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Of course, we have option of anchoring off, heaving-to, or otherwise delaying the docking.

Them, not so much.....


Related topic, for students I compare the main and jib to airplane wings, except our "lift" is forward, theirs is up. Which one is much, much safer to screw up?? You got it, welcome to sailing..
 

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I'll bet their butt cheeks are clenched tighter than ours. :D
 

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All pilots have learn how to do cross wind landings but...DAMN... Can you imagine trying that in a Cesna?
I had to practice crosswind landings a lot when I learned in a Cessna 150 about 40 years ago (good grief has it been that long).:)

edit: messing up a crosswind docking doesn't have nearly the frightful consequences of messing up an airplane landing.
 

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Actually I love those kind of days.

I fly a B757 across the Atlantic weekly and for the most part automation has taken the fun out of what we do. But every now and then you get a serious crosswind, a circle to land or a low visibility approach and you get to use the skills that have been decades in the making.
 

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My third flight lesson was like this. Cessna 150, and I was supposed to try landing for the first time. But the breeze freshened up as it tends to do at Holloman AFB in the spring. The instructor -- a righteously crusty old guy who'd flown Mustangs over Europe in WWII -- decided he'd better handle the crosswind approach. I agreed (then and now).

Instructor was awesome. Actually smacked me for two-handing the yoke. "One hand for the stick, one for the throttle, otherwise you're a f**king cargo pilot."
 

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Bill SV Rangatira
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Of course, we have option of anchoring off, heaving-to, or otherwise delaying the docking.

Them, not so much.....

Related topic, for students I compare the main and jib to airplane wings, except our "lift" is forward, theirs is up. Which one is much, much safer to screw up?? You got it, welcome to sailing..
don't cesnas come with sky hooks anymore?
 

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could always try a different runway, I believe an alternate is part of the flight plan.
An alternate airport is part of the flight plan. Some airports have alternate runways and the active is usually the most favorable. The more favorable runway for wind can be too short, though. Ultimately, a crosswind landing itself is not as big a deal as it may seem and would almost never require diverting.

However, extreme winds are usually the result of frontal or storm activity, which can be accompanied by wind shear. Now that's a snake in the grass.
 

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Crabbing the airplane on final approach, then rotating at last minute to flair for the landing is extremely hard on the landing gear.
I would always set up a slip into the crosswind with opposite rudder on final approach. The plane would line up perfectly with the centerline on the runway. Then the upwind wheel would touch down a second before the other, with less stress on the landing gear and tires.
A lot of these type of videos are from central Europe only!
I can't do a slip with the boat, so the effects of the crab approach into wind, has as much control of the boat, as the rudder does, and more, when docking. So I choose an approach direction that keeps the bow heading into wind for the longest time , and takes me the closest to the dock as possible, to deposit a crew member.
 

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Rafiki 37
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^^^ Oh what he said

It is similar in that you crab at an angle until the last second and then turn the rudder hard to straighten her out.

And then go for reverse thrust!
It's weird but I was never taught to use the crab method in a crosswind, always to use the sideslip method.

I guess it's different in the big passenger jets
 

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Crabbing the airplane on final approach, then rotating at last minute to flair for the landing is extremely hard on the landing gear.
I would always set up a slip into the crosswind with opposite rudder on final approach......
Good technique, but it depends on the airframe.

Some planes will unport a fuel pickup, if you slip for too long. Others have turbines hanging below the wing, making a wing low slip touchdown an issue. Finally, losing a motor on a multi-engine aircraft, while slow and in a slip at low altitude, is an adrenaline raising event.
 
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