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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone seen a tutorial for DIY jacklines? Which buckles to use and where to get them? And, what kinds of stitches?


For jacklines, this material seems awesome: Mantra MKIII
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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You don't need buckles at all. Our jacklines are Wichard polyester webbing with a loop sewn in one end. We go from cleat to cleat and just tie in on like rope (have lots of extra it will slip without multiple turns and hitches.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
are you aware of a DIY guide. am trying to figure out what is the best way to design it before i order the webbing.
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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Something like that. We bought our jacklines with the loop sewn in and it was beautifully done. You could DIY but make sure the thread is really good quality because there are both sun and wetness issues.
 

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You don't need buckles at all. Our jacklines are Wichard polyester webbing with a loop sewn in one end. We go from cleat to cleat and just tie in on like rope (have lots of extra it will slip without multiple turns and hitches.
Can you clarify where you are attaching the end without the loop?
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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I just tie off on a aft cleat. I have lots of cleats so i can use one forward and one aft on each side just for the jacklines. I have about 8 extra feet of webbing. I have used a trucker's hitch to get it really tight but in recent years I just pull it as tight as possible before tying it off as you would a halyard with more wraps and hitches since the material is much more slippery than most ropes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Is it better to run two jacklines, one on either side of the boat, from bow to transom? Or, is it better to have run through the center? Is there a way to ensure that one stays on the boat at all times if tied in?

Also, what is the normal length for the tether? Is it made from the same material? With a wichard loop at the end?

Am assuming that one uses a locking carabiner attached to a harness to secure the other end.
 

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We rigged DIY jacklines by re-purposing the wire from our old jib halyards when we went to all-fiber. We ran them them from a padeye at the bow, inside the shrouds, and aft to the car that our running backstays attach to, port & starboard. We added shackles (moused) at the ends. After more than a dozen years, this season we splurged and got a set of the Wichard webbing ones. Attaching them to a car on the toerail (aft) enables us to move the car so they reach, but aren't too tight.
 

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I do not tie/sew a loop in either end of the lines I have. But the side closest to the cockpit I tie what I believe to be a "water knot" in and around a metal loop. This knot is as strong as sewn loops. The other end is attached to a cleat at the bow.

I will admit, not sure if it meets the ISAF stds at noted in the SA thread. But for me here in the salish sea, where it is nice to have the knowledge if I or crew does loose footing, they will not go far overboard if at all.

The webbing is typical 1" material found at REI in the climbing section. Material I have hung off of rock cliffs, ice crevass's etc. A lot of the sailing fall protection material comes from the climbing side of things. I do a every 2 season replacement of this webbing. Its only about $1 a foot. so pretty cheep on that end of things. May not be as UV/IR resistant as some jacklines at two to three times the cost......

If I was going offshore.......would probably have a slightly different setup, maybe with heavier material that I know meets the ISAF minimums, but for stronger wind, heavier sea days here in puget sound, what I have works.

I do not see any place that has a "jacklines need to be put here" style of rule. Only a general put them so you can be tied in anywhere. It may mean a couple or three lines per side from front to rear, and you will need a harness with 2 clip on attachments, so when going from on to the other, you are not unclipping yourself per say.

Marty
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Think I will set up a single jack line from a metal hook aft (Like JackB's picture above). Then I can pass the line through another hook mid-ship and to a hook at the front of the forestay. What is that hook called, Jackb?

This arrangement will allow me to go up port side or starboard. And, if the tether is 5 feet on an 8 foot beam, it should be long enough that I can walk about standing up, and short enough that there is no chance of getting off the boat in heavy weather.

TETHER: Is the tether made of the same webbing and stitched in a similar way. I imagine it hooks in a locking carabiner attached to a harness.
 

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plenty of pics and thoughts over on the tether thread
 
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