SailNet Community banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

· Over Hill Sailing Club
Joined
·
3,689 Posts
Reaction score
934
Of course, spending $1000+ will get you excellent sailing clothes but the main point is to keep from getting wet and cold. You don't need sailing-specific clothes to do this. You also don't need Goretex or the like. IMO, which I have stated here before, "breathable" fabrics work only when the outside ambient humidity is far less than the humid interior. It was developed with mountain climbing/hiking in mind where dry air is common. This is often not the case on a boat, where high humidity is the norm. When working up a sweat in a humid situation, you'll get wet with any fabric, solid or breathable. The breathable fabrics feel softer on the outside than rubberized and are more comfortable to wear. But, a good commercial fisherman's rainsuit, Grunden's or Helly and boots with ski socks will keep you warm if you have the right layers underneath. The warm-when-wet fleece layers underneath make all the difference. It doesn't have to be labeled "Sailing" gear to work. Having the right layers and combinations is really what it's all about for any sport. Conditions change rapidly. I sometimes wind up with a huge pile of different layers that have been used along the way. The prices on some of the sailing jackets are really humorous. Spend a pile to depend on one jacket and then it gets too hot, what to do then? Also don't discount neoprene, kayak-type clothing or even drysuit apparel if you have access to it. A drysuit top will keep ALL the water out of the clothing underneath but they're quite uncomfortable to wear for long periods.
 

· Over Hill Sailing Club
Joined
·
3,689 Posts
Reaction score
934
Goretex surely is more comfortable than a rubber/poly coated jacket. Just the better movement from something that feels like cloth makes it much more comfortable. I have a number of Goretex garments, none of which were designed specifically for sailing but I find that, having insulation, they are very often too warm. The Gore rain shell I have soaks through after a while so I don't even take it aboard anymore. That's another thing about these fabrics, they require special maintenance. When it's really wet and raining hard I almost always go to the old, green Helly Hansen jacket and bibs left over from my commercial fishing days with the right amount of layers underneath. For the OP, I guess my point is that having adequate combinations is really the essential element in keeping from getting cold. And, remember the hiking adage, "COTTON KILLS." I have a couple of microfleece undershirts which are absolutely the best 1st layer I've ever tried. They are useful for a large range of temperatures and IMO are much better than any standard hi-tech long underwear (I've tried them all). They're also inexpensive. That first layer is really important.
 

· Over Hill Sailing Club
Joined
·
3,689 Posts
Reaction score
934
smurph, GoreTex needs next to no maintenance.
"The Gore rain shell I have soaks through after a while so I don't even take it aboard anymore. "

Let me put it this way: CALL GORE.

They will ask you to mail the shell to them, so they can inspect it. (Marmot and other companies will treat you equally well, by the way.) Assuming the GoreTex has failed, as it eventually always will, Gore will confirm that, and then they will ask you to pick a similar new garment, from ANY vendor. And they'll ship it to you at no charge.

Really, can it get any better than that?

CALL GORE. They've even got a toll-free number. They charge a premium price for their product, but they back it up with absolutely magnificent customer service.
Although I can't believe they'd replace a 30 year-old shell, will give it a try. Thanks for that info.
 

Attachments

· Over Hill Sailing Club
Joined
·
3,689 Posts
Reaction score
934
No, it doesn't have to be labeled "sailing" gear, but I've learned that buying quality "kayaking" foul weather clothing costs virtually the same as buying quality "sailing" foul weather clothing.

It's a false economy...
Yes, any of the niche markets charge a premium. Just saying that if the OP is looking for gear without spending a pile of money, it might be worth looking through all the different choices instead of just sailing gear. More opportunities to find a sale on some good gear.
 

· Over Hill Sailing Club
Joined
·
3,689 Posts
Reaction score
934
One piece of kayak gear I keep in my ditch bag is a Kokotat dry top. It was ghastly expensive years ago but will keep out water while inverted in a w/w kayak. Now that's a real test of watertightness! I also keep a full 1/4" wetsuit in the ditch bag. Wetsuits come in really handy even in "warmer" water for cleaning the hull, etc. The jacket I use for cold weather is a Goretex LLB Maine Warden's jacket. It is designed for very cold/wet weather. Have been glad to have it many times, even when it's in the 40s or so.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top