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Actually your sailboat will tend to drift less sideways than a powerboat, and should generally be more easily controlled at low speeds due to the larger rudder. With a bow thruster there should be no great difficulty at all.

I'd just take her out somewhere where there's an open dock with little traffic and practice. You'll find with the thruster you can easily turn in your own length, and I'd expect that boat to behave quite well in reverse gear. The one thing possibly new to you after the twin screws will be prop walk, but again, with the thruster you should be fine.
 

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Once you get the hang of it, prop walk can be your friend. Our boat walks to port, so when docking to port I put the boat at a 20 degree angle to the dock, come in with just enough speed to still have good steerage, and back down to stop. The propwalk rotates me nicely parallel with the dock and we step off.
Docking to starboard, I'll put the boat into a bit of a rotation (stern toward the dock) at the last second and back down to stop both the boat and the rotation.

We've always had boats that backed up well, and in a new or unusual docking situation usually try to back in... better directional control (we have, anyway) and better brakes as a rule.
 
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