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Discussion Starter #1
So I just used Sikaflex 291 for the first time. I thought it was going to be white, but it was black. I'm assuming I got the right stuff.

Anyway, does anything remove it?!? I got the stuff everywhere, and damn it does not come off. I got it on my Leatherman, on my favorite Crescent wrench, and it's basically covering the outside of the thru-hull.

It doesn't wash off at all, which makes sense sense the whole idea is that it's a marine sealant.

So.... Acetone? Gasoline?
 

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So I just used Sikaflex 291 for the first time. I thought it was going to be white, but it was black. I'm assuming I got the right stuff.

Anyway, does anything remove it?!? I got the stuff everywhere, and damn it does not come off. I got it on my Leatherman, on my favorite Crescent wrench, and it's basically covering the outside of the thru-hull.

It doesn't wash off at all, which makes sense sense the whole idea is that it's a marine sealant.

So.... Acetone? Gasoline?
Sika comes in black, white and grey - maybe more. Shops usually have at least white and black.

Acetone doesn't solve Sika. Actually, not much do. I usually use kerosene (solves un-hardened Sika), and rub it off. It does take some time, but it will not be difficult to get off from your metal tools.

Boat yards are often "careful" when using Sika, ie they use slightly too little. In that way they do not need to wipe anything off.
Myself, I use too much of the Sika instead, as I do want whatever I am using it to to be tight. If necessary, cut with a sharp knife when hardened.

/J
 

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291 is a polyurethane. Mineral spirits works before it's cured. After cure I don't know of any solvent. BTW, it comes in black or white.

Edit: here you go....
Uncured Sikaflex®-291 may be
removed from tools and equipment
with mineral spirit or an other
suitable solvent. Once cured, the
material can only be removed
mechanically. Hands and exposed
skin should be washed immediately
using a suitable industrial hand
cleanser and water. Do not use
solvents on hands!
 

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Unfortunately, a lesson learned the hard way. Just the way I learned it! Many years ago, I also recall literally having to wait for the skin to grow out to displace the adhesive I got on them. Takes about a week. Hey, you'll look like you must be handy to observers. :)

It's nothing but pick, scrape and sand to get off tools.

Ask me about coating both arms up to my elbows in creosote, when I was about 13 and was slathering it on the docks at the marina before season launch. Another never again. :)
 

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Sorry but I can't help but laugh. I was in the auto glass field for about 20 years. And for about 20 years, my hands were stained black. In case you didn't know, products by Sikaflex are also used to mount windshields in place. Mineral spirits will do the job of cleaning it off of the boat (although old paint could be stained). As for your tools, wire brush. Your hands, scrub off what you can and the rest will wear off in a week or so. As for contact with clothes, you just got some new rags.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ha hah, these are a hilarious bunch of responses!

Lessons learned. I keep saying that's my purpose with this boat, to learn how to do things right, so I'm counting this as one of the lessons.



I feel a bit sorry for the friend I recruited to hold a screwdriver on the outside of the hull while I tightened the nuts on the inside.

She: I got this black goop on me.

Me: Oh, it'll wash right off.

Doh!



I'm the computer guy at a printing plant. When I show up at work tomorrow with my hands stained black all over people are going to think I belong out on the shop floor with the inks, instead of in the offices!
 

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Hey Minnesail, sounds like your friend was a trooper! I can't even begin to count how many (all?) of the women that I've dated that said at one time or another "you have lost your frigging mind if you think you're putting those hands on me!". That's the clean version for the kiddies. Ah, the good ol days. lol

Best of luck to ya!
 

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I've always been amazed at how that black stuff can spread to extension cords, etc, even when they are in a locker and the tube is on the foredeck. It was even worse when the damm stuff was two part stirred with a stick. Quantum scientists have begun to make progress in understanding the situation . The use of paired electrons in the manufacture of the material has been the issue all along which allows the goop to be in two places at the same time and the electron spin over comes the surface tension of logical thinking.
 

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As geoff54 noted above, the label on the product is full of relevant information:

Removal
Uncured Sikaflex®-291 may be
removed from tools and equipment
with mineral spirit or an other
suitable solvent. Once cured, the
material can only be removed
mechanically. Hands and exposed
skin should be washed immediately
using a suitable industrial hand
cleanser and water. Do not use
solvents on hands!
Overpainting
Sikaflex®-291 can be overpainted
 

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Discussion Starter #13
As geoff54 noted above, the label on the product is full of relevant information:
What, read the directions? That makes no sense.

I've decided I like the look of it on my 12" Crescent wrench. Makes it look dangerous.
 

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Actually the over application can serve a useful function. With a lifestyle that many of us sport, the passage of time can be measured by how degraded the hand botches are .This works only if the projects are spaced appropriately So spacing is a good thing. Works for the girls I go with.
 

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I had a thought (such a rare event that I decided to share it).... depending on thickness, temperature and humidity, 291 can take several days to cure fully - might still be worth trying mineral spirits.

The stuff that Multihullgirl likes and linked to claims to remove most cured polyurethanes and polysulphides. I'd give a try; in fact I might because it would be nice to have something that worked.
 
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