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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Borrowed Chrysler 22' swing keel. Ignition key broke off, didn't think id have a motor. Wind was 20 knots from the north, dock was to our south. The slip faces east/west, other boats all around and their sterns extending past the docks. Ended up getting motor on , but how would I have docked otherwise?
 

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Anchor and call for a tow, or...

Sail gently into fuel dock or T-end and wait for conditions to calm while plotting next steps, or...

Learn how to hot-wire your motor. It may come in handy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
When I turn west towards the slip I'd have to be right on, no mistakes. Also can't control speed of entry ( I subscribe to - one should only enter at the speed they're willing to hit the dock at). No reverse gear. Can't enter on a beam reach reefed. Too tight, no room for the boom to swing, would have to ease it way out to slow the boat on a reach.
 

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if you think you're going too fast, even with the sails down, you can drop a bucket off the stern. I keep one onboard with a strong handle and a rope for rinsing the deck etc.

to slow down..you could also make a series of short sharp turns port and starboard..using the rudder to help brake you...

assuming you have your fenders out and docklines and a spring line ready..you shouldn't have that much way on that you can't stop a 22 ft boat with a cleat and a spring line without doing damage.

Next time you dock with your engine working with wind astern..put it in neutral/idle early and see what happens.
 

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Master Mariner
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There is absolutely no reason to consider this question. Anchor or heave to outside the marina and call for a commercial tow.
Should anything go wrong in your attempt to sail into your marina in 20k of wind, I'd bet it would cost you much, much more than the tow would. Attempting to sail into anyplace that you do not need to, in adverse conditions is foolhardy, dangerous and poor seamanship. Display your common sense and seamanship by not risking your boat and those of others, wrecklessly.
 

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As often happens with limited information, I misread this as him already in the marina heading for the slip, when the engine died. By all means, if you're outside the marina, drop an anchor, drop the sail..deal with the engine or get a tow if needed.
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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You can do a lot with a couple of anchors, "walking" your way from one to the other. Also, with a 22' boat, those ancient devices called oars can be utilized:) I have seen good sailors get large sailboats, under sail, into incredibly difficult spots with adverse wind and currents. No way I am good enough to dare to attempt such maneuvers but it is possible. It is awesome to watch what can be done under sail when a master sailor is at the helm.
 

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There is absolutely no reason to consider this question. Anchor or heave to outside the marina and call for a commercial tow.
Seriously?

People actually do sail without motors.

I worked for 7 years at a 100+ slip municipal marina in a busy harbor and we rented on an hourly basis 3 Rhodes 19s with fixed keels. No motors. The only way in and out of the slips was under sail. The idea of dropping anchor outside the harbor and calling for a tow because you don't have engine power is laughable. We never had an engine to begin with.
 

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Freedom isn't free
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This is ridiculous... apparently it's been a while since many of you have sailed small boats.

Its a 22! You could stop it by hand!

I'd say if you don't know how to use a spring line you have likely missed how to properly tie your boat up...

You sail up to the point where you are within say 100 feet... drop all and or release all, make sure you are doing about 2 knots at 100 feet away. Make your turn, and even if you are coming in HOT.. you scramble off and throw the spring line on FIRST... if your spring line is set correctly it should stop the boat before it hits the dock, and it should swing away enough to throw your 2nd spring line on. Done.

I dock all the time solo in my 25, including several dockings solo in up to 20, in squirrly winds where our marina is (usually oscillating through our docks).

This all based on skill level and should be practiced in lighter air first. But one should know how to do this stuff for when the sh$t eventually hits the fan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for all the replies. I'm pretty confident I could do it in a dinghy sailor, they're much more maneuverable. I think the anchor and call for tow is the correct answer in this case.

Why an electric ignition ? Why not? All outboard controls are inside the cockpit, which is nice.

Don't know about using oars, the boat sits pretty high in the water, and the 20 knots we'd be competing with. A 22' keelboat is not THAT light, folks.

What I did not mention originally is that downwind of the dock it's really tight (no room to maneuver) and shallow. The lake is filled with pontoon boaters with no knowledge, or concern, for other boaters, let alone sailboats. One pontoon was stationed (anchored) downwind of where I would have liked to have gone downwind of the dock to make a beat approach.

Swallow pride, call for tow.
 

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For serious though...

20 knots with the wind on your back are not conditions to start learning to dock without a motor with other boats are around. Call a tow would be the wise choice. Though it may hurt your pride, it won't hurt your reputation like hitting other boats would.
Seeing another boat under tow only makes me think, "Aw, sucks for that guy." Seeing a guy hit another boat pisses me off and makes me call him names under my breath.

Set out some jugs or floaties outside of the marina and practice docking between them. It doesn't hurt to learn how to dock under sail.
 
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It really depends on your sailing environment. Do you have good clear wind all the way to the slip? Then sailing to the dock should be doable. However, best not to take chances of causing thousands of dollars of damage to your boat and others if you screw up.

Perhaps try practicing with your engine in neutral. That way, you can recover from your errors.

I went sailing with Dennis Conner once in some charity thing. He insisted on sailing back to the dock, and we did just that. And he wouldn't let his crew start the engine.
 

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Not sure how a power boat towing a sailboat is going to have any easier of a time getting the boat into its slip in the conditions/circumstance as described. Sounds like there was no room for a hip tow into the slip.

If the OP can't sail the boat into the slip, then the answer is to have someone transferred to the boat who can. I'd much rather sail a 22' boat into a slip, than try to tow it or be towed in 20 knots of wind.

Also, he wasn't DDW into the slip. He was DDW to the dock, then west into the slip so the wind would be on the beam. Even better. Personally, I'd probably drop the main, sail downwind on just the jib, let the jib sheet go, hard right into the slip and get a line onto a cleat. If someone is there helping on the dock, it's really not that hard of an endeavor.
 

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Then he should practice that with the engine in neutral. A novice should not be trying to sail to the dock with no engine.

Not sure how a power boat towing a sailboat is going to have any easier of a time getting the boat into its slip in the conditions/circumstance as described. Sounds like there was no room for a hip tow into the slip.

If the OP can't sail the boat into the slip, then the answer is to have someone transferred to the boat who can. I'd much rather sail a 22' boat into a slip, than try to tow it or be towed in 20 knots of wind.

Also, he wasn't DDW into the slip. He was DDW to the dock, then west into the slip so the wind would be on the beam. Even better. Personally, I'd probably drop the main, sail downwind on just the jib, let the jib sheet go, hard right into the slip and get a line onto a cleat. If someone is there helping on the dock, it's really not that hard of an endeavor.
 

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Then he should practice that with the engine in neutral. A novice should not be trying to sail to the dock with no engine.
Well, a novice should not be trying to dock any boat, engine or not, in tight quarters, in 20 knots of wind, period.

In 20 knots of wind, in tight quarters, on a small sailboat, an outboard hanging off the back is not a huge advantage, and it's definitely a mistake to think that it will save your butt.
 

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When I turn west towards the slip I'd have to be right on, no mistakes. Also can't control speed of entry ( I subscribe to - one should only enter at the speed they're willing to hit the dock at). No reverse gear. Can't enter on a beam reach reefed. Too tight, no room for the boom to swing, would have to ease it way out to slow the boat on a reach.
Sure you can control your speed by rapidly swinging the rudder back and forth, using the momentary almost instantaneous and very RAPID full swing of the rudder as a ' drag brake' to bleed off speed. Takes some practice as the boat must not be allowed to swing during the "violent' almost full swing of the rudder - you 'snap' it into a full turn yet the boat shouldnt 'yaw'. Best done with a tiller, not a steering wheel and with the sails dropped. On most smaller boats you can gain forward motion by rapidly 'sculling' the tiller.
 
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