SailNet Community banner
1 - 20 of 93 Posts

·
One of None
Hunter 34
Joined
·
8,633 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
and talking about you and pointing and laughing! .. and when you pulled up you thought they weren't? So, why you are so worried about "them"? :D

FILL IN YOUR THOUGHTS HERE ----> -----------------------------------------------------------------:rolleyes:

After almost 2yrs. (my yacht club has bar room that has windows looking down on the docks) of that worry. I can honestly say it doesn't bother me anymore. (ok I lie a little! :p ) Now when I'm there and get caught up watching newbies struggle I kindly offer to help. But I'm also aware of the "I can do it and don't need your help" attitude some people have.

Watching power boats coming in "hot" is a major attraction to sailboaters. and power boaters love to watch sailboaters inch thier way in. I sometimes still get caught up in watching the show, then realize it's not nice and saunter off.

Having river experiance "lining" canoes up and down rapids I've actually adapted that way of handling my 30ftr by having the bow line long enough to reach the cockpit (not the prop) and tied to the lifeline with a slip knot. When I "jump" the stern line is in hand and with a quick tug after bow line is also. I don't jump until I'm sure the boat is still. If a person offers to help I make sure they get the bow line because some don't realize the current will quickly spin the boat if they get the stern line. My boat also has midship cleats but I dont use them much. Our docks have padding so the bumpers don't have to be deployed until after tying up.

I must say when I hear: "Hey Denise you handle that boat ok!" gives me a warm feeling inside. I let my militant feelings stay dormant now when it's a male person offering his "approval" Unless he says: "I was watching" :eek: Guess I'm finally getting mellowed out :D

ok so it's raining today and home!

fair winds

Denise
 
  • Like
Reactions: jerryrlitton

·
1975 Newport 28
1986 Hunter 31
Joined
·
602 Posts
I've always put "watching others docking" into the same category as watching golfers come in on the 18th green. Sometimes you admire, sometimes you laugh. But we all have to do it while others are watching.

There's a reason both marinas and golf courses have the bars overlooking where everybody comes in.
 

·
Wandering Aimlessly
Joined
·
22,036 Posts
I quit keeping track of my do-overs ... I ran out of fingers and toes to count on. While there is a certain amount of pride in bringing the boat in sharply, I quit worrying about the times when I don't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
Docking the boat can be horrifying for some people. I can't help but watch though.

I'm also aware of the "I can do it and don't need your help" attitude some people have.
I'm that way if I don't know the person. It's not that I don't appreciate the offer, it's just that I've learned the hard way that not everyone knows what they are doing. It's easier and safer for the boat if I do it myself. I don't have to watch the other guy.

The same goes for crew on the boat. If they don't have a feel for what they are doing, I would rather they relax in the cockpit. It took a couple times of having the crew throw the line off way before we were ready to go before it occurred to me that there needs to be a little bit of knowledge before someone assists with docking.

No hard feelings if I ever turn away help!
 

·
Telstar 28
Joined
·
992 Posts
There's one powerboat at my marina, when they come in...everyone around runs over to help... he's a disaster in the making... ;) When he doesn't have dockside assistance, he's managed to hit at least four other boats... over the course of the last month. We're just fortunate that he's on the outermost row of docks. :D No real damage yet... and we're hoping to keep it that way. He is getting better now though.
 

·
One of None
Hunter 34
Joined
·
8,633 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
what gets me

is listening to the "posturing" when on-lookers start saying things like: "oh he/she still doesn't know which way the current is running" or: "hahaha look at that darn near hit so and so's boat!" But yet they dont offer to help. this has been an iteresting thread I musts say!
thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,336 Posts
It's always worth watching others do something that requires some skill -- whether it's docking, reefing, gibing gently, or what have you. Snickering is for losers. When I watch porn, I don't laugh and say, "I could have done THAT better."
 

·
Re-Member
Joined
·
228 Posts
As much as I appreciate the thought when people come to help, if I have my full crew I'd much rather just have them stand by. My crew and I have docking down pretty pat and, with other people trying to help, it throws off the routine and causes more issues than it is worth. If I'm short-handed, I'll take help. However, I'll never throw them the bow line. Most of the time the unknown help will get the line attached to the mid-cleat. That way, they can't pull it in too tight and cause the stern to swing out from the dock!
 

·
Señor Member
Joined
·
4,858 Posts
Jason (NOLAsailing) and welshwind expressed my thoughts on the: "I can do it and don't need your help" attitude". Unless there's a gale blowing and I'm coming in single-handed, I usually prefer to not have any dockside assistance from strangers.

I know how my boat behaves in just about every condition, and plan my docking approach accordingly. So often some bystander who doesn't know my docking style, will see my 9 ton boat angling into the dock and actually run "to my rescue". He usually grabs the bow rail - and pushes it away, thinking I'm on a collision course.

This is part of my technique - since as I make my angled approach, I reverse the engine and the paddlewheel effect on my left handed prop will straighten out the bow and kick the stern in. I then gently nudge in and kiss the dock - not the case when the clueless dockhand inadvertently pushes me away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,647 Posts
However, I'll never throw them the bow line. Most of the time the unknown help will get the line attached to the mid-cleat. That way, they can't pull it in too tight and cause the stern to swing out from the dock!
Everybody always wants to pull the damn bow in.
Thats the skinny part of the boat, pull in the fat part.
I have to tell any newcomer trying to help.
Bow Out, Stern In.

It never works, they always grab the bow and pull as hard as they can.

I much prefer docking with just my wife and me on our slip.
The dock lines are already attached to the finger pier. I pull in, she grabs the spring with a boat hook, and I use prop walk to settle the stern.

Still get a little nervous when every anybody is watching, but everybody in our Marina is usually very helpful. We all help each other, especially on windy days.
 

·
Telstar 28
Joined
·
992 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
987 Posts
It used to make me nervous when people watched me dock but no more. There are big power cruisers in my marina with twin screws that bounce off the pilings more than I do. I back in and if I get the stern past the outermost pilings life is good. Rubrails take over from there.
 

·
O'day 26
Joined
·
205 Posts
My slip neighbor seems to think more of my docking abilities than I do. Came into the slip this weekend with a strong crosswind. He was floating on a raft in the fairway, watched me line up, but didnt move. Guess he figured that I could just bump him out of the way if needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
987 Posts
The premiere qualification for being a boat handling instructor at any maritime school is the ability to dock a keel boat, especially a full keel boat. If you can do that they automatically know you can handle any of their powerboats, even if you tell them you've never done it. Keep that in mind next time "Admiral Power" critiques your landing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Coming into the marina the other day I noticed the water level was about 18" lower than normal. As we kept motoring in I noticed the water swirling around all the boats in their slips. I know now that as we had 2 days of off shore wind, the river had been sucked down in water level. The swirling was water rushing back into the river! Well I noticed the boat was moving faster than normal during docking and I lost control of the boat as I tried to make the turn into our slip. (I have to make a righthand turn, then a quick left turn and stop along a retaining wall). My wife on the bow jumped off onto the stern of a power boat just as we slid sideways into it. Only scratches to our hull and no other damage. I was shaken and very glad we didn't cause more damage. O ya. Just as we stopped, a truck pulled up, the window rolled down and someone took a picture of us. Guess people like to see others having a hard time.

Phil
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
987 Posts
It's good that people watch us. It encourages good seamanship. Watching others was how I learned. I had both good and bad examples.

We had a problem at the start of the summer coming into our slip, it was just my wife and I. Can't remember all the details and there was no damage, it was just clumsy. Two things I do remember: a) it was all my fault b) there was no one watching (yes!) c) There wasn't any shouting, we just worked together to get it straightened away. I was more happy about c than b.
 

·
Not So Senior Member
Joined
·
2,506 Posts
One fine weekend I was at Pussers on ego alley gettin my drink on when a nasty T-storm rolled in. An elderly couple were coming in to tie up and had a hell of a time getting their 40ft. boat up against the wall. Some of us ran into the rain to grab lines, others laughed and pointed. The harbor master helped by pushing them up with his tender.

One A-hole in particular was very loud in exclaiming to his buds what a wreck that landing was, within earshot of the couple. I was sort-of loaded, so I asked him what he would have done that would have been so much a smoother landing if it were his boat. He didn't have an answer.

I try to grab a line, because one day I'll need someone to grab a line for me.

One time I was having a bad time getting in myself. The usual marina queen weekend drunks were looking and pointing. None came to help. My old buddy on the Westsail 32 ran over to grab a line and pull me in.....he knows full keel trouble more than anyone. A few weeks later, one of the guys on his marina queen with 6' fin keel finally got out on the water for the first time this year. He tried to come back in at low tide and got stuck in the mud right in front of his slip..... I didn't help that time. I've got enough in my Karma kitty to look past that one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,706 Posts
First time we docked our new-to-us boat was at a marina where we were over-nighting when we were bringing her home. Of course there was a bunch of power-boaters at the end of the row of slips opposite of where we were to tie up. We yelled-out "New boat! First time!" and two of 'em rushed down and back up to our side to give us a hand. When we succeeded in getting lines around a pair of pilings, the others, watching from the other side, all good-naturedly cheered, applauded and yelled-out things like "Well done!" I stood on the foredeck and bowed :D.

As for docking, now, in our home slip: We're too busy making sure we get her in as cleanly as possible, w/o damaging anything, to worry about whether anybody's watching. It's easier for us than many, being as our slip is at the end of a canal. Unless there's wind pushing her around, it's just the boats motion we have to deal with. So slow and easy is the order of the day.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
987 Posts
Used to worry about what people thought a long time ago. Then I grew up.

Now - have two concerns a) Don't hit anyone else's boat. b) Don't bang up my own boat.

If there are people on the dock that are offering to help when I/we come in - I ask them to do specific things. And if we don't need any help, we say so politely.
 

·
Wish I never found SN!
Joined
·
2,117 Posts
What I have noticed is when the skipper starts shouting and swearing at the crew, it is time to stop listening and take care of self preservation. He is not yelling at me or calling me names he is mad at himself because he has done the wrong thing and is in no position to remedy it.
 
1 - 20 of 93 Posts
Top