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1979 C&C 30 Mk I - 2QM15
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Am I correct in assuming that if you're tying up to pilings, the cheaper Three-strand nylon dock lines will have a longer lifespan than the pricier Double-braid dock lines?
 

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I don't know about wear, but I use three strand because it is cheaper and I can splice it myself. I never did get the hang of splicing double braid.
 

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That is probably true, BUT, while I do not tie up to pilings, I still prefer to use double as it is easier to use, does not stiffen up as it gets older etc. Coils nicer on the dock when there is a loose end.

In the end, not sure there is really a right or wrong, more what works best for you, you prefer etc.

marty
 

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Telstar 28
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While three-strand lines can hockle, they are far more resistant to getting picked apart by wooden pilings. :) They're also less expensive, and easy to splice.
 

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Three strand is perfectly functional. Best to use on old piles. Braided is easier to coil but it clinks on any defect in a pile (like and hang nail on thermal underwear). You can buy a spool and splice it yourself. I've never seen any data to indicate that braided was stronger or more durable.
In addition, if you are into marlinspike artwork you can do more to recycle an old three strand than a braided line.
 

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Telstar 28
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Generally, braided lines are stronger than three-strand lines in the same diameter. These are the figures for three-strand nylon and double-braid nylon from NE Ropes.

Three Strand


Double Braid



Three strand is perfectly functional. Best to use on old piles. Braided is easier to coil but it clinks on any defect in a pile (like and hang nail on thermal underwear). You can buy a spool and splice it yourself. I've never seen any data to indicate that braided was stronger or more durable.
In addition, if you are into marlinspike artwork you can do more to recycle an old three strand than a braided line.
 

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Sea Slacker
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braided lines also stretch a LOT more (I never realized how much until I tried to use one to climb up - it stretched about double the length under my weight :) ).

Whether stretch is good depends on what you do with them.
 

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Or, behind door #3

You could also use 8-plait or 12-plait single braid. (12 seems more common these days)

New England Ropes makes nylon anchoring (or mooring) 12-plait single braid, called variously Mega Plait, or Mega Braid.

They also make a polyester version called "Regatta Polyester Single Braid"

This is the same construction to most of the high-tech spectra/vectran/dyneema/technora/etc. ropes which are also single braid construction, although some of them have a polyester braid outside for chafe/UV.

It is almost as easy to splice as 3-strand.....search for a Brummel Splice, and use a long, evenly tapered tail.

It runs out more freely than either double-braid or 3-strand; it just doesn't want to hockle.

I believe strength and stretch is somewhere between double-braid and 3-strand, but the differences between construction are tiny compared to the differences between nylon, polyester, and spectra....

I don't know, but I suspect it would snag worse than 3-strand on rough pilings.
 
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