SailNet Community banner
1 - 20 of 56 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
From watching the many YouTube videos about sailing life, it seems the people who liveaboard at sea don't tend to use their stove/oven inside the boat, but instead take a camping stove out to the cockpit to cook.

Why is that? Is it just too hot to cook indoors? I can imagine the steam generated could make the cabin damp, but are there other reasons? Why do so many boats have stoves in the galley if no one uses them?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
339 Posts
We use it on occasion, sometimes its nice to make an app in it or the like. We are not (yet) live-aboards, so we will sometimes take something premade from home down to the fridge to be heated later. Mostly though, using the burners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,942 Posts
When we bought our boat it was 8 years old and the oven had never been used. We use the oven a fair amount when we are away. We usually cook oven meals when the weather is cooler, particularly in winter.

We use the stove all the time. What us the point of having a full galley if you aren't going to use it? There is no concern with moisture build up, we always have hatches open, and there is an opening portlight right above the stove. My only hesitation is cooking smelly foods like curry, bacon etc. The smells linger in the boat for a while, but we ventilate well and it goes away.

Most of our protein is done on the gas grill on the rail.

Sent from my SM-G981W using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
When we bought our boat it was 8 years old and the oven had never been used. We use the oven a fair amount when we are away. We usually cook oven meals when the weather is cooler, particularly in winter.

We use the stove all the time. What us the point of having a full galley if you aren't going to use it? There is no concern with moisture build up, we always have hatches open, and there is an opening portlight right above the stove. My only hesitation is cooking smelly foods like curry, bacon etc. The smells linger in the boat for a while, but we ventilate well and it goes away.

Most of our protein is done on the gas grill on the rail.

Sent from my SM-G981W using Tapatalk
Good to know! Since the pandemic, I've been making bread, and have become fond of fresh baked bread. I have learned how to make flatbread (preparing for sailing life) but would like to bake an occasional loaf. And cookies... must have cookies....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,593 Posts
Hi,

I am not a liveaboard. However, when doing long distance races or cruises we do use the oven. It's not an every day occurrence, but a hot meal does cheer up the crew. I had no problem cooking baked ziti, lasagna, etc. The nice thing about cooking in the oven is that it's unattended.. Put something in and 45 -60 minutes later it's done.

The stove does get more usage than the oven, but the oven works well.

Barry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
We are not liveaboards but we do use the stove every time we're on the boat. We haven't used the oven yet, it seems to need something, my wife actually figured out what was needed to get the oven going, I forget. So in the meantime I bought this 'Omnia' oven that sits on the burner, my wife has managed to bake all kinds of stuff in this thing, it works pretty damn good, at first she was skeptical but now shes a believer, so much so that I haven't heard anymore about getting the 'real' oven fired up.

I will probably get it (the real oven) going sooner than later but for now, with our minimal amount of time at the boat, the Omnia is fine....
 

·
Super Moderator
Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
Joined
·
10,710 Posts
I use both the stove and the oven but certainly use the stove more than the oven. That said, I am a vegetarian, don't drink soda or alcohol, and do not have refrigeration. In other words, my use will probably be different that most folks on here. The vegetarian part means that I never barbeque. The no refrigeration part means 6-7 days out, all the rest of the food needs to be either canned, non-perishable or dry packed.

I have never tried to bake bread in my oven, but when going out for longer periods of time I have used the oven. On those occasions, I have made meals at home, cut them into appropriate portion sizes, put them in a seal-a-meal and froze them. I keep those frozen meals in the ice box. They act as 'ice' but by maybe 3-6 days out they will thaw. At that point, I either warm the meal by putting the seal-a-meal pouch in boiling water, empty the contents into the top pot of a double boiler to heat the food (for something like soup or chilly), or put it on a baking pan and cook it in the oven (for something like lasagna, burritos, or spanakopita). I don't find that the oven heats up the cabin much, but most of the times that I have used the oven has been on early spring cruises and fall cruises where the air temps are cooler so that kind of hot meal is more appealing.

Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,887 Posts
I don't watch much youtube, but don't know anyone out cruising who is doing all of their cooking on a camp stove in the cockpit. Did you see perhaps cooking on a grill in the cockpit instead? That is common.

We use our gas stove and oven pretty much every day. We use our electric induction plate, convection oven, and microwave a lot also. Our BBQ is probably the least used cooking device on board.

I'm using the royal "we", as I personally don't use any of it.

Mark
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,417 Posts
As a liveaboard for the last 5 decades or so, I can't imagine most of the comments above. If I had a stove and oven (preferably propane) they were used, in most conditions at sea. The stove top was hot fresh coffee when needed, which was often 4-6 times a day at sea. Before I had a genset, a microwave wasn't available to me, so the oven was the rewarmer.
We never made bread as such, but banana bread was common, as were cakes and even cabin bread pizzas for one equator crossing. Imagination is mandatory when living out of cans. I still have my double gimbaled "Sea Swing" stove. It has a kerosine Primus cooker with an adjustable very heavy all brass counter weight. It never, ever spilled one drop of boiling water (or anything else) no matter how rough it was. It is an amazing piece of non-technology. I can imagine that it was aboard Spray, when Slocum circumnavigated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,942 Posts
Good to know! Since the pandemic, I've been making bread, and have become fond of fresh baked bread. I have learned how to make flatbread (preparing for sailing life) but would like to bake an occasional loaf. And cookies... must have cookies....
The oven on our boat isn't the greatest as it doesn't have a thermostat, and it doesn't seem capable of going over 375°, but it works fine for most things, you just have to monitor the temp. We found high quality cookie sheets and a non-stick roasting pan that fit the oven perfectly.

We have been experimenting with ciabatta breads, and we have done some scratch cookie recipes, although we also get lazy and buy Pilsbury cookies and cinnamon buns that come in the cardboard cylinder. They are quick, easy and they travel well.

Sent from my SM-G981W using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,942 Posts
Hi,

I am not a liveaboard. However, when doing long distance races or cruises we do use the oven. It's not an every day occurrence, but a hot meal does cheer up the crew. I had no problem cooking baked ziti, lasagna, etc. The nice thing about cooking in the oven is that it's unattended.. Put something in and 45 -60 minutes later it's done.

The stove does get more usage than the oven, but the oven works well.

Barry
In my young racing days when we were on stripped down race boats we were lucky to have a single burner stove, and usually ate cold meals. We referred to the more luxurious racer/cruisers as "Lasagna Boats" because they had ovens and ate hot meals during the races!

Sent from my SM-G981W using Tapatalk
 

·
Old soul
Joined
·
5,661 Posts
As others have already said, it would be bizarre to have real cruisers using a camp stove in the cockpit when they have an actual stove and oven on board. Another waste of Youtube space I'd say.

Of course we use our oven... quite a lot. Bread, cookies, casseroles, pizza, various 'melts'... made shepherd's pie the other night. How else would I get the cheese to melt just right ;).

We use the stove burners more than the oven, but our oven gets used a few times a week while we're on board.
Food Kitchen appliance Ingredient Staple food Recipe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
From watching the many YouTube videos about sailing life, it seems the people who liveaboard at sea don't tend to use their stove/oven inside the boat, but instead take a camping stove out to the cockpit to cook.

Why is that? Is it just too hot to cook indoors? I can imagine the steam generated could make the cabin damp, but are there other reasons? Why do so many boats have stoves in the galley if no one uses them?
Not sure which channels you've been watching, I've only seen 1 youtuber that does this. I've always used the stove onboard. seems logical
 

·
Registered
Contest 36s
Joined
·
8,057 Posts
We use the stove when we stay onboard. We're on our second one! Boats need ventilation. Cooking does throw off humidity. A fair amount of out meals are pre cooked or prepared meals that don't require more than heating up.
Food Tableware Kitchen utensil Dishware Kitchen appliance
Food Water Ingredient Tableware Al dente
Food Kitchen utensil Gas stove Kitchen appliance Cookware and bakeware
Food Table Tableware Dishware Sharing
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,608 Posts
How would you bake blueberry muffins in Penobscot Bay without an oven? We use it for lasagna on overnight races and for heating casseroles prepared at home. Closing the door keeps things heating that would fly off the stovetop in nasty conditions.
 
1 - 20 of 56 Posts
Top