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We just finished our first season as boat owners. The PO told us that he never covered the boat and for a 1975 it's in great shape, so we similarly haven't covered it (it's currently on poppets). We did take the wood off per his suggestion so we could touch it up over the winter.

Now that the first snowfall of the season is expected today, I was wondering if we should be clearing the snow off of it? If so, about how much snow would warrant the one hour drive down to the marina?

Thanks.
 

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Tartan 37
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Its on the hard? I had to look up the word poppets ;)

Covered or not you will want to keep the scuppers clear so when the snow/ice melts it has someplace to go instead of overflowing into the cabin. Otherwise, unless there's excessive snow/ice, not much to be concerned about except the added weight. If in the water, if the weight of the snow puts thru hulls below the waterline that could be cause for concern, or open boats. Saw a beautiful catboat sink in our old marina a few years ago after snowmageddon because it was not covered.
 

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The snow in itself is harmless. However, when it melts, and freezes again, it is not so fun. To remove a frozen ice block may be a challenge.

Small amounts can be neglected. If water (melted snow) can go away in drains etc, then it probably not anything to worry about. Visit now and then is always good, at least once a month.

I cover my boat - do not want rain, snow and dirt to attack to much. Many are not, or cover only the cockpit. Each to their own ....

poppets? Hm, I have more to learn

/J
 

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Old soul
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We always cover our boats up here, although not everyone does. And we usually get lots of snow.

Personally, I would remove the snow if at all possible. As Jaramaz says, it's not so much the snow, but the freeze-thaw rotation that will inevitably start to happen. This will lead to water intrusion into the deck (assuming it is a cored deck). In fact, if this boat has been left exposed through winters since 1975 I'd be shocked if there is no water intrusion into the the deck. In that case, it's even more important to stop the process.

The other issues are scuppers freezing up, leading to possible cracking. Snow in any volume is quite heavy. You want to make sure your stands are properly supporting the boat, and your keel can take the extra weight (usually not a problem).

Much better to cover, I would say.
 

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Do you use the topping lift and boom to get the tractor on deck to clear the snow, or do you rig the spinnaker pole with a tackle?
LOL.
Perhaps a very, very long ramp (and a running start...).
 

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No Deere's here, only a bobcats! and a mini trackhoe to go with it!



I do not worry too much about snow either!



altho at times, with snow you do get some suspect folks trying to sail ones boat!




Marty
 

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Only if the snow is really deep/heavy.

7-8 inches of snow = 1 inch of water. Every 12 sq ft of that = a cubic foot which is 62.8 pounds.

Rule of thumb is deck space can equal .76 of beam x length, so a 38 foot (i.e. mine :) ) would be 12.5 x 38 x .76 or 361 sq feet.
2 feet of snow = 3 inches of water per sq foot and every 4 sq ft of deck would have 62.8 pounds on it
Roughly - 5667 pounds of snow on my deck. Sometimes math and reality don't work out, but you get the idea.

BTW, that would sink my medium displacement cruiser about 4 inches if it was evenly distributed - in reality I'd be stern down a good bit.

I have seen snow (30 inches) sink a Gemini 105m.
 

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Chastened
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Ditto on the freeze/thaw cycle causing damage, and excessive weight.

Snow piling up in the cockpit could cause the hull to sag into the poppets. These may or may not pop back out once the snow is gone, and the boat is in the water.

If the snow isn't super wet and sloppy, an ordinary leaf blower could clear most of the boat, then use a plastic dust pan or a plastic shovel to carefully clear out the cockpit without scratching the hell out of the gelcoat.
 

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Ditto on the freeze/thaw cycle causing damage, and excessive weight.

Snow piling up in the cockpit could cause the hull to sag into the poppets. These may or may not pop back out once the snow is gone, and the boat is in the water.

If the snow isn't super wet and sloppy, an ordinary leaf blower could clear most of the boat, then use a plastic dust pan or a plastic shovel to carefully clear out the cockpit without scratching the hell out of the gelcoat.
I use a silicone rubber chopping board from the boats galley. Stangely effective.
 

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We just finished our first season as boat owners. The PO told us that he never covered the boat and for a 1975 it's in great shape, so we similarly haven't covered it (it's currently on poppets). We did take the wood off per his suggestion so we could touch it up over the winter.

Now that the first snowfall of the season is expected today, I was wondering if we should be clearing the snow off of it? If so, about how much snow would warrant the one hour drive down to the marina?

Thanks.
Welcome to the Bristol ownership! 44 years and my Bristol has never been covered, never leaked for ices or snow and I have never cleared the snow off. I am in RI, close to you. We had some deep snow of us last winter, Nemo was one storm. Last spring I still had a chunk of loose ice on the shade side in late April. The storm of 1978 with three feet of snow...

I know there will be many that will say to cover. Here is a recent thread on covering. http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gener...05167-what-best-way-tarp-sailboat-winter.html
 

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I place a plastic tarp over the boom and attach it to the toe rail. The snow slides off and onto the ground - no problems. The little bit of snow that accumulates on the foredeck is easily shoveled off with the aid of a plastic shovel - same goes for the little bit that blows into the cockpit. The plastic shovel doesn't bother the gelcoat at all.

Gary :cool:
 

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I try to cover the boat in the winter. Got a little caught-out this season b/c of schedule and early cold weather.

 

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Freedom isn't free
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The Deere is for those persistent rocks and those blasted trees.
All the toys get stored in the garage these days.
 

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I tend to visit/work-on the boat all winter long. I sweep the snow off when ever it accumulates which tends to take all the yard dirt with it. Doing that usually means that I only have to do a quick rinse before putting on the first spring coat of polymer.
I have an aversion to tarps after seeing the damage the snow and ice does on a poorly tarped, and abandoned for the winter, boat!
 

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Indoor storage for my Lady
 
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