you start the process again. Most of the bubbles occur when you exhale, unless you hold your breath, which you shouldn't. I don't feel that restricting the air flow and putting a strain on the little compressor to stop the bubbles for less than a second is worth the extra cost. If you don't like the bubbles, on my regulator the exhaust valve exits in to a box shape that sits under the regulator in front of your chin with openings at each end, so it would be easy to silicon in two 3 inch tubes to divert the exhaust to the side of your face.
 

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I'm almost afraid to post here...lol

I'm cert. and have 2 hookah systems, one store bought expensive one, and 1 diy unit.

I metal detect and stay down for quite a while. would have to check my logs but I know it's over 500 hours on hookah alone.

I won't post the ebay link but look for the 12v oil-less compressor with 2 tanks the blue one, about 200 bucks has a built in regulator. it builds pressure then shuts off. some say that saves battery...
get breathing air hose, I have a couple hundred feet of it I use.
get a few second stages, and a little plumbing hardware to mate the hose to the regulator. think pressure washer...
I have used sla's and deep cycle batteries it depends on how far I have to haul this crap to get to where I'm going to dive.

To tell you the truth sometimes it's easier to just dive on the bottle.... But time limited....

I know there's a hot spot I dive at quite regular I load up everything so I can stay down most of the day... under 5' of water.... I take a break every 2 or 3 hours.... but I might be down for 8-10 that day.

So it can be done safely... But if you have no idea of how this stuff works spend the coin for a proven system. I know it's been said before but get cert. A few hundred dollars is pretty cheap insurance.

Bob
 

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Ok. I am new to this community chat thing. This is what I am getting out of this discussion. Nobody (with an exception or two) has personal knowledge about the topic. The topic seems to be can a hookah dive system be engineered from a commercially available compressor? Yes you know the dangers of a scuba novice jumping in the water with compressed air from any source is a potential path to a very dangerous situation. Great your money for a dive class was well spent. Now who can get back to basics. A decent hookah gig all color coordinated, cute little diver down stickers and a punchy logo that has the word "diver" in it is going to cost $800 on the cheap end. Okay let's start with the proper regulator and hose. WHAT does a "experienced" diver need from there to make a better rig for much less money ($200-500 without the paint job and stickers)???

Who here wouldn't really like to know?
 

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Nobody (with an exception or two) has personal knowledge about the topic.
There are several exceptions, with personal experience, and they have posted quite useful information. They are typically then told that they are crazy, by people who do NOT have personal experience. Up to you to decide who to believe.

WHAT does a "experienced" diver need from there to make a better rig for much less money ($200-500 without the paint job and stickers)??? Who here wouldn't really like to know?
I think a number here already know.

You need an oil-free compressor that can deliver adequate air-flow. What "adequate" means, and whether it is run by 12 volts, 110 volts, or a gas engine depends on your specific requirements. You need air hose that is rated specifically for breathing. You need a regulator second stage. Depending on your compressor it may, or may not, have to be able to work with less air pressure than a "normal" second stage. You probably should have a filter on your air hose; this may not be absolutely REQUIRED, but there is no doubt that it is a good idea and well worth the money.

That's it. Not really all that complicated. If you buy cheap stuff you can probably do it for less than $500. That cheap stuff may not last very long in a marine environment. If you want quality gear that will last then you may have to go over $500. Still, either way, it is not all that complicated. Just some people like to make it SEEM much more complicated.
 

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HI guys I am another aussie that used the Boyu acq910 uses a 12v deep cycle battery- runs for ages
For info on setups google" Keene Intro to Hooka"
You need an oil free compressor
The Boyu is high flow low pressure I use 2 compressorsb (160 l/min each- at the surface)
My air reservoir is a failed scuba tank- yes I know but I am assuming it is unlikely to fail at 18psi- and if it does it will leak not explode at 18 psi remember it was designed- and could probably still take 2000 psi
Use a 5 micron filter
Certified air breathing hose- you can get it on Ebay
I think there are 2 sizes- I use the larger size as i figure it will decrease the resistance
ALSO NEED A CHECK VALVE!!!!!
cheapo Chinese reg and adjusted the intake - basically it is free flowing - can live with that
Don't use a BCD
One diver to 25- 30 feet, 2 divers 10-15 feet
We also have a commercial Hookah max petrol unit
Have dive ticket- and yes all the precaution as if it were scuba- IT IS compressed air
On the DIY really only shallow 10 -15 feet for two of us. Bottom times not a prob - the battery starts to slow and up you go BUT go up slow!!!
With the deeper dives we carry each a bail out with an occy, like a catalina s19 and BCD
Make sure your quick release couplings cannot undo, make sure your air at intake point not contaminated with petrol( gas) fumes or exhaust fumes etc
Graham
 

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Fstbttms: 2013 was so long ago that I was going to send you a PM but seeing as how there is a 15 post requirement to participate I was bound to comment on this old post...

I'm building a hookah and was curious if you'd be up for a discussion, could you PM me since I'm un-allowed
Thanks
 

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The output breathing line filter is critical on the oil-less compressors since dust from the teflon piston rings wearing will get into the air stream but be aware that the cheaper ones will also get hot and off-gas the teflon, etc in the piston rings which a particulate filter will not be able to trap. Clean "breathing rated hose" is critical too and should not have ever been used on an unfiltered compressor of any kind nor should it have been left opened ended so dust and other contaminants could have gotten into it.

I speak from the viewpoint of the tool crib manager and head of maintenance of several woodworking and upholstery factories who has had to deal with the issues related to oil-less compressors and oil-free air tools that used non-metallic piston rings to run oil-less.

The dust from the non-metallic piston rings wearing would leave black stains on the fabrics and the exhaust would also include metallic dust from the cylinder in the compressor too which would also contribute to accelerating wear on any tools used on those air lines. Putting spray painting filters on the tool end of the hoses would only prevent the particles from going through but not the fumes as the piston rings off-gassed or smoke as they got hot.

Do your research on how to deliver clean, safe air that poses no immediate or long term health risks to the diver. Any carcinogen introduced into the divers air stream will not be expelled as rapidly from the lungs as during normal breathing so there is a potential for greater risk when an consumer grade air-less compressor is used to supply breathing air. Even some pollen's that get past your air filter can pose a greater risk of an allergy or asthma attack which Duke University has sited as the cause of some diving incidents such as the one reported in the September 2002 issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology regarding a diver in Naples Italy changing air tank suppliers to one who did not have adequate filtration on their system which resulted in pollen from local plants surrounding the dive shop being broken up into smaller particles and introduced into all the tanks they filled. The attack triggered by the pollen created a life threatening situation.

The DIYer will need to vet this all out to ensure their system passes the same rigors that the commercial systems do before being put into use and unlike that Dive Shop in Naples be sure to maintain the system and the filters so as to not present a risk.

We are looking into the same at the Sailing Center for maintaining some of our larger vessels that are less convenient to pull from the water for hull maintenance. We need it to be idiot proof enough for use around volunteers and such who may not have a good track record for following instructions and have a habit of modifying equipment without asking first because of some personal reason that they feel is more critical than observing Best Practice or Established Safety Guidelines.
 

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Bringing an old thread back from the dead.

I have a few thousand dives on traditional Scuba and just a few on hookah. PADI Certified Advanced.

Here is what I am considering for my DIY rig to be used in marinas.

Thomson 1207PK80 compressor. Overkill?

Jsink Airline hose. 75 feet. Longer?

XS Scuba Hookah Second Stage Regulator. 110-140psi model??? The compressor is rated 125psi. Should I get the 80-110psi instead? This is my biggest question. Anyone who has used this compressor please chime in!!!

What am I missing or forgetting?




 

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Bringing an old thread back from the dead.

I have a few thousand dives on traditional Scuba and just a few on hookah. PADI Certified Advanced.

Here is what I am considering for my DIY rig to be used in marinas.

Thomson 1207PK80 compressor. Overkill?

Jsink Airline hose. 75 feet. Longer?

XS Scuba Hookah Second Stage Regulator. 110-140psi model??? The compressor is rated 125psi. Should I get the 80-110psi instead? This is my biggest question. Anyone who has used this compressor please chime in!!!

What am I missing or forgetting?




Assuming your Air Line air hose includes an inline filter, I think you've covered it pretty well. Use the 80-110 psi 2nd stage.
 

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I am in the process of getting all the ideas of what a safe reliable DIY hookah system would look like. At the same time I just signed up for scuba certification. Just passed the online certification and waiting for the weather to warm up a bit and this virus pandemic to abate and then finish my practical certification in water.
 

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The Thomas 2685PE40 has almost the same specs and less than half the cost. Applications include Air Vending>Mobile Dental Stations>Pond Aeration>Telephone Cable Drying>Wave Guide Pressurization>Wind Turbine Gear Box Cooling
 
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